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Thread: Race thread (will be moved on Monday night)

  1. #251
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    Carry on folks. Going for a bike ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Markburn1 View Post
    See Baltimore for recent history when the police stood down.
    No one wants the police to stand down. Read about it man. People are polarizing this issue and are making silly statements that dumb down the issue. The issue is getting the most bang for your buck for police dollars. It doesn't mean abandoning the police department. It's a sliding scale of choices. The police will never be defunded. Come on.

  3. #253
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    Quote Originally Posted by Markburn1 View Post
    Who decides what level of funding is overfunding? Who decides how to redistribute the Budget and what is "FAIR".

    Who will be the one to decide what is criminal and what isn't and which laws to enforce? Is there anybody that is qualified to be a mental health social worker doctor teacher dude?

    We have thrown trillions of dollars at schools, hospitals,services, etc. yet here we are. Again, who decides what is more important than any other program? That's why we have elected officials.

    Your post is platitudes that will work in a perfect society. There isn't one on this planet.
    When I see terms such as "investing" and "funding", it usually means our taxes are going up.

    I don't mean to throw gas on the fire, but I look forward to the day when Black Lives Matter protests against black on black crime.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TexasZagFan View Post
    When I see terms such as "investing" and "funding", it usually means our taxes are going up.

    I don't mean to throw gas on the fire, but I look forward to the day when Black Lives Matter protests against black on black crime.
    When a black civilian kills or assaults another black civilian, the person is arrested, tried and convicted. You can't say the same about when a police officer assaults or kills a black person. BLM started re cop on civilian crime.

    90 percent of black murders are committed by African Americans. 82 percent of white murders are committed by White Americans. For the white Americans concerned about black on black crime perhaps they should focus on white on white crime in their own communities first.

  5. #255
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    Quote Originally Posted by Markburn1 View Post
    Another instance where it's not necessarily racism.

    My wife was pulled over for an equally absurd reason. We had recently purchased a used truck. The previous owner, while putting the tags on the plate each year, put the tab that is left after attaching the sticker on the side of the license plate. Actually looked kind of cool with all the different colors. THAT was the reason he stopped her. He then proceeded to ask her a series of questions about what she was doing, where she was going, where was she before, etc. Then told her to be on her way like nothing happened. She's white.
    Actually that is a valid reason for being pulled over. Tabs are to be in specific area and only the current tab should be visible and old tabs are supposed to be removed. Would have been a weak move had he cited her for the violation. In my example there was zero justification for pulling him over. He had not violated any laws and the cop told him the reason he was pulled over was to let him know his tabs were going to expire in 3 months. This is not standard procedure by any law enforcement agency. It is a pure case of racial profiling and making up a reason to pull him over.

  6. #256
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    Quote Originally Posted by Markburn1 View Post
    Carry on folks. Going for a bike ride.
    Speaking of things that police don't like black people to do...

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    Quote Originally Posted by TexasZagFan View Post
    I don't mean to throw gas on the fire, but I look forward to the day when Black Lives Matter protests against black on black crime.
    BLM's focus and advocacy tends to be less about the crime, and death, as horrible as both of those things are. They aren't really a subject of controversy. In general, perpetrators of violent crimes are prosecuted and punished accordingly.

    The issue at hand for many BLM protestors is more about the lack of response, or lack of convictions, when Black individuals are killed, especially when it comes at the hands of law enforcement. The Ahmaud Arbery and George Floyd cases were troubling not just for the incidents themselves (which were tragic enough) but for the ambivalence and cover-up that initially followed.

  8. #258
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    Quote Originally Posted by Markburn1 View Post
    Will,

    My son is white. Everything that happened at the hospital was EXACTLY what happened to my son and I. Anxiety happens. It’s fairly common and the first thing they need to establish is that no drugs are involved. Parents are sometimes the last to know.

    Blaming her son’s death on racism is wrong. Even blaming it on what might be perceived as incompetence by the nurse practitioners is usually wrong as well.

