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Thread: NCAA Won't Mandate Uniform Return to College Sports

  1. #251
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    Washington DOH reports 11 cases of COVID-related inflammatory disease in children

    https://www.kxly.com/washington-doh-...e-in-children/
    It's not funny.

  3. #253
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    Had a chance to review this thread this morning and for me it’s GAME OVER...

    This thread has become dark, negative and accusing... and I got sucked in...

    I joined this board a number of years ago to have some fun discussing GU women’s BB and to do a little arm chair coaching.

    I like to be a positive, half full, problem solver, consensus builder.

    Sorry ZD you will have to depend on others to run the numbers up... I’m out of here.

    Stay safe folks and I’ll catch you on one of the positive GU WBB threads.

    Go Zags!!

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    That's one way to social distance.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tummydoc View Post
    That's one way to social distance.


    ZagDad

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    Default This is astonishing

    97,000 children reportedly test positive for coronavirus in two weeks as schools gear up for instruction


    Nearly 100,000 children tested positive for the coronavirus in the last two weeks of July, a new report from the American Academy of Pediatrics finds. Just over 97,000 children tested positive for the coronavirus from July 16 to July 30, according to the association.

    Out of almost 5 million reported COVID-19 cases in the U.S., CBS News' Michael George reports that the group found that more than 338,000 were children.

    I'm gobsmacked. These numbers go beyond any adjectives I have left in my dictionary.

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/covid-1...n-instruction/

  7. #257

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    As school districts are announcing learning plans for the 2020 - 2021 school year, Spokane Regional Health Officer Dr. Bob Lutz said he is disappointed that some schools are planning to hold in-person classes.

    "The decision made by local school districts and their school boards to begin school in the fall with in-person learning - a choice contrary to the public health recommendations of Spokane Regional Health District, Washington State Department of Health, the governor and OSPI - is disappointing," Lutz said in a statement to KHQ.

    So far, two districts in the greater Spokane area are planning to hold in-person classes.

    East Valley School District is planning a hybrid in-person and online model. Mead School District is planning to have daily in-person learning for grades K-5 and a rotating in-person schedule for grades 6-12.

    On Monday, Lutz recommended schools begin the year remotely.

    "I acknowledge the challenges these recommendations provide," Lutz wrote in a statement. "I also acknowledge the challenges that will occur for students when cases occur in school, which will have ripple effects not only within their school due to class quarantines and closures, but throughout the community as parents and their workplaces are exposed."

  8. #258
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    Quote Originally Posted by caduceus View Post
    97,000 children reportedly test positive for coronavirus in two weeks as schools gear up for instruction


    Nearly 100,000 children tested positive for the coronavirus in the last two weeks of July, a new report from the American Academy of Pediatrics finds. Just over 97,000 children tested positive for the coronavirus from July 16 to July 30, according to the association.

    Out of almost 5 million reported COVID-19 cases in the U.S., CBS News' Michael George reports that the group found that more than 338,000 were children.

    I'm gobsmacked. These numbers go beyond any adjectives I have left in my dictionary.

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/covid-1...n-instruction/
    So?

    CDC says IFR (Infection Mortality Rate) for kids aged 5-19 is less than .00032%. Apply that to 338,000 cases and you get ONE death. More kids will die from playground accidents than from Covid infections.

    If your goal is to eliminate every potential death caused by the virus, by all means, shut down the schools, business, etc. and declare martial law to keep us all isolated.

    All the lockdown efforts have done is slow the infection rate in order to not overwhelm the hospitals. It has done nothing to reduce the number of infections in the long term. The virus doesn't care WHEN a host is available. As long as there are people to infect it will continue it's path.

  9. #259

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    89 deaths in Spokane County now of Covid-19.

  10. #260

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    Kelly Graves Retweeted

    CAMPBELL
    @GoDucksMC
    �� �� �� �� �� �� • �� �� �� �� �� ��

    It’s impressive & unique what she can do at 6’7! She has been putting in �������� this summer.

    @sedonaprince_
    is going to be a serious ��������������!

    #���������������������� //
    @OregonWBB

    1:18
    14.7K views
    10:31 AM · Aug 8, 2020·Twitter for iPhone

    So folks go to Kelly Graves Twitter and you will see all his players are practicing on the court wearing mask.

