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Thread: NCAA Won't Mandate Uniform Return to College Sports

  1. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkipZag View Post
    Bigfooot... I bit on the first line.

    ZD... not sure on the vaccine but with this virus, we have a whole lot of groups working on a vaccine where with HIV I’m not sure. So I’m not sure if you can compare the two.

    Go Zags!!
    Somehow, I missed your post. If you want some perspective on HIV compared to COVID-19, I highly recommend you read this article from Scientific American:

    Lessons for COVID-19 from the Early Days of AIDS: A pioneer in the fight against HIV reflects on the dangers of excess optimism about a coronavirus vaccine

    (I will admittedly confess, that in the late 80s, having spent many hours in the top virology lab in our state, that we would have an HIV vaccine, "in five years, tops." Thirty six years later, we're still waiting. Father, forgive me....)

  2. #127

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    The NCAA’s highest-ranking basketball executive has floated the idea to conference leaders about accelerating the start of the men’s basketball season, moving it up two weeks to increase scheduling flexibility and get more games played in event of a winter interruption.

    NCAA senior vice president of basketball Dan Gavitt told Sports Illustrated on Monday that he has proposed moving season-opening games from Nov. 10 to Oct. 27, with perhaps a corresponding acceleration of practice from the currently scheduled start date of Sept. 29. The goal is for schools to play something closer to a full slate of regular-season games amid what could be an uncertain collegiate school year both academically and athletically, as campuses search for ways to deal with COVID-19 fallout.

    “At this point it’s just a concept,” Gavitt said. “But we have presented it to the conference commissioners and the oversight committees. The ball is in their court. It has some utility, adds some flexibility and options with the (academic) calendar changing, which could affect the break period.”

    With dozens of schools shutting down campus between Thanksgiving and the start of second-semester courses in January, Gavitt said it is “almost a certainty” that some basketball games scheduled for that window will be canceled. The optics of leaving winter sports teams on campus for six weeks or more while their fellow students are home is an issue, and there are concerns about traveling for several non-conference games during that time. That could result in schools sending their basketball teams home during the break as well, possibly eliminating anywhere from eight to 12 games and truncating the season.

  3. #128
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZAGS ATTACK BASKET View Post
    The NCAA’s highest-ranking basketball executive has floated the idea to conference leaders about accelerating the start of the men’s basketball season, moving it up two weeks to increase scheduling flexibility and get more games played in event of a winter interruption.

    NCAA senior vice president of basketball Dan Gavitt told Sports Illustrated on Monday that he has proposed moving season-opening games from Nov. 10 to Oct. 27, with perhaps a corresponding acceleration of practice from the currently scheduled start date of Sept. 29. The goal is for schools to play something closer to a full slate of regular-season games amid what could be an uncertain collegiate school year both academically and athletically, as campuses search for ways to deal with COVID-19 fallout.

    “At this point it’s just a concept,” Gavitt said. “But we have presented it to the conference commissioners and the oversight committees. The ball is in their court. It has some utility, adds some flexibility and options with the (academic) calendar changing, which could affect the break period.”

    With dozens of schools shutting down campus between Thanksgiving and the start of second-semester courses in January, Gavitt said it is “almost a certainty” that some basketball games scheduled for that window will be canceled. The optics of leaving winter sports teams on campus for six weeks or more while their fellow students are home is an issue, and there are concerns about traveling for several non-conference games during that time. That could result in schools sending their basketball teams home during the break as well, possibly eliminating anywhere from eight to 12 games and truncating the season.
    Interesting. I would do it completely opposite. I would try to pack the games into the break between Thanksgiving and second semester. That would maximize control of the environment and safety and make reducing/eliminating fans much more doable.
    'I found it is the small everyday deeds of ordinary folk that keep the darkness at bay… small acts of kindness and love.'
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  4. #129

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    Had a uptick in deaths reported today for Covid-19 in the US. We had 22 states report double digit deaths today thus far.

    One state with a huge surge was Arizona who reported 117 deaths today.. Florida reported 63 deaths, Miss. 44, NJ 42, Ohio 39, ILL 37, Texas 36, Pennsylvania 35.

