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Thread: NCAA Won't Mandate Uniform Return to College Sports

  1. #151
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    Simplistic maybe... and yes I know there were health effects before and there will be afterwards. I’m not trying to Poo Poo this or simplify it!! What I’m trying for myself is find a constant... everything else has politics in the middle of it. I will say it again... if we don’t work to normalize life... there will be people including lots of children being harmed!

    We need to not be so centerminded that we loose the other things we so value!

    Go Zags!!

  2. #152

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    Another reality check today for Covid-19 in California 8,764 new cases and 102 deaths, Florida 9,670 cases and 93 deaths, Texas 9,670 new cases and 85 deaths. Two other states Arizona and Georgia had over 4,000 new cases. A additional 7 states had over 1,000 new cases Nevada, Mississippi, Alabama, South Carolina, North Carolina, Tennessee, Ohio, and Louisiana. A additional 15 states had over 500 new cases today that includes Idaho and Washington.

    One state that is not real tiny thats doing good during Covid-19 is Wyoming. Good news the Lady Zags seem to playing Wyoming quite often maybe we play them again this year. Only 16 new cases today for Wyoming. Way to go Wyoming in cowboy country.

    Other states close by that are doing much better than us are Montana (our Cowgirls state) and Oregon (Kelly Graves neck of the woods).

    So lets recap sports to watch and enjoy UFC for me this weekend.

    MLB are playing intersquad games now, heard the Mariners on radio today, perhaps TV also did not check. A player from the Mariner farm system Kyle Lewis hit 2 homers today perhaps a future rising star. Mariners start the season 24 July for 60 game season. WNBA starts 24 July, in a 22 game season in Orlando. NBA season restarts 30 July for like 8 games, then they go to playoffs.

    Side note got a laugh that they called the two squads playing each other today the Mariners verses the Pilots. Old baseball fans like me can appreciate that history.
    Last edited by ZAGS ATTACK BASKET; 07-10-2020 at 05:52 PM.

  3. #153
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZAGS ATTACK BASKET View Post
    Another reality check today for Covid-19 in California 8,764 new cases and 102 deaths, Florida 9,670 cases and 93 deaths, Texas 9,670 new cases and 85 deaths. Two other states Arizona and Georgia had over 4,000 new cases. A additional 7 states add over 1,000 new cases Nevada, Mississippi, Alabama, South Carolina, North Carolina, Tennessee, Ohio, and Louisiana. A additional 15 states had over 500 new cases today.

    One state that is not real tiny thats doing good during Covid-19 is Wyoming. Good news the Lady Zags seem to playing Wyoming quite often maybe we play them again this year.
    Big State with not very many people.

    ZagDad

  4. #154
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZagDad84 View Post
    Big State with not very many people.

    ZagDad
    Yeah, they're already essentially socially distanced in Wyoming (BTW, who ever named that state? It's just weird). Proof that distancing works to stop viral transmission.

    They (Wyomingites) do travel incredible distances though. I remember in high school how half the townspeople of Cody would come to Billings (Montana) to get their shopping done (105 miles each way, and way before Costco was a thing). Same with the native American reservations. K-Mart (old man's Walmart) on a Friday night was a sight to see, and the racism was abound. Locals would avoid Rimrock Mall and the K-Mart on Fridays just because of skin color. But the local yahoos would ride through the parking lot, screaming epithets, with shotguns mounted in the back window. Shameful. It didn't stop me from taking some of the most beautiful dates to Dos Machos on Friday nights. I didn't learn of cilantro or romance until these events. I do miss the arcade in the mall though. Star Wars, PacMan, and the pinball machines. Never had enough quarters.

  5. #155
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    Incredible article from ProPublica, which really exemplifies what's going on in the trenches.

    ‘All the Hospitals Are Full’: In Houston, Overwhelmed ICUs Leave COVID-19 Patients Waiting in ERs

    Texans, stay safe. This jarred me. A month ago, my friends were hooting, "Don't Mess With Texas!" because they were the first to reopen. I haven't heard a word from them lately.

    One important thing to realize is when the southern half of the country is overrun, it will affect the rest of us. We don't live in a bubble.