    Coach Graves had said in a earlier article that when he made it mandatory for all players to wear masks on the court everyone complained the first week but now they are use to it.

    The Lady Zags should be doing the same thing keep your players safe CLF, catch up to your mentor. That what makes Coach Graves a great coach always one step of everyone else. Coach Graves also said in a earlier article that players need to stay safe 24/7 and he is impressing those standards on his players. He also encouraged their fans to wear masks and stay safe. When you in a pandemic great leaders step it up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Markburn1 View Post
    So?

    CDC says IFR (Infection Mortality Rate) for kids aged 5-19 is less than .00032%. Apply that to 338,000 cases and you get ONE death. More kids will die from playground accidents than from Covid infections.

    If your goal is to eliminate every potential death caused by the virus, by all means, shut down the schools, business, etc. and declare martial law to keep us all isolated.

    All the lockdown efforts have done is slow the infection rate in order to not overwhelm the hospitals. It has done nothing to reduce the number of infections in the long term. The virus doesn't care WHEN a host is available. As long as there are people to infect it will continue it's path.
    Applying national infection rates to local school district decisions on whether to hold online classes or in school classes is unrealistic. As syndicated columnist Kathleen Parker said in her column today, when you have a positive infection rate in Vermont of 0.6% or an infection rate in Mississippi of 20.9%, the decision may (and probably should) be entirely different.

    It is nice to have an Infection Mortality Rate of less than 0.00032%, but we all know classrooms are a petri dish of various infections. While the mortality rate is low, it does not account for the long lasting or permanent health issues kids may obtain my catching Covid-19. It also does not account for the teachers, non-certified educators, cooks, janitors, administrators, bus drivers who will be impacted by the kids catching Covid-19 not to mention the after school caregivers, grandparents, or even the parents. It begins with the school kids but goes far beyond that in the real world.

    The School Districts have a difficult decision to make and it is not as easy as simply looking at Infection Mortality Rate for the kids. Hopefully the School Districts who elect to start the year with in school education choose to follow the mask, social distancing and minimal size on group gatherings to minimize the rate of infections. We have seen what happens when schools do not follow the health department guidelines (See the State of Georgia) and it is not pretty or desirable.

    ZagDad
    Last edited by ZagDad84; 08-09-2020 at 04:10 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Markburn1 View Post
    All the lockdown efforts have done is slow the infection rate in order to not overwhelm the hospitals. It has done nothing to reduce the number of infections in the long term. The virus doesn't care WHEN a host is available. As long as there are people to infect it will continue it's path.
    This is wrong. I've iterated several times why proactive non-pharmaceutical interventions ("flattening the curve") are about MUCH MORE than maintaining hospital bed availability. I can go over that again with the near dozen reasons why, but it's easy to look back on the board. If you still question whether lockdowns don't work, look at New Zealand, which locked down hard, contact traced & quarantined, and now has been virus free for over three months (and back to completely normal life there).

    I"m repeating myself again, but studies have shown the lockdowns saved tens of thousands of lives. It is absolutely wrong that they did nothing to reduce infection transmission in the long term. The problem is that people suddenly decided it was over in late May and dangerously thought they knew more than the experts, dropped their guard, and cases exploded in those places.

    While most of the recent infections have been in younger people (esp 20-29), most of the deaths in that subsequent wave have continued to be older people, suggesting that contacts of younger infecteds are spreading it to more vulnerable populations.

    There have been many hundreds of hospitalizations of children, and of those hospitalizations 1/3 have required ICU care (same ratio as adults). All the while the population of kids have been one of the most shielded groups since March.

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    Quote Originally Posted by caduceus View Post
    This is wrong. I've iterated several times why proactive non-pharmaceutical interventions ("flattening the curve") are about MUCH MORE than maintaining hospital bed availability. I can go over that again with the near dozen reasons why, but it's easy to look back on the board. If you still question whether lockdowns don't work, look at New Zealand, which locked down hard, contact traced & quarantined, and now has been virus free for over three months (and back to completely normal life there).

    I"m repeating myself again, but studies have shown the lockdowns saved tens of thousands of lives. It is absolutely wrong that they did nothing to reduce infection transmission in the long term. The problem is that people suddenly decided it was over in late May and dangerously thought they knew more than the experts, dropped their guard, and cases exploded in those places.