    Spokane hospitals now have 23 Covid-19 patients, another uptick in patients.

  5. #130
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    It's not funny.

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    Thanks Willandi

    I just don't get those people who chose not to wear a mask, demand to enter an establishment which requires a mask, then throw a temper tantrum fit for a 2-year old when the store tells them to wear a mask or leave. Most of us saw the video of the family trashing the Grocery Outlet when they were told to leave. The Safeway and Fred Meyer we visit both have had to call the police because of patrons trashing their stores when told to leave. We watched a 40-something couple try to bully a young women guarding the entry at DeLeon's to come in. She told them she could not let them in without a mask. As they continued their verbal assault, we started to walk over to assist the young women when a young man, who obviously was a bouncer in a former (or current) life, asked the couple if they had a problem. When told in the negative, he then escorted them to their car.

    These people continue to insist on that it is their constitutional right to not wear a mask, while totally ignoring the rights of the proprietor to require the wearing of a mask or refuse service.

    Absolutely Amazing.

    ZagDad

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    "Is COVID-19 even subject to herd immunity?"

    "On June 26, Dr. Anthony Fauci announced it's "unlikely" that a COVID-19 vaccine with 70-75% efficacy taken by two-thirds of Americans can provide herd immunity to the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus."

    "Approximately 2.74 million Americans have tested positive for the coronavirus, over 130,000 of which have died (case fatality of 4.74%). By contrast, the case fatality of the flu in the U.S. is roughly 0.1%."

    "Absent the existence of a COVID-19 vaccine, any reasonable extrapolation of the data -- even at half the current case fatality rate, means we will see a seven-figure body count that exceeds 5 million deaths before we can attain herd immunity."

    From ABCnews.go.com:
    https://abcnews.go.com/US/vaccine-re...e_hero_related
    It's not funny.

  8. #133

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    Covid-19 sharp rise in US deaths the last 2 days. 993 deaths reported yesterday, and 821 deaths reported so far today.

    California 119 deaths and Texas 103 deaths had major increases today.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ZAGS ATTACK BASKET View Post
    Covid-19 sharp rise in US deaths the last 2 days. 993 deaths reported yesterday, and 821 deaths reported so far today.

    California 119 deaths and Texas 103 deaths had major increases today.
    I'm starting to think you have an unhealthy obsession with reporting the daily death totals. What are you accomplishing with that?

  10. #135
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    Quote Originally Posted by seacatfan View Post
    I'm starting to think you have an unhealthy obsession with reporting the daily death totals. What are you accomplishing with that?
    Some people have an unhealthy obsession for ignoring how many people are dying.

    I prefer to face life with the facts.
    It's not funny.

  11. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by seacatfan View Post
    I'm starting to think you have an unhealthy obsession with reporting the daily death totals. What are you accomplishing with that?


    Probably for the same reason we all post updates in "other games" threads.




  12. #137
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    Default Your Mask Cuts Own Risk by 65 Percent

    In light of new information since the start of this pandemic, UC Davis experts report that Your Mask Cuts Own Risk by 65 Percent:

    Scientific evidence is clear: Social distancing and wearing masks help prevent people from spreading COVID-19, and masks also protect those who wear them, two UC Davis Health experts said on UC Davis LIVE: COVID-19.

    A range of new research on face coverings shows that the risk of infection to the wearer is decreased by 65 percent, said Dean Blumberg, chief of pediatric infectious diseases at UC Davis Children’s Hospital.

    “On the issue of masks, I’d like to restart — because we’ve learned a lot,” Blumberg said. “We’ve learned more due to research and additional scientific evidence. What we know now is that masks work and are very important.”

  13. #138
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    Last post of the night. I feel for this guy as his thoughts parallel mine from a teaching hospital perspective. If you didn't know, at the end of June into July, across the country there are new interns (baby doctors), fresh out of medical school, that are manning the wards and ICUs of every university-related hospital. It's terrifying enough when, as an intern, you have to care for regular patients on a cardiac ward in the middle of the night. In the present time, it's so much more scary having to deal with COVID-19. This doctor presents his harrowing experience in Southern California. I will annotate in red to clarify things that some might not know the medical definitions. He speaks from the heart, as many healthcare professionals are afraid to do, for fear of their jobs. He's brave.





