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Thread: Zags future hoops Unclear PART II

  1. #1
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    Default Zags future hoops Unclear PART II

    I am trying to reopen this thread because I believe it's too important to let disappear. There is some great information on THAT thread, Jim Meehan's article, some info by Go Zags about the Vulkar Center which would be part of the Gonzaga Bubble if selected. I had no idea there was a Vulkar Center gymnasium. There's a nice picture of it on the link that Bob Zag left. It's beautiful and built in 2018, not long ago. So there are 3 gyms, interconnected (thus a bubble). I can see how Gonzaga could be selected to be a Bubble.

    Jim Meehan's article in the Spokesman: https://www.spokesman.com/stories/20...e-game-plan-t/ is a much needed article to read about the future of GU hoops. Here is the link to the Vulkar gymnasium left by Go Zags. As for the Volkar Center (which is attached to K1 and K2) ... please peruse this link
    https://gozags.com/facilities/volkar...achievement/13

    Go Zags!!!
    Go Zags!!! The Best Is Yet To Come!!!

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    Is this for the tourny or for PNW teams to play regular season games?
    Love the zags for life

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zags11 View Post
    Is this for the tourny or for PNW teams to play regular season games?
    From what I read the talk about Gonzaga being a bubble was for the WCC conference games. However, the bubble concept has also been talked about for the NCAA Tournament also. Go ahead and read the article. I left a link to the article in the Spokesman.

    Go Zags!!!
    Go Zags!!! The Best Is Yet To Come!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Reborn View Post
    From what I read the talk about Gonzaga being a bubble was for the WCC conference games. However, the bubble concept has also been talked about for the NCAA Tournament also. Go ahead and read the article. I left a link to the article in the Spokesman.

    Go Zags!!!
    Thanks reborn!!
    Love the zags for life

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    Has anyone asked the rest of the WCC teams? Why would USF, Santa Clara, St. Mary's and Pacific go to Spokane to play in a bubble? And the SoCal teams would travel 1000 miles to be in a bubble? It would make most sense to play in the Bay Area.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DonJuan View Post
    Has anyone asked the rest of the WCC teams? Why would USF, Santa Clara, St. Mary's and Pacific go to Spokane to play in a bubble? And the SoCal teams would travel 1000 miles to be in a bubble? It would make most sense to play in the Bay Area.
    The State of California has been one of the most risk-averse in the country and has had strict criteria for easing social distancing restrictions. They are currently also dealing with an uptick in cases. I personally doubt that the leadership there would have the stomach to create a bubble site unless there is dramatic improvement in the metrics used to monitor the pandemic.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JPtheBeasta View Post
    The State of California has been one of the most risk-averse in the country and has had strict criteria for easing social distancing restrictions. They are currently also dealing with an uptick in cases. I personally doubt that the leadership there would have the stomach to create a bubble site unless there is dramatic improvement in the metrics used to monitor the pandemic.
    I live in the Bay Area, and would be shocked if they permitted something like this. All high school sports are cancelled through the end of 2020, with fall sports moving to the spring, and everything being reshuffled from there.
    I will thank God for the day and the moment I have. - Jimmy V

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    Quote Originally Posted by webspinnre View Post
    I live in the Bay Area, and would be shocked if they permitted something like this. All high school sports are cancelled through the end of 2020, with fall sports moving to the spring, and everything being reshuffled from there.
    Would they let college kids leave to go play somewhere else? I assume a 14 day quarantine would be needed on the back end...

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    I don't think they can stop a kid from doing things outside of California. As for how things are down there, I was in LA 10 days ago speaking. Dead is the word. Dead. Spokane looks like Las Vegas comparatively. Beverly Hills empty. West side LA, very eerily quiet. Sunset Blvd, hardly many cars. Freeways..low activity. But I do think kids and teams can still play, just not in CA.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JPtheBeasta View Post
    Would they let college kids leave to go play somewhere else? I assume a 14 day quarantine would be needed on the back end...
    Rules on that sort of thing change weekly, I've got no idea what that'll end up looking come November, December, or January.
    I will thank God for the day and the moment I have. - Jimmy V