    Having the thought that burning down the hospital and killing innocent people is way too toxic. Comparing that to looters and rioters doing it ostensibly in George Floyd’s name is insane.
    You get that in the story, her son never had anxiety... and died, right? I suspect your son had anxiety and is still alive. While, yes, checking for drugs makes sense in case he doesn't want to say in front of his mom... but I don't get where she ever said burn the hospital down and yes it was incompetence/bias on the part of the NP.
    "And Morrison? He did what All-Americans do. He shot daggers in the daylight and stole a win." - Steve Kelley (Seattle Times)

    "Gonzaga is a special place, with special people!" - Dan Dickau #21

    Foo me once shame on you, Foo me twice shame on me.

    2012 Foostrodamus - Foothsayer of Death

  9. #259
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    Quote Originally Posted by LongIslandZagFan View Post
    You get that in the story, her son never had anxiety... and died, right? I suspect your son had anxiety and is still alive. While, yes, checking for drugs makes sense in case he doesn't want to say in front of his mom... but I don't get where she ever said burn the hospital down and yes it was incompetence/bias on the part of the NP.
    She did say that she was so angry she thought of burning the hospital down, but she went home to try and contain that anger.
    It's not funny.

  10. #260
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    Quote Originally Posted by willandi View Post
    She did say that she was so angry she thought of burning the hospital down, but she went home to try and contain that anger.
    I missed that... but yeah... I get the anger.
    "And Morrison? He did what All-Americans do. He shot daggers in the daylight and stole a win." - Steve Kelley (Seattle Times)

    "Gonzaga is a special place, with special people!" - Dan Dickau #21

    Foo me once shame on you, Foo me twice shame on me.

    2012 Foostrodamus - Foothsayer of Death

  11. #261
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    Quote Originally Posted by scrooner View Post
    Speaking of things that police don't like black people to do...
    Really??? You have some sort of insight on that?

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    In 2003, Fort Lauderdale began requiring residents to register their bicycles with the city, aiming to make stolen bicycles harder to sell and easier to recover. City commissioners say that the policy resulted in a bike theft decrease, though a lot of people didn’t bother or didn’t know to register their bikes, and the stolen bike trade around the Broward Central Bus Terminal continued at a brisk pace.

    But the bike registry program did have one noteworthy effect: It gave Ft. Lauderdale police the perfect excuse to start pulling over cyclists the same way that they did drivers — to check their registration. If the bike was unregistered, they could ticket the cyclist and impound the bike.

    And lo, this came to pass — but only in certain neighborhoods. When the Broward Palm Beach New Times crunched numbers compiled by the Public Defender’s Office in October 2013, the paper found that the vast majority of tickets handed out by police over the past three years had been given to African Americans. The stories behind those tickets were alarming; in one case, police pulled over a woman leaving a party late at night, wrote her a ticket, took her bike, and left her to find her own way home through a dangerous neighborhood.

    Almost none of the tickets were handed out in predominantly white neighborhoods, despite the fact that the majority of Fort Lauderdale residents who had actually gone to the effort of registering their bikes were black.
    https://grist.org/cities/biking-whil...s-a-thing-too/


    f the tickets are any indication, Tampa residents must be the lousiest bicyclists in Florida. They don't use lights at night. Don't ride close enough to the curb. Can't manage to keep their hands on the handlebars.

    In the past three years, Tampa police have written 2,504 bike tickets — more than Jacksonville, Miami, St. Petersburg and Orlando combined. Police say they are gung ho about bike safety and focused on stopping a plague of bike thefts. But here's something they don't mention about the people they ticket: Eight out of 10 are black.

