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Thread: Ammo new guest is John Stockton!

  1. #1
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    Default Ammo new guest is John Stockton!

    https://youtu.be/AhcgA6JgG2w

    I haven't watched it yet, just came out. Pretty excited about this one.

  2. #2
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    Stockton, a first round pick, was offered a minimum seventy five grand on his rookie deal. He held out. His coach told the press that Stockton's replacement was in camp. Shortly thereafter, the team upped the offer to eighty grand. Stockton jumped on the deal. He held out for five grand. Heck, the pro high school leagues are probably paying five times as much for a season.
    I miss Mike Hart

  3. #3
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    I could of listened to another few hours but it looks like Adam had a pitch count (probably an hour interview).

    The interview flew by and left me wanting more so nice work Adam and thanks John Stockton (for everything).

  4. #4
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    So, so good.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    If at first you don't succeed, try to solve the situation with a spud gun. ~Dwight Schrute~

  5. #5
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    Stockton had a couple of very interesting comments:

    There is an argument that goes like this: The NBA game has created an environment where offensive minded players can run free and score without persistent defensive challenge (relative to Stockton's era). Stockton believes that this is doing a disservice to the great scorers of the modern era because they cannot truly master their offensive skills until they are consistently challenged at a high defensive level. An "iron sharpens iron" type philosophy. I tend to agree with him. You can talk about the great scorers of today, but just how good would they really be if they were matched up against a peak Dennis Rodman, using Rodman era rules, with Rodman era officiating? You really can't measure offensive greatness across time if it has not conquered a comparatively equal defensive presence.

    There is another argument that goes like this: The traditional "back to the basket" center, similar in skill set to Luke Garza or Drew Timme, has become relatively obsolete in the modern NBA. Stockton believes that a team will adopt any identity that lends itself to winning. I get the impression that he believes that basketball trends are cyclic, and that although right now the trend is to spread em out and shoot threes, teams will be quick to emulate any type of identity that delivers sustained success. In other words, when some stud, generational center starts to dominate the league because of a lack of style familiarity, skill set, and physical size to challenge him, the league will trend back to including these traditional center skill sets back into the roster. It seems that Stockton believes there is a place in the NBA for aspiring centers, but it falls upon them to convince any given team that their style can win and is worth investing in and building around.

    Anyway, I may have interpreted Stockton's intended dialog incorrectly, but this is the perception he left me with.
    I miss Mike Hart

  6. #6
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    Players will evolve and thrive based on the rules that are in place. Its not necessarily more or less skill, just different. Trends certainly are a cycle. I think things are starting to slowly swing back toward the big man, with PF & Cs getting the last three MVPs after more than a decade of them going to guards and small forwards. That said those bigs aren't going to look like the 90s players did with all the illegal defense rules that encouraged iso play, or the 60s & 70s star players before the 3 point line.

    Really looking forward to listening to this one...just finished Stocktons book a few months back and I always really enjoy his insight.

  7. #7
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    Man, I love to listen to Adam chat with his guests about basketball, and the kinds of insights that he is able to elicit from them.
    I will thank God for the day and the moment I have. - Jimmy V

  8. #8
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    I think you're right about the cyclical nature of the game, but I don't think true post play won't come back until the rules are equalized for post players. The amount of contact allowed in the post is much greater than the perimeter. A defensive player can't hand check or touch a perimeter player but he can use an arm bar in the post.

    Quote Originally Posted by MickMick View Post
    Stockton had a couple of very interesting comments:

    There is an argument that goes like this: The NBA game has created an environment where offensive minded players can run free and score without persistent defensive challenge (relative to Stockton's era). Stockton believes that this is doing a disservice to the great scorers of the modern era because they cannot truly master their offensive skills until they are consistently challenged at a high defensive level. An "iron sharpens iron" type philosophy. I tend to agree with him. You can talk about the great scorers of today, but just how good would they really be if they were matched up against a peak Dennis Rodman, using Rodman era rules, with Rodman era officiating? You really can't measure offensive greatness across time if it has not conquered a comparatively equal defensive presence.

    There is another argument that goes like this: The traditional "back to the basket" center, similar in skill set to Luke Garza or Drew Timme, has become relatively obsolete in the modern NBA. Stockton believes that a team will adopt any identity that lends itself to winning. I get the impression that he believes that basketball trends are cyclic, and that although right now the trend is to spread em out and shoot threes, teams will be quick to emulate any type of identity that delivers sustained success. In other words, when some stud, generational center starts to dominate the league because of a lack of style familiarity, skill set, and physical size to challenge him, the league will trend back to including these traditional center skill sets back into the roster. It seems that Stockton believes there is a place in the NBA for aspiring centers, but it falls upon them to convince any given team that their style can win and is worth investing in and building around.

    Anyway, I may have interpreted Stockton's intended dialog incorrectly, but this is the perception he left me with.

  9. #9
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    Very enjoyable.

    Thanks SERE.
    But we don't play nobody.

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