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Thread: Notable Passages: 2021

  1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by kitzbuel View Post
    My boss and I were talking about this today. There is a full roster of HOF'ers that have passed away over the last year.
    Having a lively debate with some of the fellahs re: Who is the greatest living baseball HOF'er. Seems to come down to three choices:

    Willie Mays
    Sandy Koufax
    Ken Griffey, Jr.

    Nobody suggested Reggie Jackson, Brooks Robinson, Johnny Bench, Boggs, Henderson, Ripken, or Jeter.

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by RenoZag View Post
    Having a lively debate with some of the fellahs re: Who is the greatest living baseball HOF'er. Seems to come down to three choices:

    Willie Mays
    Sandy Koufax
    Ken Griffey, Jr.

    Nobody suggested Reggie Jackson, Brooks Robinson, Johnny Bench, Boggs, Henderson, Ripken, or Jeter.
    My ranking

    Say Hey
    The Kid
    Lefty

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by RenoZag View Post
    Having a lively debate with some of the fellahs re: Who is the greatest living baseball HOF'er. Seems to come down to three choices:

    Willie Mays
    Sandy Koufax
    Ken Griffey, Jr.

    Nobody suggested Reggie Jackson, Brooks Robinson, Johnny Bench, Boggs, Henderson, Ripken, or Jeter.
    If you could get Bench and Ripken on the same team... talk about a desire to win.
    'I found it is the small everyday deeds of ordinary folk that keep the darkness at bay… small acts of kindness and love.'
    - Gandalf the Grey

    ________________________________



    Foo Time

  4. #29
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    Back to the Hammer. He played minor league ball in my hometown, but before my time. My dad said he went to a number of games. Then, when he came back to Milwaukee for his last couple of years, we went down to catch some games so my dad could see him again at the end of his career. One of the funnier memories I have of him from those games was seeing him sitting in the dugout smoking a cigarette. Different times back then.
    My posts indicate that I don't seem to follow college basketball all that closely.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by kitzbuel View Post
    My boss and I were talking about this today. There is a full roster of HOF'ers that have passed away over the last year.
    The Baseball Hall of Fame has lost 10 of its members in the past 10 months: Al Kaline in April; Tom Seaver in August; Lou Brock in September; Bob Gibson, Whitey Ford and Morgan in October; Phil Niekro in December; and Tommy Lasorda, Don Sutton and Aaron this month.


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  6. #31
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    “He’s in the last sentence of greatest player of all time,” Jackson said. “Aaron, Ruth, Mays, Gehrig, Mantle — I don’t know that Ted Williams gets there because he couldn’t run like those guys — and Ty Cobb and Rickey Henderson. So they’re in a class by themselves, and I think for sheer talent, Griffey is in there, too. The game was easy for those guys.”

    All plaques are the same size in the Hall of Fame gallery. Officially, Aaron and Mays share the same status as Elmer Flick and High Pockets Kelly. Unofficially, a few rise far above the rest.

    “Reggie used to say there’s Hall of Famers and then there’s really Hall of Famers,” Palmer said with a laugh. “Maybe only Reggie can say it, but it’s true: This is Hank Aaron! When you think of the great players, you think of Ted Williams, you think of Stan Musial, you think of Willie Mays. I mean, I was a good pitcher, but I wasn’t Tom Seaver. And Hank Aaron — it’s like getting to the top of the mountain.”

    Beyond that, Palmer said, Aaron personified class. Jackson said Aaron carried himself with a kind of regal dignity that few others have had: Joe DiMaggio and Sandy Koufax, Jack Nicklaus and Arnold Palmer, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Julius Erving.

    “There’s something about them,” Jackson said. “There’s some kind of angel or some kind of sainthood that’s around them. If they were in England, they’d all be knighted.”
    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/01/22/s...l-of-fame.html


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  7. #32
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    Larry King, legendary talk show host, dies at 87

    https://www.cnn.com/2021/01/23/us/la...rnd/index.html
    .
    .
    .
    "thnk god for few" jazzdelmar(12/12/11 12:50pm)
    .
    "When most of us couldn't buy a basket. Where do we get off anyway?!" siliconzag (11/17/06 5:45:41 pm)
    .
    I am monitoring the price of a donut
    .