    While most of the recent infections have been in younger people (esp 20-29), most of the deaths in that subsequent wave have continued to be older people, suggesting that contacts of younger infecteds are spreading it to more vulnerable populations.

    There have been many hundreds of hospitalizations of children, and of those hospitalizations 1/3 have required ICU care (same ratio as adults). All the while the population of kids have been one of the most shielded groups since March.
    It is not wrong.

    And using New Zealand as a barometer is disingenuous. NZ is an island with five million people. They closed their borders to all foreign nationals and quarantine anyone entering the country for fourteen days.

    Pick an area the size of New Zealand in the US with comparable population and impose martial law with no travel in or out and that area would have zero transmissions as well. That scenario is virtually impossible In these United States and you know it.

    How long will the people on that island put up with those kind of restrictions? Nearly 100% of their people are still potential hosts for the virus. When the rest of the world has reached some level of immunity NZ will have to stay locked down and suffer the economic consequences. One of the largest sectors of their economy is tourism. Who will want to travel there and be forced to quarantine for fourteen days before they can snorkel?

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    From Bloomberg:

    Covid-19 Cases Among U.S. Children Jumped 40% in Late July
    Jeff Sutherland

    Coronavirus infections among U.S. children grew 40% in the last half of July, according to a report from the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Children’s Hospital Association, bringing the total number of child infections to 8.8% of all U.S. cases.

    The report, which aggregates data from 49 states, comes amid heated debate over whether schools should re-open in the fall. While the surge of infections contradicts President Donald Trump’s assertion that kids are “virtually immune,” the data also show that child infections make up a disproportionately small share of the overall outbreak in the U.S.

    Many parents are eager to get their kids back in classes. Yet Covid-19 is still surging in much of the country, and there is conflicting data about how Covid-19 is transmitted to and from children. Some schools that have already resumed classes have experienced outbreaks amid scenes of kids crowded together without wearing masks, raising fears that a full nationwide re-opening in September will cause a new spike of infection.

    The study said 97,078 new child cases were reported from July 16-30, bringing the total number since the pandemic began to 338,982. The range of ages varied from state to state, with some including an age limit as high as 24.

    California, Florida and Arizona had the highest number of total child cases in the U.S., with more than 20,000 each, the report found. By population, Arizona had the highest count, with more than 1,000 cases per 100,000 children, more than double the national average of 447.

    Deaths among U.S. children from Covid-19 total 86, only 0.06% of total fatalities in the country and 0.03% of infections among children.
    Article Link: https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/co...D7O?li=BBnba9O

    Additional Article:

    In Reopening U.S. Schools, Science Is Offering Few Clear Answers: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/artic...-clear-answers

    Data from articles above shows why School Districts have such a difficult decision on whether to open schools or go with online learning.

    ZagDad

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    Mark... get out before you get sucked into their dark negative world you have already been accused of killing people with your views. They know way to much for you to change their minds... so don’t waste your time.

    If you have a minute. scroll up this thread to the post where children being sent back to school is compared to sending them into shark infested waters. Gives you an idea who you are dealing with.

    Stay safe...

    Go Zags!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Markburn1 View Post
    It is not wrong.
    That's a great rebuttal. Please provide a source. Medical journal preferred, although great-sourced mainstream media will suffice. There isn't an epidemiologist or public health official or nary a medical doctor that will agree with you.

    And using New Zealand as a barometer is disingenuous. NZ is an island with five million people. They closed their borders to all foreign nationals and quarantine anyone entering the country for fourteen days.
    NZ did MUCH, MUCH more than that. NZ locked down three weeks after the virus arrival. No one else acted that swiftly and rigorously to stop an entire nation from moving around and clustering together. From a Kiwi: "Basically everyone stopped work except truly essential workers (food supply chain, medical, telecoms etc) no schools, no construction, no take out food, no online shopping for anything other than food, no nothing. You could go to either the supermarket, chemist, or head out to your local park for a walk. No taking your bike off for a 4 hour ride, no taking your kayak to the ocean, no having friends over, no going for a drive etc etc. Businesses hurt, relationships either made stronger or broke, much Netflix was watched. Neighborhoods were eeerrily quiet. Motorways were almost deserted. But 5 million people banded together, took that period of pain, for long term gain. In hindsight it was the best thing we've ever collectively done." Much of the U.S. did none of these things.