    A Tampa Bay Times investigation has found that Tampa police are targeting poor, black neighborhoods with obscure subsections of a Florida statute that outlaws things most people have tried on a bike, like riding with no light or carrying a friend on the handlebars. Officers use these minor violations as an excuse to stop, question and search almost anyone on wheels. The department doesn't just condone these stops, it encourages them, pushing officers who patrol high-crime neighborhoods to do as many as possible.
    https://www.tampabay.com/news/public...black/2225966/

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    Quote Originally Posted by Markburn1 View Post
    Really??? You have some sort of insight on that?
    Read the Sam Dower article I posted above. This experience is common. If you're a black male, and you're doing virtually anything in public you're under suspicion by police, generally. You want statistics? You can find them easily. You think those statistics are misleading and you want anecdotes, ask any black person. If the response is "well the same thing happened to me once and I'm a white man..." and you don't believe the anecdotes or the pain in people's voices or eyes about the experience that white people mitigate, ignore and disregard, well perhaps you need to give your head a shake and tap into what Gonzaga University calls "Jesuit Values" and critical thought and ask yourself why the gut reaction is skepticism and disbelief.

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    "Our platform was built around the sport in which a majority of players are black[.]" I feel like some people in this thread need that reminder. Once that's clear, then make a good-faith effort to see the world through their collective experience. It's easy to espouse views that are congruent with your own self-interest. Empathy occurs when you process another's circumstances; a scared cop called into support another jurisdiction during a riot with a partner and kids anxiously waiting at home, a black recruit who is excited to play for the Zags, but sees star and bars displayed throughout the Idaho panhandle, a Mayor who has to reconcile his constituents impassioned positions with his/her own department's enforcement prerogative to keep people and businesses safe. Y'all just took to your corners. The only reason we remain civil is because we know we want to post here after this thread dies. If this was Facebook or some other platform, we would have devolved into the same sh*t slinging the rest of the internet does. I'm sorry to say I don't see the makings of empathy and civility here. Will anyone at least pretend to see things from another's prospective?

    https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcas...=1000476556884
    Quote Originally Posted by Reborn View Post
    Go Zags!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by zagdontzig View Post
    "Our platform was built around the sport in which a majority of players are black[.]" I feel like some people in this thread need that reminder. Once that's clear, then make a good-faith effort to see the world through their collective experience. It's easy to espouse views that are congruent with your own self-interest. Empathy occurs when you process another's circumstances; a scared cop called into support another jurisdiction during a riot with a partner and kids anxiously waiting at home, a black recruit who is excited to play for the Zags, but sees star and bars displayed throughout the Idaho panhandle, a Mayor who has to reconcile his constituents impassioned positions with his/her own department's enforcement prerogative to keep people and businesses safe. Y'all just took to your corners. The only reason we remain civil is because we know we want to post here after this thread dies. If this was Facebook or some other platform, we would have devolved into the same sh*t slinging the rest of the internet does. I'm sorry to say I don't see the makings of empathy and civility here. Will anyone at least pretend to see things from another's prospective?

    https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcas...=1000476556884
    Maybe you're being diplomatic, but no one here is saying things like all cops are racists, the police are inherently bad, the mayor is corrupt. I don't think any of these things. The reason I'm posting here is because if I can enlighten a single person about what it means to be black in America in 2020 I think that's really wonderful. This is the first step to empathy and understanding.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CB4 View Post
    Maybe you're being diplomatic, but no one here is saying things like all cops are racists, the police are inherently bad, the mayor is corrupt. I don't think any of these things. The reason I'm posting here is because if I can enlighten a single person about what it means to be black in America in 2020 I think that's really wonderful. This is the first step to empathy and understanding.
    I disagree. Everyone in this thread is trying to enlighten the others to their own views, resulting in everyone putting their own anecdotes here and talking past each other. No one is considering another's life experience, and trying to achieve the challenging task of reconciling it with their own.

    I happen to agree with your positions broadly, but I am not promoting it here. I am promoting a perpetual open mind on the issues.
    Quote Originally Posted by Reborn View Post
    Go Zags!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by CB4 View Post
    Maybe you're being diplomatic, but no one here is saying things like all cops are racists, the police are inherently bad, the mayor is corrupt. I don't think any of these things. The reason I'm posting here is because if I can enlighten a single person about what it means to be black in America in 2020 I think that's really wonderful. This is the first step to empathy and understanding.
    I'm assuming you're black?

