https://www.espn.com/college-sports/...lt-allegations

The committee noted that while a former Baylor president described the school's handling of sexual violence as a "colossal operational failure," current NCAA rules do not allow the Committee on Infractions to punish schools for how they handled such issues.
The NCAA said the committee considered charges in three specific incidents of "alleged or threatened violence" by football players that weren't reported by members of the football staff, which the enforcement staff had alleged were impermissible benefits.

"The panel found that those instances of non-reporting did not constitute impermissible benefits to football student-athletes because of a campus-wide culture of nonreporting," the NCAA said in a release. "That culture was driven by the school's broader failure to prioritize Title IX implementation, creating an environment in which faculty and staff did not know and/or understand their obligations to report allegations of sexual or interpersonal violence. Because the culture of non-reporting was not limited to cases involving student-athletes, the panel could not find that these instances resulted in impermissible benefits."
"My client Art Briles has been completely exonerated and cleared of all NCAA violations alleged against him," Briles' attorney, Scott Tompsett, said in a statement to ESPN. "As the NCAA Committee on Infractions explained, the conduct at issue was pervasive and widespread throughout the Baylor campus, and it was condoned or ignored by the highest levels of Baylor's leadership. The NCAA's decision today clears the way for Mr. Briles to return to coaching college football."