    "I'm in a hotspot hospital in a hotspot region (Coachella Valley, Inland Empire, CA). We just converted the entire second floor of our hospital to COVID-19 care yesterday, July 1. We have 65 inpatients with COVID-19 in a hospital with 368 beds. It is the same at our other 2 hospitals in the Valley. We spent yesterday deciding the ethical way to divide up limited remdesivir [an anti-viral medication] (30 patients' worth) for the hospital patients. My 20 incoming interns for our IM [Internal Medicine] resident were exposed to COVID 2 weeks ago during their computer chart training; apparently 100% of our computer trainers had COVID19. One intern tested positive 7 days later and I insisted we re-test them all again, as there are almost certainly other cases with minimal symptoms. I raided my household and took my entire supply of face shields to the hospital for the residents to wear on their first day, and I paid $1000 of my own money to equip all of my residents with medical-grade face shields. I require all residents to wear a surgical mask or N95 with face shield if they are within 6 feet of another human, patient or coworker.

    Roughly 20% of our inpatients die. Only 30% of our ventilated patients survive. (We try to avoid ventilation at all costs. Some people insist on being full code and decompensate despite high flow with face mask, proning, dexamethasone, antibiotics, and a cocktail of famotidine [a stomach acid pill], zinc, Vitamin D, Vitamin C, NAC [N-acetyl cysteine, basically a vitamin], and melatonin--we throw everything we can at each case, so long as it won't hurt them.)

    My administrative assistant, who sits adjacent to the interns, just went home with COVID symptoms. Her test is pending.

    In the Southwest, we are experiencing catastrophic exponential growth. I have had multiple families--siblings, parent-child, spouses--admitted with COVID-19. I had a 31 year old come in satting 78% [oxygen saturation -- below 93 is bad] on room air; he had been sequestering himself in his bedroom for a week to avoid infecting his elderly parents, with whom he lived. His sister, the only person he saw outside his immediate household in the 10 days prior to onset of fever, cough, and dyspnea [shortness of breath], had also had fevers but had tested "negative" at our other large hospital so he thought it was safe to visit her. (Sigh. The Quest PCR [polymerase chain-reaction -- the up the nose swab] test is about 80% sensitive [sensitivity is the % chance of having a positive result when a patient is actually positive -- 80% is TERRIBLE], we think--it had emergency approval, so sensitivity data was not required. The Cepheid rapid COVID PCR test is 98.5% sensitive but is in short supply due to limited reagent [chemicals needed for the test] availability.)

    I'm glad some of you are sheltered from what unbridled COVID-19 looks like. It's a hell show. This is July. What do you think my hospital will look like in winter?…

    This is real. Doctors in places with proper public health responses will see few cases in their hospitals--like UCSF [U. California San Francisco] --but let me tell you something: The laws of physics and biology don't change. If you're in an unaffected region, an introduction and poor governance and low use of physical distancing and masks will give you an exponential increase in no time flat (i.e. 2-4 weeks). That's pandemic math. And 20% of the population infected needs a hospital. You will run out of beds with an unbridled pandemic. There is almost ZERO pre-existing immunity to SARS-CoV-2. There may be some "priming" of T-cell responses due to exposure to other "benign" beta-coronaviruses, but we have no idea if that explains the 20-40% of people who seem to get minimal symptoms. Asymptomatic infected persons, however, can, and do, spread COVID to those who die from it.

    By the way: I've seen scary looking CT scans of the lungs that look like terrible interstitial pneumonia in a patient who had ZERO symptoms and SaO2 [oxygen saturation] 94% on room air. She came in for palpitations [feelings of heartbeat irregularity] and the intern overnight got a chest CT for cardiac reasons. We didn't know it was COVID until her test came back 36 hours later. So "asymptomatic" does NOT mean "no biological activity." The virus replicates furiously in people who feel fine. Kids can spread this as easily as grown ups, even if they feel okay.