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    Can we just move everyone to Fight island. 300+ teams, 15 games for seeding, and then everyone fights until only one remains. I'm sure they can still do their overpriced zoom classes from the other side of the world.
    Krozman
    GU student 1996-2000
    Law Student 2000-2003

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    Quote Originally Posted by krozman View Post
    Can we just move everyone to Fight island. 300+ teams, 15 games for seeding, and then everyone fights until only one remains. I'm sure they can still do their overpriced zoom classes from the other side of the world.
    I like that idea, as long as the games are played in gigantic steal cages and the winners earn their weight in gasoline and cured meats (it's time for the players to get compensated for what they do)

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    Quote Originally Posted by DonJuan View Post
    Has anyone asked the rest of the WCC teams? Why would USF, Santa Clara, St. Mary's and Pacific go to Spokane to play in a bubble? And the SoCal teams would travel 1000 miles to be in a bubble? It would make most sense to play in the Bay Area.
    There won't be any fans, so there really isn't a 'home' advantage. Gonzaga has access to to multiple courts on campus. There are hotels literally linked to the campus by walkways. Volkar is a great facility to support socially distanced dining along with its court and video facilities. There is no other school in the WCC outside of BYU that can offer that.

    Maybe split the Men and Women teams between BYU and GU.
    'I found it is the small everyday deeds of ordinary folk that keep the darkness at bay… small acts of kindness and love.'
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    I think it's getting really interesting what is going on in D1 football. When the PAC-12 and BigTen announced they were moving football until spring I assumed it would be 1-2 days and everyone would follow, but as of now 6 of 10 conferences (SEC, ACC, Big 12, AAC, Con-USA, and Sun Belt) were still planning on fall football. That is 76 of 130 D1 programs. The 4 conferences pushing football until spring (PAC-12, BigTen, MW, and MAC) with some independents only total 54. If the majority continue forward with fall football, unless it's a total debacle, we should be having basketball on time. What happens with the BCS? Who controls that? Its outside if the NCAA. Do we have a fall and spring national champion? Did the spring conferences cost themselves money from the New Years 6 bowl games? Weird wild stuff.

    https://www.deseret.com/sports/2020/...-mountain-west

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    WCC basketball is mostly supported by ESPN television money, correct? And CBS-SN and ROOT Sports Northwest as well, to some extent. If we have to play without fans, so be it, but at least we can have a season. If Major League Baseball can have a season without fans (albiet, a wacky one), then so can we.

    I have a positive feeling that the Zags will have some kind of season. The NBA is doing the bubble thing, and their playoffs are going on without a hitch. Granted, these players are being paid, but our current Zags are playing for some kind of NBA draft position. If the scouts can't see them play.....................

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    I wonder how much of the basketball uncertainty factored into Banchero going to Duke?

    It seems like the ACC and SEC are playing sports regardless. Who knows?

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    Quote Originally Posted by 23dpg View Post
    I wonder how much of the basketball uncertainty factored into Banchero going to Duke?

    It seems like the ACC and SEC are playing sports regardless. Who knows?
    It COULD be, but he isn't going there THIS season and there is not yet a reason to believe that next season will not be normal.
    It's not funny.

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    Who do I pay to get a cardboard cutout of myself in the kennel?

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    Quote Originally Posted by ZagNut08 View Post
    Who do I pay to get a cardboard cutout of myself in the kennel?
    I don’t know, but I want to see Woohoo and Francis the Goat represented!
    It's peanut butter jelly time!

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    Quote Originally Posted by NotoriousZ View Post
    I don’t know, but I want to see Woohoo and Francis the Goat represented!
    Well, Francis anyway.
    This post is for March Madness seeding purposes only.

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    This came in my email, with no source to link, so I cannot vouch for authenticity, but if true, would be a game changer.

    "New Rapid Saliva Test for COVID-19 Enables Fast and Frequent Testing on a Large Scale


    Illinois rapid saliva test for COVID-19 now operating under FDA Emergency Use Authorization.


    The University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign is now performing its new rapid, saliva-based COVID-19 test under the umbrella of an approved FDA Emergency Use Authorization. The CLIA-certified lab at the U. of I. performed a bridging study to a recently approved FDA EUA, showing that the Illinois test performs at least as well as the recently approved saliva-testing protocol.