    The other thing I'd like to share is from an very notable epidemiologist whom I've had the pleasure to attend his lectures in medical school. Dr. BRILLIANT. Great guy. He was a consultant in the movie, "Contagion," which pretty much predicted all of this over a decade ago. It's a very good read. The first interview with him was one of the highest read articles in the history of WIRED magazine. This is the follow up:

    https://www.wired.com/story/larry-br...ting-covid-19/

  6. #156
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    Pathologist found blood clots in ‘almost every organ’ during autopsies on COVID-19 patients


    https://www.wfla.com/community/healt...bNKrU5sVkT0MJI

  7. #157
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    Thanks for the info caduceus and willandi. Reading these articles reminded my I hadn’t taken my warfarin today. Having had blood clots, I can assure you they do make it difficult to breathe and you don’t want them.

  8. #158

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    Correcting some bum scoop I saw about a California travel ban. This has nothing to do about Covid-19. This is California did not like some other states laws it has been effect since 2017 they just added a few states. Washington is not on their list it does not effect the WCC at all. Idaho was added to their list but the California teams that play Idaho teams in their Division will continue to play them as their is a loophole where they still can travel to Idaho using private funding.

    Tidbit listening to 107.9 FM on Sunday they have a nice sermon from Crossover Church at 11:30 PM every week. If you wait about 5 minutes it is followed by another sermon by another church. Enjoy I did the last 2 Sundays. God Bless
    Last edited by ZAGS ATTACK BASKET; 07-13-2020 at 11:44 AM.

  9. #159
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZAGS ATTACK BASKET View Post
    Correcting some bum scoop I saw about a California travel ban. This has nothing to do about Covid-19. This is California did not like some other states laws it has been effect since 2017 they just added a few states. Washington is not on their list it does not effect the WCC at all. Idaho was added to their list but the California teams that play Idaho teams in their Division will continue to play them as their is a loophole where they still can travel to Idaho using private funding.
    ZAB,

    Don't know how to respond to this.

    1. It would really help if you post your responses to the correct thread where people reading the thread can see them instead of burying them in another thread.

    2. The Mbb side of this board has just recently chased off one long time poster and an Mbb insider by posters just being Assho**s. Since we have so much Lady Zag Wbb inside information, do you really feel the need to chase off another insider (no its not me and you can't get rid of me).

    3. Do you really think that CLF would be worried about scheduling if the California State Travel Ban you are referring to,
    In AB 1887, the California Legislature determined that "California must take action to avoid supporting or financing discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people." (Gov. Code, § 11139.8, subd. (a)(5).) To that end, AB 1887
    that has been effect since 2017?