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    I’ve coached the kids for decades and been with their parents on many a road trip. Conversation has extended into the wee hours. Is there racism? Yes. Not nearly to the extent some of you believe.

    I’ve been in the gyms. Taken all kinds of kids with all kinds of backgrounds to restaurants, amusement parks and any number of public places. I’ve been in their homes, they are always welcome in mine, gone to their schools, offered support both financial and emotional. Don’t tell me I don’t have empathy and that I don’t recognize racism when I see it. I simply don’t think every sleight is automatically racism.

    The cop that killed George Floyd is a disgusting piece of crap. More than likely a racist. That’s a given and you will find very few people that disagree with that assessment. Having said that, ascribing every little sideways glance to racism and believing entire police forces are racist is a dead end.

  20. #270
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    Quote Originally Posted by CB4 View Post
    Maybe you're being diplomatic, but no one here is saying things like all cops are racists, the police are inherently bad, the mayor is corrupt. I don't think any of these things. The reason I'm posting here is because if I can enlighten a single person about what it means to be black in America in 2020 I think that's really wonderful. This is the first step to empathy and understanding.
    empathy and understanding can come in a variety of fashions

    you dont need to convince me, but we can probably agree to disagree on the extent and level racism exists across all lines.....I dont see it as bad as some try to put it out to be....I see each person for who they are not what color skin, how much money they do or dont have or any other shallow excuse for judgement......character matters in my book

    My life story in short:
    Grew up among Filipinos and native american population considered to be life long friends
    Had a father who prosecuted a dirty cop for murder
    Told my old man was going to be an ethical cop to make him proud (he still upset I didnt become an attorney...heee hee)
    Became a cop at ripe old age of 21 years and 45 days.....
    First serious call was capital hill 21/cherry gang shooting....I was assigned to ride with the victim to harborview...about passed out when they cut him open and did open heart massage...he died and I was left trying to console his mother

    Coached at a small inner city school football and basketball for many years and worked to help youngsters know they can achieve what they want to achieve

    Had a rape suspect try to throw me off a 4th floor balcony as he and I fought for our lives, destroyed my left pinky and to this day it does not function all because I interrupted him raping an african american lady (she still sends me Christmas cards to this day)

    Held an african american lady in my arms for well over 30 minutes after trying to rescue her drowned son

    Have had the media put false narratives about who I was "racist cop" for stopping Coach Bickerstaff's daughter and making her lie in the snow (suspects in a murder who she grew up with had picked her up at airport and was bringing her home, she was NOT involved but we had to conduct felony car stop due to the circumstances

    Had the unfortunate encounter with a felon who tried to kill several officers with a firearm and was forced to put an end to this evil act (and yes it cost me a job recently where a school district did not want to hire me because of this legal act of protecting others was committed by a white male against a black male....told to me directly after claiming I was the most qualified person for the job but just could not get past the potential political fallout it could create)

    On the personal side:
    Have a daughter who is adopted from Bogata Columbia and was raised in a very rural town

    Have had the "talk" with each of my 4 children about how to respect authority, how to behave pulled over (unfortunately I have also had to demonstrate this behavior 3 times getting a ticket twice) and now have had the talk with my granddaughter

    Have 2 african american grandchildren who are the light of my life and I want them to know and love this country and understand they can do whatever they want to in life and to let no one tell them otherwise
    But recently she told me her friends think I am a pig....even though they have not met me and she broke down crying over this

    Have had to have SEVERAL heart to heart discussions with my eldest granddaughter.....explaining why her grandpa was on a violent crimes task force and had to arrest her father for armed robbery and attempted murder
    Have had to take my granddaughter to prison to see her father
    Just last week supported her in a visitation with her father now that he is out of prison and has or is trying to make a go of life in a positive manner

    empathy and understanding can come in a variety of ways or means.......for me the bottom line is what kind of person you are....if your honest, ethical, treat others with dignity and respect you get that in return( and a good cold beer and if we really hit it off whiskey and cigars to help us further enhance our dialogue)...way too many people in this world to stop and worry about someone who may not like me because of this or that reason take it elsewhere........