    “Direct saliva testing can address bottlenecks of time, cost, and supplies. Our test also has unique features that enable fast and frequent testing on a large scale, and we are now working together with many partners to make our testing method broadly available as soon as possible,” said Dr. Martin Burke, a chemistry professor who helped to design the test. Burke also is the associate dean for research at the Carle Illinois College of Medicine and a medical doctor.


    “Today’s news puts the University of Illinois and the entire state of Illinois on the cutting edge of testing innovation on a national level. And let me just say to President Killeen, the State of Illinois looks forward to being your biggest customer,” said Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker. “If ongoing research continues to yield positive results, this has potentially game-changing implications for our statewide testing program as well as for testing on a national level. I’m so proud — but not at all surprised — to see this type of groundbreaking work come out of our own University of Illinois and I want to applaud President Killeen and the entire research and development team at University of Illinois for this achievement.”


    “This pioneering technology is a game-changer that will help safeguard lives and livelihoods across the country,” said Tim Killeen, the president of the University of Illinois System. “It is one of many breakthroughs that the U. of I. System’s world-class researchers have contributed to the battle against COVID-19, a battle that we are proud to help lead.”


    Unlike most coronavirus tests, which involve a long, invasive nasopharyngeal swab, the Illinois-developed saliva test, called I-COVID, asks those tested to drool a small amount into a sterile test tube. The I-COVID test yields results in hours, even at high testing volumes: The U. of I. has performed more than 50,000 tests since making walk-up testing available to faculty members, staff and students in July, and expects to test up to 20,000 people a day when the fall semester begins Aug. 24.


    “Once somebody is infected, the amount of virus in their system can rise very rapidly. Unless we have a test that can give them results very quickly, by the time somebody finds out they are infected, they will have spread the virus,” said Rebecca Lee Smith, a professor of pathobiology at Illinois. “The faster we can notify people, the faster we can stop the spread.”


    The Illinois protocol has one key element that makes it uniquely suited for large-scale adoption, said Paul Hergenrother, a chemistry professor who helped to develop the test. “We inactivate the virus without opening any tubes. The samples are immediately inactivated at 95 C for 30 minutes. That makes it very safe for the workers in the diagnostic lab,” he said."


    Testing is only one part of the strategy to contain the COVID-19 pandemic, the researchers note. The university has developed SHIELD, a three-pronged “target, test, tell” system that incorporates testing with data reporting, modeling and a smartphone app, working closely with the Champaign-Urbana Public Health District for contact tracing and isolation for individuals who test positive. The University of Illinois System recently announced the formation of SHIELD T3, aimed at making the testing and data technology broadly available.


    Any other CLIA-certified labs that would like to use the I-COVID protocol can perform similar bridging studies to the FDA EUA granted to Yale School of Public Health.


    “The bridge to FDA Emergency Use Authorization is extremely exciting and important news for all of us in this pandemic,” said Robert J. Jones, the chancellor of the Urbana campus. “This is a critical new tool that we believe will let communities scale up their COVID-19 testing capabilities more rapidly in ways that are more affordable. We’re proud to be the university that is home to a huge team of amazingly dedicated and talented researchers who came together so quickly to move this test from concept to use approval in just a matter of months.”


    Found this to support it:

    https://news.illinois.edu/view/6367/1795135071
    It's not funny.

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    Quote Originally Posted by willandi View Post
    This came in my email, with no source to link, so I cannot vouch for authenticity, but if true, would be a game changer.

    "New Rapid Saliva Test for COVID-19 Enables Fast and Frequent Testing on a Large Scale


    Illinois rapid saliva test for COVID-19 now operating under FDA Emergency Use Authorization.


    The University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign is now performing its new rapid, saliva-based COVID-19 test under the umbrella of an approved FDA Emergency Use Authorization. The CLIA-certified lab at the U. of I. performed a bridging study to a recently approved FDA EUA, showing that the Illinois test performs at least as well as the recently approved saliva-testing protocol.


    “Direct saliva testing can address bottlenecks of time, cost, and supplies. Our test also has unique features that enable fast and frequent testing on a large scale, and we are now working together with many partners to make our testing method broadly available as soon as possible,” said Dr. Martin Burke, a chemistry professor who helped to design the test. Burke also is the associate dean for research at the Carle Illinois College of Medicine and a medical doctor.