    If you don't find NZ comparable for your argument, let's look at the score with countries with populations over 10 million. Currently, the U.S. has had 1 death for every 2000 people due to this disease. That's 500 deaths per million. Worldwide, there are 7 countries with higher per capita death rates, and most of those were hit early and didn't know how to manage it (or decided not to, Bork, Bork, Bork). Of the remaining high population countries, 79 have had better per capita death rates than the United States. Not only are they better, but 74 of those 79 countries have death rates less than half of the U.S. (<250 deaths/million).

    Pick an area the size of New Zealand in the US with comparable population and impose martial law with no travel in or out and that area would have zero transmissions as well. That scenario is virtually impossible In these United States and you know it.
    Hawaii is a reasonable comparison, and they've not done nearly as well, despite relatively aggressive measures by U.S. standards (and are looking worse by day). Not sure what your obsession is with martial law, but that hasn't happened virtually any place. Other than China, there's been no martial law anywhere (NK maybe?). Travel brings transmission, but it's very minor compared to community spread. I can pick plenty of places in the world without harsh restrictions that have done just fine compared to here. Remember, the U.S. has had 500 deaths per million. Canada has had 238. South Africa has had 175. Germany? 110. Japan (oldest population worldwide)? 8. South Korea (which had their first case the day we did in Washington), 6 per million. Oh, and none of these countries' citizens have to pay a penny for their care (compared to $10,000 a day for ICU care in the U.S.).

    How long will the people on that island put up with those kind of restrictions? Nearly 100% of their people are still potential hosts for the virus. When the rest of the world has reached some level of immunity NZ will have to stay locked down and suffer the economic consequences. One of the largest sectors of their economy is tourism. Who will want to travel there and be forced to quarantine for fourteen days before they can snorkel?
    We will not see any substantial degree of immunity here without a vaccine. Eighty-eight percent of the U.S. population hasn't been exposed, and 133,000 additional deaths are anticipated in less than four months. In NZ, life is basically back to normal, without masks, or distancing or all the stress and fear that goes along with it. And how many tourists are coming here? About 99% of the world's countries won't let US visit THEM. Meanwhile, we are arguing whether sports or school will happen at all, and arguing why or why not we should wear a mask, all the while praying for a vaccine that probably won't be population effectual for another 6 to 12 months.

    These arguments are tiring. If you have something medically/scientifically valid, or have some expertise to show, please provide it. Nearly everything you posted is speculative. I'm tired of the geopolitical nonsense.

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    Every one of these poor kids looks like they are in fear.

    "We can't enforce masks because they are completely voluntary"....but....

    Banned by Georgia officials:



    Even the first rule is subjective. Define "inappropriate" or "revealing". Does revealing apply to a male? Does that take a committee to decide? Jeez.

    I wanna get off this train of insanity and stupidity.

    The school is now shut down for two weekdays, and will decide if teaching is online by late Tuesday, after 9 kids are positive for coronavirus. "Deep cleaning" (meaning wiping a few surfaces) is in progress. The school will be reinfected five minutes after pupils re-enter the school. Surfaces are not the main transmission means....BREATHING NEAR ANYONE IS.

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    We've stressed that wearing masks protects other people, but it also protects the wearer. A mask lowers the viral inoculum (viral dose), and that appears to be associated with less severe infection or even asymptomatic infection. This is from the University of California San Francisco Dr Monica Ghandi (Infectious ds):

    "Early in the year, as COVID-19 spread around the world, infectious disease experts began to notice this strange aspect of the new virus – the extreme variation in its symptoms and severity. Some who tested positive didn’t seem sick at all, some had symptoms of a cold, others lost their sense of taste or developed delirium, and still others suffered severe pneumonia that led to death.

    Experts quickly focused on differences among patients, such as age and co-morbidities, that can affect their chances of severe illness. But the details of two outbreaks on cruise ships spurred Gandhi to think that viral dose could be another important determinant of the course of the new illness.