    and yes there are many currently calling ALL police pigs, racists, fascist and other names that cannot be repeated, just the other day in Washington DC a group of law makers indicated that there is systemic racism in law enforcement...."of the whole" when you use the word systemic so yes they called me racist even thought they have never met me.....and there are some that are looking for ways to heal the country, provide constructive dialogue and engage in the marginalized to be productive engaged people

    America was a dream, a unique vision and while we are the best in the world for all (IMO), we still have room to improve....as the old man tells me if you are happy with status quo the world will speed past you...change for the better is good change.....
    Basketball...The Toy Department of Life

    Don't mess wth happy...Coach Few

  21. #271
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    Quote Originally Posted by zagdontzig View Post
    "Our platform was built around the sport in which a majority of players are black[.]" I feel like some people in this thread need that reminder. Once that's clear, then make a good-faith effort to see the world through their collective experience. It's easy to espouse views that are congruent with your own self-interest. Empathy occurs when you process another's circumstances; a scared cop called into support another jurisdiction during a riot with a partner and kids anxiously waiting at home, a black recruit who is excited to play for the Zags, but sees star and bars displayed throughout the Idaho panhandle, a Mayor who has to reconcile his constituents impassioned positions with his/her own department's enforcement prerogative to keep people and businesses safe. Y'all just took to your corners. The only reason we remain civil is because we know we want to post here after this thread dies. If this was Facebook or some other platform, we would have devolved into the same sh*t slinging the rest of the internet does. I'm sorry to say I don't see the makings of empathy and civility here. Will anyone at least pretend to see things from another's prospective?

    https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcas...=1000476556884
    It’s weird. Apparently I’ve had blinders on for most of my life. I remember Growing up on entertainment where shows like The Jefferson’s and Cosby were watched by households all over America. Oprah became a national icon. Loving movies and actors like Denzel, Eddie Murphy and Will Smith to name a few. Loving the NBA and the NFL. Loving certain players and Teams and never once thinking about race. Thinking Halle Berry was the most beautiful woman alive. I think the reason most people never thought about race is because we were taught not to. Content of character over the color of someone’s skin. Now, we must consider race or it cheapens someone’s life experience. I think most people have always thought Black lives mattered before it was a slogan and if they didn’t stop to consider what life was like for a black person it was only because they were too busy trying to survive their own life. It’s hard to think of privilege when life is a grind. When loved ones get sick and die. My father for example had a childhood I wouldn’t wish on anyone. For someone to say that it was the color of his skin that allowed him to overcome the challenges he faced in his life denigrates all of his struggles. Most people abhor racism, poverty, inequality. The ability to recognize it though is far different than the feeling that you have any power to change it. I can only control me. I don’t want to control how someone else thinks and there’s a danger in wanting to control. There's a danger in shouting down or shaming someone for what you perceive is in their heart. My worry is that this movement has “fear” baked into saying and doing what should be said and done. It only requires fake empathy or the appearance of caring so people can get on with their lives.

  22. #272
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hoopaholic View Post
    empathy and understanding can come in a variety of fashions

    you dont need to convince me, but we can probably agree to disagree on the extent and level racism exists across all lines.....I dont see it as bad as some try to put it out to be....I see each person for who they are not what color skin, how much money they do or dont have or any other shallow excuse for judgement......character matters in my book

    My life story in short:
    Grew up among Filipinos and native american population considered to be life long friends
    Had a father who prosecuted a dirty cop for murder
    Told my old man was going to be an ethical cop to make him proud (he still upset I didnt become an attorney...heee hee)
    Became a cop at ripe old age of 21 years and 45 days.....
    First serious call was capital hill 21/cherry gang shooting....I was assigned to ride with the victim to harborview...about passed out when they cut him open and did open heart massage...he died and I was left trying to console his mother