    Related: I've talked to two previously healthy patients ages 32 and 44 who are 3 and 4 months, respectively, post their acute COVID. They continue to have cough, nightsweats, fever, fatigue. How many survivors have "post-COVID syndrome"? We don't know. Less than 20% but we're not sure. I've asked my hospital to allow me to establish a post-COVID clinic to care for and study survivors. Both NIH and UW are planning similar efforts based on my dialogues with them.

    Autopsies show anoxic [no oxygen] brain injury in many patients who died of COVID, not to mention microthrombi [small clots in blood vessels] throughout the lungs and megakaryocytes [a type of immune (white blood) cell] in massive infiltrations in their hearts and other organs. People get heart failure, lung fibrosis [scarring], and permanent kidney injury from COVID-19. This is a disease of the vascular systems [blood vessels], and it can affect any organ, with lungs and kidneys being especially at risk.

    In early May, thanks to lockdown, our census of 55 came down to 10 COVID cases, and for a brief moment, I actually had hope that the worst nightmares I had about COVID, as a biohazard virology-trained hospitalist, would not come to pass. Then we re-opened, without test/trace/isolate systems anywhere close to adequate. Eight weeks ago my county decided to make masks "optional," despite 125 doctors begging them not to do that. Now we're worse than we were in April. And it's getting worse every day.

    You wanna see if COVID is real? Come walk on my COVID ward with me. It's real. Hearing people talk about it as if it's an exaggeration is, well, rage-inducing, honestly. Denial is the most common reaction to a pandemic. Denial is how the US will wind up with 1.1 million deaths instead of 30,000. I saw AIDS denialists get killed by their belief that HIV "isn't real, it's a pharma conspiracy of the medical industrial complex." Yeah, right, if you say so. I watched patients with those beliefs die.

    The hardest part about this is, every new case I treat exposes me. I have assiduous hot zone technique. But no technique is bulletproof. If you keep exposing me to case after case, eventually, the virus will get through my defenses. I'm a 50 year old hypertensive. I don't expect to do well if I get infected. For now, I keep going to work. I'm one of the few pushing forward on COVID clinical trials, basic science, public health messaging, and diagnostic studies at my hospital. I feel a responsibility to keep going. I wake up with nightmares every morning at 4am. But I'm going to keep going for now. I feel very alone a lot of the time. People are not taking this seriously, and it's costing lives. -R

    "Everything we do before a pandemic will seem alarmist. Everything we do after a pandemic will seem inadequate. This is the dilemma we face, but it should not stop us from doing what we can to prepare. We need to reach out to everyone with words that inform, but not inflame. We need to encourage everyone to prepare, but not panic." — Michael O. Leavitt, 2007

    - Richard A. Loftus, MD

  14. #139

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    Dr. Lutz said before Tuesdays mandate, that he sent staff to various businesses and it was reported to him only 65% of people were wearing masks.

    Many people seem to still live in a fantasy world that Covid-19 will not hurt them, and they don't care about anyone else.

    More facts our last 3 days in the US has seen our highest number of deaths since June 9-11.

    As said before most of our WCC opponents reside in California. California is reporting 135 deaths today from Covid-19. Four states reporting over 100 deaths today from Covid-19.

    Major college football will be affected by the coronavirus pandemic.

    The Big Ten on Thursday announced its plan to play only conference games and eliminate nonconference competition in all sports. It is the first Power 5 football conference to change its fall schedule because of the pandemic.

    In a news release, the conference said details for football, men’s and women’s cross country, field hockey, men’s and women’s soccer and women’s volleyball schedules and other information "will be released at a later date, while decisions on sports not listed above will continue to be evaluated."

    "By limiting competition to other Big Ten institutions, the conference will have the greatest flexibility to adjust its own operations throughout the season and make quick decisions in real-time based on the most current evolving medical advice and the fluid nature of the pandemic," the league said.

    It is unclear how that decision might affect this season's football schedule and if all 14 conference teams will participate. Big Ten schools currently plays nine of their 12 games against league opponents.

    The Big Ten is allowing teams to continue voluntary summer activities and said schools will honor scholarships for athletes who choose not to participate during the summer or upcoming academic year because of concerns about COVID-19. Those who choose not to participate in their sport "will remain in good standing with their team."