    Carry on with your Covid-19 and church updates,

    ZagDad

  10. #160
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    Worthy read: shared from another post——-Chicken pox is a virus. Lots of people have had it, and probably don't think about it much once the initial illness has passed. But it stays in your body and lives there forever, and maybe when you're older, you have debilitatingly painful outbreaks of shingles. You don't just get over this virus in a few weeks, never to have another health effect. We know this because it's been around for years, and has been studied medically for years.
    Herpes is also a virus. And once someone has it, it stays in your body and lives there forever, and anytime they get a little run down or stressed-out they're going to have an outbreak. Maybe every time you have a big event coming up (school pictures, job interview, big date) you're going to get a cold sore. For the rest of your life. You don't just get over it in a few weeks. We know this because it's been around for years, and been studied medically for years.
    HIV is a virus. It attacks the immune system, and makes the carrier far more vulnerable to other illnesses. It has a list of symptoms and negative health impacts that goes on and on. It was decades before viable treatments were developed that allowed people to live with a reasonable quality of life. Once you have it, it lives in your body forever and there is no cure. Over time, that takes a toll on the body, putting people living with HIV at greater risk for health conditions such as cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, diabetes, bone disease, liver disease, cognitive disorders, and some types of cancer. We know this because it has been around for years, and had been studied medically for years.
    Now with COVID-19, we have a novel virus that spreads rapidly and easily. The full spectrum of symptoms and health effects is only just beginning to be cataloged, much less understood.
    So far the symptoms may include:
    Fever
    Fatigue
    Coughing
    Pneumonia
    Chills/Trembling
    Acute respiratory distress
    Lung damage (potentially permanent)
    Loss of taste (a neurological symptom)
    Sore throat
    Headaches
    Difficulty breathing
    Mental confusion
    Diarrhea
    Nausea or vomiting
    Loss of appetite
    Strokes have also been reported in some people who have COVID-19 (even in the relatively young)
    Swollen eyes
    Blood clots
    Seizures
    Liver damage
    Kidney damage
    Rash
    COVID toes (weird, right?)
    People testing positive for COVID-19 have been documented to be sick even after 60 days. Many people are sick for weeks, get better, and then experience a rapid and sudden flare up and get sick all over again. A man in Seattle was hospitalized for 62 days, and while well enough to be released, still has a long road of recovery ahead of him. Not to mention a $1.1 million medical bill.
    Then there is MIS-C. Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children is a condition where different body parts can become inflamed, including the heart, lungs, kidneys, brain, skin, eyes, or gastrointestinal organs. Children with MIS-C may have a fever and various symptoms, including abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, neck pain, rash, bloodshot eyes, or feeling extra tired. While rare, it has caused deaths.
    This disease has not been around for years. It has basically been 6 months. No one knows yet the long-term health effects, or how it may present itself years down the road for people who have been exposed. We literally *do not know* what we do not know.
    For those in our society who suggest that people being cautious are cowards, for people who refuse to take even the simplest of precautions to protect themselves and those around them, I want to ask, without hyperbole and in all sincerity:
    How dare you?
    How dare you risk the lives of others so cavalierly. How dare you decide for others that they should welcome exposure as "getting it over with", when literally no one knows who will be the lucky "mild symptoms" case, and who may fall ill and die. Because while we know that some people are more susceptible to suffering a more serious case, we also know that 20 and 30 year olds have died, marathon runners and fitness nuts have died, children and infants have died.
    How dare you behave as though you know more than medical experts, when those same experts acknowledge that there is so much we don't yet know, but with what we DO know, are smart enough to be scared of how easily this is spread, and recommend baseline precautions such as:
    Frequent hand-washing
    Physical distancing
    Reduced social/public contact or interaction
    Mask wearing
    Covering your cough or sneeze
    Avoiding touching your face
    Sanitizing frequently touched surfaces
    The more things we can all do to mitigate our risk of exposure, the better off we all are, in my opinion. Not only does it flatten the curve and allow health care providers to maintain levels of service that aren't immediately and catastrophically overwhelmed; it also reduces unnecessary suffering and deaths, and buys time for the scientific community to study the virus in order to come to a more full understanding of the breadth of its impacts in both the short and long term.
    I reject the notion that it's "just a virus" and we'll all get it eventually. What a careless, lazy, heartless stance.

  11. #161
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    A very scary statistic:

    About one in five new cases of coronavirus reported around the world came from just three U.S. states -- Florida, Texas and California, a new NBC News tally revealed Tuesday.
    Article Link: https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/other...auZ?li=BBnb7Kz

    Maybe, just maybe, these States need to do something different. Just say'n, if what your doing is not working, maybe consider doing something different.

    ZagDad
    Last edited by ZagDad84; Yesterday at 12:42 PM.

  12. #162

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    The country’s most populous state took steps Monday to roll back efforts to reopen its economy amid a surge in new coronavirus cases.
    California Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) ordered the statewide closure of all bars and halted the indoor operations of restaurants, wineries, theaters and a handful of other venues. The move comes as a number of governors elsewhere are also announcing new mandates and pausing reopenings, with Oregon Gov. Kate Brown (D) banning private indoor gatherings of more than 10 people and requiring face coverings outside.
    The fresh round of restrictions echoes the early days of the pandemic, when states shuttered businesses in an attempt to slow the spread of the novel coronavirus

    BOISE, Idaho (CBS2) — The St. Luke's staff and community are grieving Monday after news that one of their long time nurse practitioners has passed away after battling COVID-19.

    Samantha Hickey, 45, worked for the St. Luke's Children's team in Canyon County for 15 years.

    "Samantha’s death is a heartbreaking consequence of the seriousness of the COVID-19 pandemic," a spokesperson for the hospital said.


    Her death was announced July 13. There were no underlying conditions the hospital, nor her husband, was aware of.


    "As a life-long learner and community-minded caregiver, Samantha’s husband and four children say she wanted to make a difference," the spokesperson said. "They believe she would want her death not to be in vain, but to serve as a stark reminder that people must do whatever they can to protect themselves and others and take this pandemic seriously."

    St. Luke's said she provided dedicated and compassionate care to the children in the community.

    "She spent her clinical days caring for patients, training the next generation of nurse practitioners, and advocating for the wellbeing of her community," the spokesperson said. "Our organization is hurting along with her family and loved ones."

