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Thread: Season ticket holder update

  1. #1
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    Default Season ticket holder update

    This is an update season ticket holders received today. Among other things the update notes GU is operating under the assumption fan attendance at home games will not be allowed or limited. My thinking is those of you who are not season ticket holders will find this of interest regardless:


    Thank you for bearing with us as we navigate these uncertain times while planning for the upcoming men’s basketball season. We continue to be uplifted by the amazing support and understanding we’ve received from the Zag community and it’s because of you that we are optimistic about what the future holds. Thank you from all of us at Gonzaga Athletics.
    As you may have heard, the NCAA has approved a tentative start date of November 25th for the 2020-21 basketball season. Although this is an encouraging step, given the current local and state restrictions, we are operating under the assumption that fan attendance at home games will not be allowed or limited at best this year. We are beyond disappointed that this is the reality we’re currently facing, but we will continue to adapt to the situation with the ultimate goal of getting fans back to the Kennel once it is safe to do so.
    What does this mean for you as a season ticket holder? It means that we won’t be renewing season tickets as we normally would for the 2020-21 season. Even though we don’t foresee being able to pack the Kennel this year, we are still relying on you to continue your support as one of our most loyal fans through the ZAGS UNITED campaign. All season ticket holders that make a contribution will retain the opportunity to renew season tickets in the future regardless of their giving level.
    Like all athletic departments, Gonzaga is facing significant financial challenges due to the pandemic. With lost revenue from the cancelation of the NCAA tournament last year and the possibility of not playing in front of fans this season, we are facing losses that not only negatively impact our basketball program, but each of our 18 varsity sports and 330+ student athletes. We have implemented many cost-saving measures in an effort to alleviate the financial strain, however, we are relying on the continued generosity of our Zag community to ensure we remain competitive on a national level. Now more than ever, we need your support.
    In the coming weeks, you will receive more information in the mail about ZAGS UNITED. While we hope that you are able to financially support our department at the same level you provided last season, we welcome your contribution at the amount that is meaningful and makes sense for you and your family. Below we’ve outlined the ZAGS UNITED giving opportunities, which come with special benefits and recognition.
    • Contribute your men’s basketball seat-related contribution or more to be prioritized in ticket opportunities for this season on a game by game basis (should fans be allowed to attend) and receive exclusive digital content and invitations to digital events this season.
    • Contribute whatever you can to stay engaged and receive access to exclusive digital content throughout the year.
    Furthermore, thanks to the generosity of longtime benefactors who will be matching your support, season ticket holders will receive double Priority Points for ZAGS UNITED contributions.
    We know the current health crisis has had a significant impact on so many in our community and recognize it’s a tough time to be asking for financial contributions. However, we are steadfast in our belief that the Gonzaga community is driven by a passion and generosity of spirit that is unrivaled in the nation.
    Please keep an eye out in the mail for your opportunities to be involved in ZAGS UNITED as a season ticket holder and thank you in advance for your thoughtful consideration. Should you have any questions please don’t hesitate to contact the ticket office at 509-313-6000 or tickets@gonzaga.edu.
    Thank you again for being a part of the greatest fan base in the nation. GO ZAGS!

  2. #2
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    Pretty hard sell. Colleges tend to be a little more circumspect. Crazy times.

    Whoa. Digital content? What’s that about? I’d pay for that in a heartbeat if it’s game action.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by jazzdelmar View Post
    Pretty hard sell. Colleges tend to be a little more circumspect. Crazy times.

    Whoa. Digital content? What’s that about? I’d pay for that in a heartbeat if it’s game action.
    My wife once told me that she considered me, as a man, to be lucky.
    I was going to get a prostate exam, and it was to be digital.
    It's not funny.

  4. #4
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    I'm donating regardless. Sure I would love to see them in person but whatever I can do to help I will.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by zagbeliever View Post
    I'm donating regardless. Sure I would love to see them in person but whatever I can do to help I will.
    +1

  6. #6
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    +2

  7. #7
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    I plan to donate. I’m going to ask Mike Roth to comp me a few tickets to the Volkar Center pre-game reception.

  8. #8
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    Almost sounds like you could bypass the 30 year wait list with a sizable donation if some ticket holders don’t pay. Although if all they have to do to keep their seats is give ANY amount that may be a bit of a long shot.
    It's peanut butter jelly time!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by NotoriousZ View Post
    Almost sounds like you could bypass the 30 year wait list with a sizable donation if some ticket holders don’t pay. Although if all they have to do to keep their seats is give ANY amount that may be a bit of a long shot.
    - there is no such thing as a waiting list
    - each year there is a list, but not for waiting, but a list of who has the most points, and points means cash money. sure you get a handful of points for being women's ticket holder or a zag contributor but your placement on the 'list' is 95% generated by how much money you contributed that year.