    The decision was made after discussions among the Big Ten Council of Presidents and Chancellors, athletic directors, conference staff and medical experts, including the Big Ten Task Force for Emerging Infectious Diseases and the Big Ten Sports Medicine Committee.

    "As we continue to focus on how to play this season in a safe and responsible way, based on the best advice of medical experts, we are also prepared not to play in order to ensure the health, safety and wellness of our student-athletes should the circumstances so dictate.

    Michigan had been slated to open the season at Washington on Sept. 5, and will drop home games with Ball State and Arkansas State.

    The Wolverines are scheduled to open Big Ten play on Sept. 26 at home against Wisconsin.

    Michigan State, which has been scheduled to open the regular season Sept. 5 at Spartan Stadium against Northwestern, will be eliminating games at BYU and at home against Toledo and Miami (Fla.).The Spartans are scheduled to host Michigan on Oct. 10.

    On Thursday morning, the Atlantic Coast Conference announced it was restricting competition in all sports until Sept. 1.

    Hurricanes athletic director Blake, James in a statement, said: “While we are disappointed to lose the opportunity to face Michigan State during the 2020 season, we will work with the ACC to best position our program for the upcoming season.”

    The Ohio State athletic department has paused all voluntary workouts following the results of its most recent COVID-19 testing, it announced Wednesday evening.

    Seven teams are affected: football, men’s and women’s basketball, field hockey, men’s and women’s soccer and women’s volleyball.
    Last edited by ZAGS ATTACK BASKET; 07-09-2020 at 04:23 PM.

  15. #140
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    Cad - thank you for the view of the Coachella doc. The reality of this virus is not pretty, but needs to be widely disseminated. Too many folks just don't get it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zaglaw View Post
    Cad - thank you for the view of the Coachella doc. The reality of this virus is not pretty, but needs to be widely disseminated. Too many folks just don't get it.
    What fears me the most is that people often don't understand exponential growth. It took about 100 days for the U.S. to reach 1 million cases. It only took 43 days to reach 2 million. And now, it's about 20 some days until we hit 4 million.

    The math is scary if we continue on this trajectory.

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    Thanks Cad...

    Question... talkng of numbers... Aren’t the testing numbers paralleling the positive numbers? I just checked the states numbers and the % of positives is trending down. The number of deaths is trending down. Nationally we are ten fold down on the death numbers... I think it is important for people to see ALL the numbers and judge for themselves.

    I am for the masks... but we need to see some positive results if we are going to sell folks on wearing them.

    Stay Safe!!

    Go Zags!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by SkipZag View Post
    Thanks Cad...

    Question... talkng of numbers... Aren’t the testing numbers paralleling the positive numbers? I just checked the states numbers and the % of positives is trending down. The number of deaths is trending down. Nationally we are ten fold down on the death numbers... I think it is important for people to see ALL the numbers and judge for themselves.

    I am for the masks... but we need to see some positive results if we are going to sell folks on wearing them.

    Stay Safe!!

    Go Zags!!
    Percentage of positive tests is trending back up nationally. Which states did you notice trending down? Most are trending up.


    https://coronavirus.jhu.edu/testing/individual-states
    Agent provocateur

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    Nationally on the news... Washington from almost 8% to 5.8% and Spokane Co. at 2.3% positives to death ratio.
    As NY effected the national numbers...as King Co. effected the Washington numbers... four states are effecting the national numbers... yes we have had a tick up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SkipZag View Post
    Nationally on the news... Washington from almost 8% to 5.8% and Spokane Co. at 2.3% positives to death ratio.
    Are you talking about case fatality ratio or % of positivity in tests? I was responding to when you wrote "the % of positives is trending down." It is not, nationally or in Washington.
    Agent provocateur

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    For those contending that the lockdown did no good, from US News and World Report today:

    Shelter-in-Place Orders Prevented Up to 370,000 Coronavirus Deaths, Study Says
    Gaby Galvin 3 hrs ago

    Two months of lockdowns this spring saved as many as 370,000 lives in the U.S., according to new estimates from researchers at the University of Iowa.