    The spokesperson added that another one of Samantha’s colleagues said her patients loved her, and many followed her as a nurse practitioner to her clinic in Caldwell. She had moved to Anguilla for a time and then returned.
    Last edited by ZAGS ATTACK BASKET; Yesterday at 11:16 AM.

  13. #163
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    Coronavirus updates: Moderna says everyone in vaccine trial developed antibodies

    https://abcnews.go.com/US/coronaviru...ry?id=71768743

  14. #164

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    Have from heard various news reports that coronavirus antibodies do not last long long for 3 weeks after cleared of Coronavirus, then antibodies quickly reduce. Been reports of those that had Coronavirus in March have been getting it again. Tonight on world news it interviewed a guy that had Covid-19 in March and now he's got it again, said he recognized the signs from the first go around he was not happy about it. Tom Hanks and his wife who also got Covid-19 said based on their checkups that he and his wife are really being safe, because his doctor had told him his antibodies are so reduced they would very likely not protect them from getting it again. Both Hanks and his wife have health issues.

    It pays to have a Governor that take takes Covid-19 seriously (Cudos Inslee). Some states have no leadership at Governor level, Florida seems to be one state with no one leading them at the top. Governor of California finally decided to pull back the reins, hope he keeps them tight till they regain control. Good to see our neighboring state Oregon being active also. Idaho worries me even though they are a smaller sparse state, they are right next to us and they are pretty much wide open, and the Kootenai County (includes Coeurd'Alene) seems to be the worst county in Idaho with Covid-19 with not enough restrictions.
    Last edited by ZAGS ATTACK BASKET; Today at 11:00 AM.

  15. #165
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZAGS ATTACK BASKET View Post
    Have from heard various news reports that coronavirus antibodies do not last long long for 3 weeks after cleared of Coronavirus, then antibodies quickly reduce. Been reports of those that had Coronavirus in March have been getting it again. So could likely face same scenario for a vaccine, great you get antibodies, but then they start disappearing 3 weeks later.
    My understanding, and hopefully Cad or someone will correct me, is that antibodies for any disease naturally fade after an infection. What is left are 'memory' cells that recognize a recurrence and signal the immune system to produce those specific antibodies to fight the infection. I have not read anywhere that we can test for those memory cells or if they have a lifetime. It seems that they do or we wouldn't need booster shots for some vaccines.

  16. #166

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    Thanks Pallet makes sense.

    The body keeps a few T-lymphocytes, called memory cells, that go into action quickly if the body encounters the same germ again. When the familiar antigens are detected, B-lymphocytes produce antibodies to attack them. Vaccines prevent diseases that can be dangerous, or even deadly.

    Understanding How Vaccines Work - CDC
    Last edited by ZAGS ATTACK BASKET; Yesterday at 08:35 PM.

  17. #167
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pallet View Post
    My understanding, and hopefully Cad or someone will correct me, is that antibodies for any disease naturally fade after an infection. What is left are 'memory' cells that recognize a recurrence and signal the immune system to produce those specific antibodies to fight the infection. I have not read anywhere that we can test for those memory cells or if they have a lifetime. It seems that they do or we wouldn't need booster shots for some vaccines.
    It's complicated, to say the least. In general, antibodies do fade over time in response to an infectious illness or a vaccine. But there is a very wide variability. That's why some conditions (like Tetanus) need booster shots every so often. Some confer (for most, but not all people) lifelong protection.

    Additionally, the body has more than one weapon to fight off disease. "Humoral immunity" is that brought on by B-cells that produce circulating antibodies. Those antibodies attach to a unique protein on the bug and act like a flag to tell immune cells, "Here's one! Attack!"

    "Cellular immunity" comes from other warriors, including a wide range of white blood cells, like T-cells. And the immune system can store a memory of past infections (like a library) for both antibodies and for the immune cells in case someone is exposed to the same illness again. For some viruses, the immune system keeps a strong memory (like Measles). For others, it fades but often will keep some immunity/memory (like Hepatitis B). For others (some coronaviruses included), the immune system seems to "forget" after a while (like a lost library book). And lastly, some viruses mutate so quickly that the immune system's defenses don't recognize the bug as a past invader (like Influenza).

    I said it was complicated. This is the simplified version.