    “Today’s news puts the University of Illinois and the entire state of Illinois on the cutting edge of testing innovation on a national level. And let me just say to President Killeen, the State of Illinois looks forward to being your biggest customer,” said Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker. “If ongoing research continues to yield positive results, this has potentially game-changing implications for our statewide testing program as well as for testing on a national level. I’m so proud — but not at all surprised — to see this type of groundbreaking work come out of our own University of Illinois and I want to applaud President Killeen and the entire research and development team at University of Illinois for this achievement.”


    “This pioneering technology is a game-changer that will help safeguard lives and livelihoods across the country,” said Tim Killeen, the president of the University of Illinois System. “It is one of many breakthroughs that the U. of I. System’s world-class researchers have contributed to the battle against COVID-19, a battle that we are proud to help lead.”


    Unlike most coronavirus tests, which involve a long, invasive nasopharyngeal swab, the Illinois-developed saliva test, called I-COVID, asks those tested to drool a small amount into a sterile test tube. The I-COVID test yields results in hours, even at high testing volumes: The U. of I. has performed more than 50,000 tests since making walk-up testing available to faculty members, staff and students in July, and expects to test up to 20,000 people a day when the fall semester begins Aug. 24.


    “Once somebody is infected, the amount of virus in their system can rise very rapidly. Unless we have a test that can give them results very quickly, by the time somebody finds out they are infected, they will have spread the virus,” said Rebecca Lee Smith, a professor of pathobiology at Illinois. “The faster we can notify people, the faster we can stop the spread.”


    The Illinois protocol has one key element that makes it uniquely suited for large-scale adoption, said Paul Hergenrother, a chemistry professor who helped to develop the test. “We inactivate the virus without opening any tubes. The samples are immediately inactivated at 95 C for 30 minutes. That makes it very safe for the workers in the diagnostic lab,” he said."


    Testing is only one part of the strategy to contain the COVID-19 pandemic, the researchers note. The university has developed SHIELD, a three-pronged “target, test, tell” system that incorporates testing with data reporting, modeling and a smartphone app, working closely with the Champaign-Urbana Public Health District for contact tracing and isolation for individuals who test positive. The University of Illinois System recently announced the formation of SHIELD T3, aimed at making the testing and data technology broadly available.


    Any other CLIA-certified labs that would like to use the I-COVID protocol can perform similar bridging studies to the FDA EUA granted to Yale School of Public Health.


    “The bridge to FDA Emergency Use Authorization is extremely exciting and important news for all of us in this pandemic,” said Robert J. Jones, the chancellor of the Urbana campus. “This is a critical new tool that we believe will let communities scale up their COVID-19 testing capabilities more rapidly in ways that are more affordable. We’re proud to be the university that is home to a huge team of amazingly dedicated and talented researchers who came together so quickly to move this test from concept to use approval in just a matter of months.”


    Found this to support it:

    https://news.illinois.edu/view/6367/1795135071
    Wow. That's really exciting! A glimmer of hope.

    Thanks for finding that willandi!
    It's not funny.

  23. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by MDABE80 View Post
    I don't think they can stop a kid from doing things outside of California. As for how things are down there, I was in LA 10 days ago speaking. Dead is the word. Dead. Spokane looks like Las Vegas comparatively. Beverly Hills empty. West side LA, very eerily quiet. Sunset Blvd, hardly many cars. Freeways..low activity. But I do think kids and teams can still play, just not in CA.
    I live in LA and i truly wish this picture you painted was true.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by willandi View Post
    This came in my email, with no source to link, so I cannot vouch for authenticity, but if true, would be a game changer.

    "New Rapid Saliva Test for COVID-19 Enables Fast and Frequent Testing on a Large Scale


    Illinois rapid saliva test for COVID-19 now operating under FDA Emergency Use Authorization.


    The University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign is now performing its new rapid, saliva-based COVID-19 test under the umbrella of an approved FDA Emergency Use Authorization. The CLIA-certified lab at the U. of I. performed a bridging study to a recently approved FDA EUA, showing that the Illinois test performs at least as well as the recently approved saliva-testing protocol.