    Coached at a small inner city school football and basketball for many years and worked to help youngsters know they can achieve what they want to achieve

    Had a rape suspect try to throw me off a 4th floor balcony as he and I fought for our lives, destroyed my left pinky and to this day it does not function all because I interrupted him raping an african american lady (she still sends me Christmas cards to this day)

    Held an african american lady in my arms for well over 30 minutes after trying to rescue her drowned son

    Have had the media put false narratives about who I was "racist cop" for stopping Coach Bickerstaff's daughter and making her lie in the snow (suspects in a murder who she grew up with had picked her up at airport and was bringing her home, she was NOT involved but we had to conduct felony car stop due to the circumstances

    Had the unfortunate encounter with a felon who tried to kill several officers with a firearm and was forced to put an end to this evil act (and yes it cost me a job recently where a school district did not want to hire me because of this legal act of protecting others was committed by a white male against a black male....told to me directly after claiming I was the most qualified person for the job but just could not get past the potential political fallout it could create)

    On the personal side:
    Have a daughter who is adopted from Bogata Columbia and was raised in a very rural town

    Have had the "talk" with each of my 4 children about how to respect authority, how to behave pulled over (unfortunately I have also had to demonstrate this behavior 3 times getting a ticket twice) and now have had the talk with my granddaughter

    Have 2 african american grandchildren who are the light of my life and I want them to know and love this country and understand they can do whatever they want to in life and to let no one tell them otherwise
    But recently she told me her friends think I am a pig....even though they have not met me and she broke down crying over this

    Have had to have SEVERAL heart to heart discussions with my eldest granddaughter.....explaining why her grandpa was on a violent crimes task force and had to arrest her father for armed robbery and attempted murder
    Have had to take my granddaughter to prison to see her father
    Just last week supported her in a visitation with her father now that he is out of prison and has or is trying to make a go of life in a positive manner

    empathy and understanding can come in a variety of ways or means.......for me the bottom line is what kind of person you are....if your honest, ethical, treat others with dignity and respect you get that in return( and a good cold beer and if we really hit it off whiskey and cigars to help us further enhance our dialogue)...way too many people in this world to stop and worry about someone who may not like me because of this or that reason take it elsewhere........


    and yes there are many currently calling ALL police pigs, racists, fascist and other names that cannot be repeated, just the other day in Washington DC a group of law makers indicated that there is systemic racism in law enforcement...."of the whole" when you use the word systemic so yes they called me racist even thought they have never met me.....and there are some that are looking for ways to heal the country, provide constructive dialogue and engage in the marginalized to be productive engaged people

    America was a dream, a unique vision and while we are the best in the world for all (IMO), we still have room to improve....as the old man tells me if you are happy with status quo the world will speed past you...change for the better is good change.....
    I'm virtually speechless. Great post, thanks for all you've done.

    I arrived at my first unit in January '77. There was a race riot in our barracks the previous weekend, which included a white soldier being locked in a wall locker, and tossed out a second story window. Fortunately, he was not injured. Air Defense Artillery at that time was roughly 1/3 white, 1/3 black, 1/3 Hispanic. Recruiting standards were definitely relaxed in those days, it was early in the era of an all volunteer force.

    I don't have too many "war stories" to tell, except to say I was honored to serve with my fellow soldiers in that battalion.

    I'll just leave it at that.

  23. #273
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    I am venting without having read this thread. Back in the 60's I was an education major. I finished the required classes and only then to learn that the mission statement of education had changed to " enculturate the students into middle class values" I was interested in educating the youth but that was not to be. If that is the mission statement then we should not call them educational schools but should call them cultural schools. Thru the years I have seen the effects of this policy, whereby my own children were taught by rote memory with shops and creativity curtailed and politically correct speaking rewarded.
    Thru my life span I have been angry at individuals of almost every race. That does not make me a racist. I can get mad for a number of reasons regardless of race. I also have good friends of almost every race. As Mark Twain said " a stranger is a friend I have not met yet" No racial overtones should be given about my words. I am not a racist I am merely a human being.
    If you want to be happy tomorrow, think good thoughts today--Bud Fisher


    .
    .