    - i asked the athletic dept. so if i give 15k and am in the top 10 and it looks like there might be 10 seats available next year i could lose out if on the last week 4 others come in with a donation over my 15k.
    - i swear this is the truth, i was told yes that could happen, but not too worry they created a loop hole, it anyone gives the athletic dept. a 100k gift they will guarantee them a season ticket. nobody can leap frog you.

  10. #10
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    As a long time season ticket holder, the recent announcement really creates more questions than it answers. What is surprising is what appears to be the lack of financial planning for emergencies. I mean since age 5 or so, most of are taught the value of saving for a rainy day, even if there is no cloud in the sky. Did the Athletic Department not create a contingency fund? If so, was it simply too small to sustain itself during this Covid crisis? I mean, where is the realistic budget forecasting and testing? Do they all think the gravy train is never ending? Or is it more the case that the University is siphoning off every dollar it can from the Athletic Department, treating it as a cash cow, leaving nothing behind? What truly amazes me is that with all of the financial and economic experts most universities have as part of their faculties, many simply don’t follow sound business practices. Being a private university, I doubt we will ever know, but to rely on large benefactors and now season ticket holders to replace loss revenue doesn’t appear to be sound financial planning. All that said, I will write a check simply to retain my right to purchase season tickets. But you do have to wonder what is going on behind the scenes.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by AirborneJag View Post
    As a long time season ticket holder, the recent announcement really creates more questions than it answers. What is surprising is what appears to be the lack of financial planning for emergencies. I mean since age 5 or so, most of are taught the value of saving for a rainy day, even if there is no cloud in the sky. Did the Athletic Department not create a contingency fund? If so, was it simply too small to sustain itself during this Covid crisis? I mean, where is the realistic budget forecasting and testing? Do they all think the gravy train is never ending? Or is it more the case that the University is siphoning off every dollar it can from the Athletic Department, treating it as a cash cow, leaving nothing behind? What truly amazes me is that with all of the financial and economic experts most universities have as part of their faculties, many simply don’t follow sound business practices. Being a private university, I doubt we will ever know, but to rely on large benefactors and now season ticket holders to replace loss revenue doesn’t appear to be sound financial planning. All that said, I will write a check simply to retain my right to purchase season tickets. But you do have to wonder what is going on behind the scenes.
    Having a rainy day fund is one thing, but being able to foresee a pandemic that’s going to shut down half the country? How many other schools were ready for this? I’m betting our fan base and alumni will step up to the plate.
    It's peanut butter jelly time!

  12. #12
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    I’m not sure any kind of normal planning would have offset a pandemic that cancelled the NCAA tournament and that large amount of cash, and is likely to drastically limit or eliminate attended games this year. It’s one thing to plan for a rainy day and another to expect then to plan for the effects of the pandemic, especially since the last real one was in 1908


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  13. #13
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    The American college and university sector as a whole is arguably the worst run industry in the country. Sure there are exceptions, GU may be one, but the over reliance on tuition income (enrollment) and the over allocation of expense on personnel, much of it fixed (as high as 75% of all costs) makes for a precarious yearly balance. Research overhead, government support and philanthropy help a little. But with national birth rates having been in decline for years, the worst is yet to come. The top 5% of schools are ok. The rest will scramble.



    Note: Even before the pandemic, higher education was on the precipice. Besides rising costs, unaffordable tuition, and declining student aid and philanthropy, U.S. colleges are facing a major demographic crisis. Many have failed to meet enrollment targets for the entering class and more years like this are on the horizon. Over the next decade, colleges are expected to see a steady decline in enrollments. It’s simple demographics. The nationwide number of high school graduates is declining and will continue to drop through 2029-2030. One early danger sign: A majority of the country’s 3,000 plus four-year colleges now admit “most” of the students who apply.

    Hyper-selective schools are few: Among four-year colleges, 17 admitted fewer than 10% of applicants. Those included Stanford (5%), Harvard (5%), and Yale (7%). An additional 29 schools admitted between 10% and 20% of applicants, such as Georgetown (16%), USC (16%), and Berkeley (17%). Schools accepting 20% or less, however, amount to only 3% of all colleges. More than half (53%) admitted “most,” or two-thirds or more, of all those who applied.
    Last edited by jazzdelmar; 09-24-2020 at 05:37 AM.

  14. #14
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    Gonzaga asking season-ticket holders for assistance, but not requiring it

    https://www.spokesman.com/stories/20...for-assistanc/

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