  8. #33
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    Jimmie Rodgers, whose smooth voice straddled the line between pop and country and brought him a string of hits — none bigger than his first record, “Honeycomb,” in 1957 — died on Monday in Palm Desert, Calif. He was 87.

    His daughter Michele Rodgers said that the cause was kidney disease and that he had also tested positive for Covid-19.

    Mr. Rodgers was a regular presence on the pop, country, R&B and easy listening charts for a decade after “Honeycomb,” with records that included “Oh-Oh, I’m Falling in Love Again” (1958) and “Child of Clay” (1967), both of which were nominated for Grammy Awards.

    He might have continued that run of success but for an ugly incident in December 1967, when he was pulled over by a man who, he later said, was an off-duty Los Angeles police officer and beat him severely.

    Three brain surgeries followed, and he was left with a metal plate in his head. He eventually resumed performing, and even briefly had his own television show, but he faced constant difficulties. For a time he was sidelined because he started having seizures during concerts.

    “Once word gets out that you’re having seizures onstage, you can’t work,” he told The News Sentinel of Knoxville, Tenn., in 1998. “People won’t hire you.”

    Mr. Rodgers was found to have spasmodic dysphonia, a disorder characterized by spasms in the muscles of the voice box, a condition he attributed to his brain injury. Yet he later settled into a comfortable niche as a performer and producer in Branson, Mo., the country music mecca, where he had his own theater for several years before retiring to California in 2002.

    Rodgers was borin Camas, WA.

  9. #34
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    Default Al Downing, on Hank Aaron

    From the NYT:

    Q: When you think about all that, how do you sum up Aaron’s legacy?

    AD: It shows you how great an impact not only sports, but also the sportsmen, the person carrying the message, can have on society and trying to bridge that gap that exists between cultures. He definitely personified that. He did it with such dignity, such grace, and it wasn’t like, “Oh, I showed you I could do this.” He showed ’em with his bat and with his legs and with his glove.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/01/23/s...gtype=Homepage

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    Cloris Leachman, age 94.

    After years of landing small roles on television, Leachman had her breakthrough playing the landlady, Phyllis, on "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" in the '70s ... which led to her own spin-off.

    She won 2 Emmys for the role, and a Golden Globe for Best TV Actress for "Phyllis."

    In film, Cloris is best known for 2 movies she made during the same time period -- "The Last Picture Show" in 1971, for which she won an Oscar for Best Supporting Actress ... and 1974's "Young Frankenstein." With 22 Emmy noms, she's the most nominated actress in history, and her 8 wins is the most of all time ... tied with Julia Louis-Dreyfus.
    RIP, Frau Blucher. . .

    https://www.tmz.com/2021/01/27/clori...-dead-dies-94/

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    Quote Originally Posted by RenoZag View Post
    Cloris Leachman, age 94.



    RIP, Frau Blucher. . .
    *Horses neigh

  12. #37
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    Actress Cicely Tyson, Age 96.

    https://variety.com/2021/tv/news/cic...es-1234895188/

    “I have managed Miss Tyson’s career for over 40 years, and each year was a privilege and blessing,” her manager, Larry Thompson, said in a statement. “Cicely thought of her new memoir as a Christmas tree decorated with all the ornaments of her personal and professional life. Today she placed the last ornament, a Star, on top of the tree.”


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    Former Temple Basketball Coach, John Cheney, age 89. Cheney will be remembered for the legendary teams he produced. He'll also be recalled for threatening to kill John Calipari when Cal was the coach at UMass

    https://www.vice.com/en/article/78n9...-john-calipari

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_C...ll,_born_1932)

    Katz, Davis, and others are reporting the Johns put the incident behind them, had fun with it, and did not let it define their relationship.

    RIP, Coach.

  14. #39
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    Default Dustin Diamond


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    Hal Holbrook, Actor Who Channeled Mark Twain, Is Dead at 95 . He carved out a substantial career in television and film but achieved the widest acclaim with his one-man stage show, playing Twain for more than six decades.
    Last edited by RenoZag; 02-02-2021 at 04:33 PM.