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    Quote Originally Posted by ZagHouse View Post
    It’s weird. Apparently I’ve had blinders on for most of my life. I remember Growing up on entertainment where shows like The Jefferson’s and Cosby were watched by households all over America. Oprah became a national icon. Loving movies and actors like Denzel, Eddie Murphy and Will Smith to name a few. Loving the NBA and the NFL. Loving certain players and Teams and never once thinking about race. Thinking Halle Berry was the most beautiful woman alive. I think the reason most people never thought about race is because we were taught not to. Content of character over the color of someone’s skin. Now, we must consider race or it cheapens someone’s life experience. I think most people have always thought Black lives mattered before it was a slogan and if they didn’t stop to consider what life was like for a black person it was only because they were too busy trying to survive their own life. It’s hard to think of privilege when life is a grind. When loved ones get sick and die. My father for example had a childhood I wouldn’t wish on anyone. For someone to say that it was the color of his skin that allowed him to overcome the challenges he faced in his life denigrates all of his struggles. Most people abhor racism, poverty, inequality. The ability to recognize it though is far different than the feeling that you have any power to change it. I can only control me. I don’t want to control how someone else thinks and there’s a danger in wanting to control. There's a danger in shouting down or shaming someone for what you perceive is in their heart. My worry is that this movement has “fear” baked into saying and doing what should be said and done. It only requires fake empathy or the appearance of caring so people can get on with their lives.
    Forgive me but I'm not following. Can you dumb it down for me?
    Quote Originally Posted by Reborn View Post
    Go Zags!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by ZagHouse View Post
    It’s weird. Apparently I’ve had blinders on for most of my life. I remember Growing up on entertainment where shows like The Jefferson’s and Cosby were watched by households all over America. Oprah became a national icon. Loving movies and actors like Denzel, Eddie Murphy and Will Smith to name a few. Loving the NBA and the NFL. Loving certain players and Teams and never once thinking about race. Thinking Halle Berry was the most beautiful woman alive. I think the reason most people never thought about race is because we were taught not to. Content of character over the color of someone’s skin. Now, we must consider race or it cheapens someone’s life experience. OK. I think most people have always thought Black lives mattered before it was a slogan and if they didn’t stop to consider what life was like for a black person it was only because they were too busy trying to survive their own life. It’s hard to think of privilege when life is a grind. When loved ones get sick and die. My father for example had a childhood I wouldn’t wish on anyone. For someone to say that it was the color of his skin that allowed him to overcome the challenges he faced in his life denigrates all of his struggles. Most people abhor racism, poverty, inequality. The ability to recognize it though is far different than the feeling that you have any power to change it. I can only control me. I don’t want to control how someone else thinks and there’s a danger in wanting to control. There a danger in shouting down or shaming someone for what you perceive is in their heart. My worry is that this movement has “fear” baked into saying and doing what should be said and done. It only requires fake empathy or the appearance of caring so people can get on with their lives.
    ZagHouse, you left out Blazing Saddles...was that on purpose?

    Man, there was some crazy stuff that went on at GU in the 70s. I recall being one of the "lab rats" for a couple of sociology students, one black, one Asian.

    I was in the bookstore buying books, when the two soc students started shouting common racial epithets at each other, albeit with a smile on their faces. The first couple of times, I was looking for a place to hide. Unfortunately, the bookstore wasn't much larger than a telephone booth back then. This went on for another minute or so, and we caught onto the game they were playing with us.

    I just don't think that could happen today, and boy am I glad I chose Gonzaga over UCLA (my second choice).

    UCLA Professor Under Police Protection Following Threats
    A college professor is living under police protection after rebuffing a request to exempt minority students from taking final exams in the wake of George Floyd's death.
    https://freebeacon.com/latest-news/u...owing-threats/

    Please tell me this couldn't happen at Gonzaga.

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