    “Direct saliva testing can address bottlenecks of time, cost, and supplies. Our test also has unique features that enable fast and frequent testing on a large scale, and we are now working together with many partners to make our testing method broadly available as soon as possible,” said Dr. Martin Burke, a chemistry professor who helped to design the test. Burke also is the associate dean for research at the Carle Illinois College of Medicine and a medical doctor.


    “Today’s news puts the University of Illinois and the entire state of Illinois on the cutting edge of testing innovation on a national level. And let me just say to President Killeen, the State of Illinois looks forward to being your biggest customer,” said Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker. “If ongoing research continues to yield positive results, this has potentially game-changing implications for our statewide testing program as well as for testing on a national level. I’m so proud — but not at all surprised — to see this type of groundbreaking work come out of our own University of Illinois and I want to applaud President Killeen and the entire research and development team at University of Illinois for this achievement.”


    “This pioneering technology is a game-changer that will help safeguard lives and livelihoods across the country,” said Tim Killeen, the president of the University of Illinois System. “It is one of many breakthroughs that the U. of I. System’s world-class researchers have contributed to the battle against COVID-19, a battle that we are proud to help lead.”


    Unlike most coronavirus tests, which involve a long, invasive nasopharyngeal swab, the Illinois-developed saliva test, called I-COVID, asks those tested to drool a small amount into a sterile test tube. The I-COVID test yields results in hours, even at high testing volumes: The U. of I. has performed more than 50,000 tests since making walk-up testing available to faculty members, staff and students in July, and expects to test up to 20,000 people a day when the fall semester begins Aug. 24.


    “Once somebody is infected, the amount of virus in their system can rise very rapidly. Unless we have a test that can give them results very quickly, by the time somebody finds out they are infected, they will have spread the virus,” said Rebecca Lee Smith, a professor of pathobiology at Illinois. “The faster we can notify people, the faster we can stop the spread.”


    The Illinois protocol has one key element that makes it uniquely suited for large-scale adoption, said Paul Hergenrother, a chemistry professor who helped to develop the test. “We inactivate the virus without opening any tubes. The samples are immediately inactivated at 95 C for 30 minutes. That makes it very safe for the workers in the diagnostic lab,” he said."


    Testing is only one part of the strategy to contain the COVID-19 pandemic, the researchers note. The university has developed SHIELD, a three-pronged “target, test, tell” system that incorporates testing with data reporting, modeling and a smartphone app, working closely with the Champaign-Urbana Public Health District for contact tracing and isolation for individuals who test positive. The University of Illinois System recently announced the formation of SHIELD T3, aimed at making the testing and data technology broadly available.


    Any other CLIA-certified labs that would like to use the I-COVID protocol can perform similar bridging studies to the FDA EUA granted to Yale School of Public Health.


    “The bridge to FDA Emergency Use Authorization is extremely exciting and important news for all of us in this pandemic,” said Robert J. Jones, the chancellor of the Urbana campus. “This is a critical new tool that we believe will let communities scale up their COVID-19 testing capabilities more rapidly in ways that are more affordable. We’re proud to be the university that is home to a huge team of amazingly dedicated and talented researchers who came together so quickly to move this test from concept to use approval in just a matter of months.”


    Found this to support it:

    https://news.illinois.edu/view/6367/1795135071
    There are other iterations of this test— the SUNY system has one that’s running out of their lab at Upstate, and there was one published on a preprint server (ie not peer-reviewed yet) earlier this month from a group at Yale.

    It’s a game changer for a couple reasons- notably, the sample can be self-collected and doesn’t require any special training to oversee sampling like the nasopharyngeal swabs do. Also, the SUNY test is using pooled samples of up to 24 individuals in a single sample, so more people can be tested rapidly, and as long as the pool comes back negative, everybody is good. If the pool is positive, all 24 people get an individual test. When testing asymptomatic populations, most of the pools should come back negative (with a population rate of 1%, three out of four pools should be negative) - this speeds up the process, reduces costs and need for scarce reagents, and gets rid of some testing bottlenecks as well.

    Hopefully increased testing programs like this will enable in-person classes to continue, as well as a return to some kind of normalcy in sports and other areas.

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