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    John J. Sweeney, a New York union researcher who climbed to the pinnacle of the American labor movement in the 1990s, leading the A.F.L.-C.I.O. for 14 years through an era of fading union membership but rising political influence, died on Monday at his home in Bethesda, Md. He was 86.

    Carolyn Bobb, an A.F.L.-C.I.O. spokeswoman, confirmed the death. She did not specify the cause.

    As president, from 1995 to 2009, of the nation’s largest labor federation — 56 unions with 10 million members near the end of his tenure — Mr. Sweeney flexed labor’s political muscle with thousands of volunteers and helped elect Barack Obama to the presidency in 2008. Over the years, he also helped elect Democrats to seats in Congress, to governorships and to state legislatures


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    Rennie Davis, who lived out one of the more quixotic journeys of the 1960s generation when he went from leading opponent of the Vietnam War, as a convicted member of the Chicago Seven, to spokesman for a teenage Indian guru, died on Tuesday at his home in Longmont, Colo. He was 79.

    His wife, Kirsten Liegmann, who announced the death on his Facebook page, said the cause was lymphoma, adding that a large tumor had been discovered only two weeks ago.

    Smart, charismatic and a blur of energy and engagement, Mr. Davis was a leading figure of the antiwar movement. After graduating from Oberlin College in Ohio, he joined the top ranks of the activist organization Students for a Democratic Society and the National Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam.


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    Tony Trabert, who won five Grand Slam tournament titles in a single year, 1955 — three in singles and two in doubles — making him the world’s No. 1 men’s player for a second time, died on Wednesday at his home in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. He was 90.

    His death was announced by the International Tennis Hall of Fame in Newport, R.I., where he was inducted in 1970.

    A sturdy 6-foot-1 and 185 pounds, Trabert drew on a powerful serve-and-volley game and an outstanding backhand in capturing the 1955 men’s singles at the French, Wimbledon and United States championships and teaming with Vic Seixas to take the men’s doubles at the Australian and French events. He had also been ranked No. 1 in 1953.

    Only Don Budge, who won all four men’s singles majors in 1938, and Rod Laver, who matched that feat in 1962 and 1969, have exceeded Trabert’s 1955 singles accomplishment, a mark that has been matched by several others.

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    Christopher Plummer, the prolific and versatile Canadian-born actor who rose to celebrity as the romantic lead in perhaps the most popular movie musical of all time, was critically lionized as among the pre-eminent Shakespeareans of the past century and won an Oscar, two Tonys and two Emmys, died on Friday at his home in Weston, Conn. He was 91.

    His wife, Elaine Taylor, said the cause was a blow to the head as a result of a fall.

    https://deadline.com/2021/02/christo...ar-1234688379/

  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by RenoZag View Post
    Christopher Plummer Passes Away At 91

    https://deadline.com/2021/02/christo...ar-1234688379/
    We just watched The Sound of Music last week. I hadn't watched it since I was a little kid and it was everyone else's first time seeing it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzgirl_127 View Post
    We just watched The Sound of Music last week. I hadn't watched it since I was a little kid and it was everyone else's first time seeing it.
    A classic.
    This post is for March Madness seeding purposes only.

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    So Long, Farewell, Christopher Plummer. Great movie.




  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by sittingon50 View Post
    A classic.
    My kids kept going on and on about the house and when the family fled Austria, they're like "they're leaving that nice house behind?!" We had to keep reminding them about the Nazis.

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    Leon Spinks - The Former Heavyweight Champion of the World

    https://www.espn.com/boxing/story/_/...ad-ali-dies-67

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    George P. Shultz, who presided with a steady hand over the beginning of the end of the Cold War as President Ronald Reagan’s often embattled secretary of state, died on Saturday at his home in Stanford, Calif. He was 100.

    Mr. Shultz, who had served Republican presidents since Dwight D. Eisenhower, moved to California after leaving Washington in January 1989. He continued writing and speaking on issues ranging from nuclear weapons to climate change into his late 90s, expressing concern about America’s direction.

    “Right now we’re not leading the world,” he told an interviewer in March 2020. “We’re withdrawing from it.”

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