    In February, one of the first outbreaks of COVID-19 outside of China occurred on the Diamond Princess cruise ship docked in Yokohama, Japan. Of the 634 people on board who tested positive, about 18 percent of infections were asymptomatic. In March, an Argentinian cruise ship found itself in a similar predicament, but of the 128 people on board who eventually tested positive, 81 percent were asymptomatic.

    A key difference, Gandhi noted, was that on the Argentinian ship, surgical masks were issued to all passengers and N95 masks to all staff as soon as the first passenger became sick.

    More recently, an Oregon seafood processing plant where workers were required to wear face masks reported an outbreak of 124 cases, 95 percent of which were asymptomatic. Similarly, in a Tyson chicken processing plant outbreak in Arkansas where workers were provided mandatory masks, 455 out of 481, or nearly 95 percent were asymptomatic.

    To Gandhi, these case studies suggest that if more people wore masks, we could see less serious illness from COVID-19 and a higher proportion of asymptomatic cases, currently estimated to be around 40 percent of cases by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Milder infections would ease the burden on the health care system, save lives, and even nudge us closer to herd immunity before a vaccine becomes available, said Gandhi.

    And it means that the public health message on masks can appeal to more than altruism.

    “We messaged that mask-wearing will protect other people, and that did not seem to convince our country as much as we would have hoped,” said Gandhi. That’s not surprising given human nature, she said. “If you think something’s going to help you or your family, you are going to do it more than if you think you’re helping others.”

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    Thank you Tummy for some very good information on masking... put to us in a very caring way.

    Stay Safe, Mask up and “Social Distance”

    Go Zags!!

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    Thanks for some very relative information Tummydoc.

    ZagDad

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    For those holding out for the vaccine to be the end of Covid-19, may wish to re-evaluate their expectations.

    Fauci tells Americans to be mindful of these important limitations about any future coronavirus vaccine
    Quentin Fottrell

    Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases for the last three decades and an expert on pandemics for the last four decades, has been optimistic on a vaccine arriving at the end of 2020 or in early 2021, but he has also cautioned the public on their expectations for the effectiveness of any vaccine that is developed.

    “The chances of it being 98% are not great, which means you must never abandon the public-health approach,” Fauci told a recent live streamed Q&A hosted by Brown University. “You’ve got to think of a vaccine as a tool to be able to get a pandemic to no longer be a pandemic, but to be something that’s well-controlled.”

    “What I’m shooting for is that, with a vaccine and good public-health measures, we can bring it down to somewhere between really good control and elimination,” he told Abdullah Shihipar, a public-health research associate at Brown in the interview. “So that’s what a vaccine is going to do, but it’s not going to do that alone.”

    ‘The chances of it being 98% are not great. Which means you must never abandon the public-health approach.’ — Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

    Fauci has said he was hopeful that a coronavirus vaccine could be developed by early 2021, but has previously said it’s unlikely that a vaccine will deliver 100% immunity; he said the best realistic outcome, based on other vaccines, would be 70% to 75% effective. The measles vaccine, he said, is among the most effective by providing 97% immunity.

    Reviews of past studies have found that, on average, the flu vaccine is about 50% to 60% effective for healthy adults who are between 18 and 64 years old, according to a review of studies by the Mayo Clinic. “The vaccine may sometimes be less effective,” it said. “Even when the vaccine doesn’t completely prevent the flu, it may lessen the severity of your illness.”

    Fauci advocates face masks, social distancing and avoiding bars and indoor spaces with crowds. “If we do those things — and I’m going to repeat it until I’m exhausted — those things work,” he said on Friday’s live stream. “When you have something that needs everybody pulling at the same time, if you have one weak link in there that doesn’t do it, it doesn’t allow you to get to the end game.”
    Read entire article here: https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/med...xEz?li=BBnb7Kz

    ZagDad

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    Skip said, "get out before you get sucked into their dark negative world." Well, get ready for reality. I encourage you to read this article. It's full of information by actual public health officials (EXPERTS). Deny their views at your own peril. We have just a month or two to prepare for what this article informs.

    Statnews is a reputable news source for healthcare professionals. Meanwhile, their articles are generally readable for the general public. This one should be read by all. I said winter is coming. They said it too:






    “I think November, December, January, February are going to be tough months in this country without a vaccine,” said Michael Osterholm, director of the Center for Infectious Diseases Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota.