    Often (excepting the ones that mutate frequently -- coronavirus does not so much), vaccines are perfected over time to produce a much stronger immunity than one would get with an infection. That means a stronger defense in the "library" for the future. It remains to be seen how efficient the early vaccines will be. The Oxford one has a big jump on the other candidates, because they already had most of the work done on MERS (another coronavirus). Hopefully that means a safe and efficacious vaccine sooner rather than later.

    Edit: To the other part of your question, yes, it's possible test for cellular immunity (memory) in the lab, but it's much, much more difficult than testing for antibody titers (amounts circulating in the blood). Some specialized labs are doing this right now. It won't be done for masses of the population, but rather for research purposes.

  18. #168
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkipZag View Post
    Simplistic maybe... and yes I know there were health effects before and there will be afterwards. I’m not trying to Poo Poo this or simplify it!! What I’m trying for myself is find a constant... everything else has politics in the middle of it. I will say it again... if we don’t work to normalize life... there will be people including lots of children being harmed!

    We need to not be so centerminded that we loose the other things we so value!

    Go Zags!!

    ^100% ^

  19. #169

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    SPOKANE, Wash. - Spokane County Health Officer Dr. Bob Lutz wants the community to focus on trends rather than numbers as COVID-19 cases see a continual increase, and says citizen's behavior needs to improve when it comes to health guidelines impacting those trends.

    Lutz got out of the norm of reporting the latest COVID-19 case, death and hospitalization counts at the start his Wednesday media briefing, saying he wants to discourage the public from focusing on the numbers. In fact, he no longer plans to disclose those numbers during his future briefings. (They are reported daily at this link if you still want to know the numbers: https://srhd.org/covid19)

    "I'm looking at trends and I would encourage us to look at the trends in COVID-19," Lutz said. "There is ups and downs, there is peaks. We're going to have days where we have a lot of cases and days where we have fewer cases, but I'm looking at trends over a week, over two weeks and that's what I would encourage you to look at."

    A noticeable trend has obviously been the increase in cases over the past few weeks in Spokane County.

    "My hope is that with the [state face covering proclamation] that we will start to see a trend in leveling off of cases and eventually a decrease," Lutz said.

    Considering that proclamation, Lutz mentioned some recent studies by individuals and volunteers that observed the use of masks or face coverings in the community. The most recent study found about 58% of people use masks in this week, compared to about 65% the week prior. Lutz also made note that the individuals most frequently not wearing face coverings were white males.

    Lutz said a lot of the recent case trends is a function of behavior, such as those not following guidance like physical distancing or face coverings and forming large gatherings. He shared his disappointment hearing during a call with state health officials Tuesday that the case rate in Washington is higher than the presumed peak back in the spring.

    "We have a lot of work to do collectively if we're going to see a trend in actual flattening of the curve both locally and at the state level," Lutz said.

    As concerns of community spread arise, Lutz said an estimated 15-40% of those infected could be asymptomatic or pre-symptomatic, reiterating the importance of those conducting contact tracing or case investigations.

    Lutz has too heard rumblings about the county possibly moving back to phase 1, but said none of those rumblings have been credible and that the ramifications of a move back would be too significant at many levels other than public health.

  20. #170
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    How about a little bit of History tonight from the History Channel:

    5 Advances That Followed Pandemics
    Diseases have devastated human populations, but they've also inspired social upheaval and innovations.
    GLENN MCDONALD
    JUL 15, 2020

    Pandemics have ravaged human civilizations through history. But global health crises have also sparked progress in culture and society, changing lives for the better. Water and sanitation systems improved and revelations led to innovations in limiting disease spread, as well as in treatments and vaccines.

    “Public policy and society as a whole have been dramatically shaped by epidemics,” says Katherine Foss, author of Constructing the Outbreak: Epidemics in Media & Collective Memory.

    Below are five positive changes that followed epidemics, pandemics and large-scale public health crises of the past.

    - The Black Death Leads to Better Conditions for the Poor
    - The 1918 Pandemic Improves Patient Care
    - Changes in Protective Gear, Housing
    - Pandemics Inspire Great Works of Art
    - Epidemic Inspires Founding Fathers to Consider Public Health
    Click the link below to read about the details of the positive changes brought fourth by a Pandemic along with videos and pictures.

    History Link: https://www.history.com/news/pandemi...50f4d70a2cdce4

    ZagDad

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