    In the first week after a shelter-in-place order was enacted, the average daily growth rate in COVID-19 mortality was 20.5%, according to the analysis, which is based on data from 22 states between March 21 and May 15. In the fourth week after enactment, the growth rate fell by an average of 2.9 percentage points, while after the sixth week, the rate fell by an average of 6.1 percentage points.

    While coronavirus deaths never fully subsided, slowing the growth rate corresponded with 250,000 to 370,000 deaths potentially averted, the study found.

    The findings indicate shelter-in-place orders "played an important role in decelerating the growth curve for COVID-19 deaths and hospitalizations," said study authors George Wehby and Wei Lyu of the University of Iowa's Department of Health Management. "Had this excess burden not been averted, mortality from other conditions might have also increased due to overcrowded hospitals."
    You can read the entire article here: https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/sh...jkL?li=BBnb7Kz

    ZagDad

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    Quote Originally Posted by SkipZag View Post
    ... four states are effecting the national numbers... yes we have had a tick up.
    Interesting fact: if I recall correctly, Gonzaga's MBB team is scheduled to travel to two of those states (Texas and Arizona) on three separate occasions for a total of four pre-season games this fall.
    SLOZag
    "Kids come here to better their own lives, not ours. If you take a player’s failures as a personal affront…. check yourself." - Chick-Stratino'sUrDaddy

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    Nice charts son... thanks

    I was not looking at charts... I was looking at the numbers and the % for the state of Washington.
    While concerned with the positive tests, and knowing there are a number of different kinds... and having been told that the positive tests will go up with the number of tests (understand over 5 million taken in the US), my concerns are of the deaths and where they are going. The % is down and the trend line while not showing a great decrease from two months ago, is at least lower.

    With summer activity... we knew there would be hot spots and that the numbers would be going up... it was understood.
    And yes it would be concerning.

    That is why I am keeping an eye on the deaths (in Washington) and where it is trending. And yes positive to death ratio is on the state stats and hopefully by summer’s end and the start of the school year, things will look better.

    Thanks for the input.

    Stay Safe!!

    Go Zags!!



    Thanks

  24. #149

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    Its a new reality and wakeup call from where we (Spokane) were at when we went to phase 2. At least our Governor Inslee is putting the hammer down now. Other states like Florida, Texas, and Arizona were the slowest states to react to Covid-19 and the 1st to open up everything. California reacted quickly at the beginning but reopened everything way to fast.

    But this is not just a 4 state problem, over 30 some states have been seeing sky rocketing numbers of cases. But one thing Florida, Arizona, Texas, and California are proving is when your cases sky rocket, increased hospitalization will follow, and then increases in deaths will follow.

    At this point we (Spokane) are just trying to keep our heads above water and staying in phase 2 for the rest of July and not being pushed back to phase 1.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SkipZag View Post
    Nice charts son... thanks

    I was not looking at charts... I was looking at the numbers and the % for the state of Washington.
    While concerned with the positive tests, and knowing there are a number of different kinds... and having been told that the positive tests will go up with the number of tests (understand over 5 million taken in the US), my concerns are of the deaths and where they are going. The % is down and the trend line while not showing a great decrease from two months ago, is at least lower.

    With summer activity... we knew there would be hot spots and that the numbers would be going up... it was understood.
    And yes it would be concerning.

    That is why I am keeping an eye on the deaths (in Washington) and where it is trending. And yes positive to death ratio is on the state stats and hopefully by summer’s end and the start of the school year, things will look better.

    Thanks for the input. Stay Safe!! Go Zags!!

    Thanks
    Skip,

    You keep bringing up the Death rate, but if you read Cad's posting of the article from the San Francisco paper, and the numerous aftereffects that people who have supposedly "recovered" are still experiencing, you might have a different view.

    People who are recovered who now are on the lung replacement list. An increase in heart issues due to thickening of the blood due to Covid-19 aftereffects. And the list goes on, with people having after effects that may likely be with them for a long period of time if not the rest of their life.

    Only looking at death rates may be a little simplistic.

    ZagDad

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