    It is possible, of course, that some vaccines could be approved by then, thanks to historically rapid scientific work. But there is little prospect that vast numbers of Americans will be vaccinated in time to forestall the grim winter Osterholm and others foresee.
    To put that in perspective, at this rate the U.S. is racking up more cases in a week than Britain has accumulated since the start of the pandemic.
    The country has fallen into a dangerous pattern, Osterholm said, where a spike in cases in a location leads to some temporary restraint from people who eventually become alarmed enough to start to take precautions. But as soon as cases start to plateau or decline a little, victory over the virus is declared and people think it’s safe to resume normal life.

    “It’s like an all or nothing phenomenon, right?” said Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases. “You all locked down or you get so discouraged with being in lockdown that you decide you’re going to be in crowded bars … you can have indoor parties with no masks. You can do all the things that are going to get you in trouble.”
    Ehresmann and others in public health are flummoxed by the phenomenon of people refusing to acknowledge the risk the virus poses.

    “Just this idea of, ‘I just don’t want to believe it so therefore it’s not going to be true’ — honestly, I have not really dealt with that as it relates to disease before,” she said.
    Young people in particular need to understand that even if they are less likely to die from Covid-19, statistically speaking, transmission among 20-somethings will eventually lead to infections among their parents and grandparents, where the risk of severe infections and fatal outcomes is higher. (Young people can also develop long-term health problems as a result of the virus.)
    Last edited by caduceus; 08-11-2020 at 04:34 AM.

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    A Lesson on How Not to Re-open Schools.

    Georgia School District Quarantines Over 900 Students and Teachers
    New York Times
    Richard Fausset

    CANTON, Ga. — The first letter went out on Aug. 4, one day after students in the Cherokee County School District returned to their classrooms for the first time since the eruption of the coronavirus pandemic.

    “Dear Parents,” wrote Dr. Ashley Kennerly, the principal of Sixes Elementary School. “I am writing this letter in order to communicate that a student in 2nd grade has tested positive for Covid-19.”

    By the time the last bell rang on Friday afternoon, principals at 10 other schools had sent similar letters to families in Cherokee County, a bucolic and politically conservative stretch of suburbs north of Atlanta. This week, more letters went out.

    Altogether, more than 900 students and staff members in the district have already been ordered to quarantine. On Tuesday, one high school closed its doors until at least Aug. 31.

    While many of the nation’s largest school systems have opted in recent weeks to start the academic year online, other districts have forged ahead with reopening. In Georgia, Tennessee, Mississippi, Indiana and elsewhere, some schools, mainly in suburban and rural areas, have been open for almost two weeks.

    Their experience reveals the perils of returning to classrooms in places where the coronavirus has hardly been tamed. Students and teachers have immediately tested positive, sending others into two-week quarantines and creating whiplash for schools that were eager to open, only to consider closing again right away.
    Read the rest of the article here including why some parents and administrators consider the opening a success and others not so much: https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/ge...wKt?li=BBnb7Kz

    The picture posted by Cad earlier in this thread of the crowded High School Hallway was from a school in the Cherokee County School District.

    ZagDad

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    Quote Originally Posted by caduceus View Post
    This is wrong. I've iterated several times why proactive non-pharmaceutical interventions ("flattening the curve") are about MUCH MORE than maintaining hospital bed availability. I can go over that again with the near dozen reasons why, but it's easy to look back on the board. If you still question whether lockdowns don't work, look at New Zealand, which locked down hard, contact traced & quarantined, and now has been virus free for over three months (and back to completely normal life there).

    I"m repeating myself again, but studies have shown the lockdowns saved tens of thousands of lives. It is absolutely wrong that they did nothing to reduce infection transmission in the long term. The problem is that people suddenly decided it was over in late May and dangerously thought they knew more than the experts, dropped their guard, and cases exploded in those places.

    While most of the recent infections have been in younger people (esp 20-29), most of the deaths in that subsequent wave have continued to be older people, suggesting that contacts of younger infecteds are spreading it to more vulnerable populations.

    There have been many hundreds of hospitalizations of children, and of those hospitalizations 1/3 have required ICU care (same ratio as adults). All the while the population of kids have been one of the most shielded groups since March.
    https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/pol...election-delay

    https://www.npr.org/sections/coronav...unknown-source

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