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Thread: NCAA's Mark Emmert says fall sports likely a no-go if campuses are not open

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    Default NCAA's Mark Emmert says fall sports likely a no-go if campuses are not open

    I saw this article on ESPN. I know NCAA Men's Basketball is a winter sport but does this portend to anything negative for basketball seasonl?



    NCAA president Mark Emmert said he does not envision schools being ready to begin competing in college football or other fall sports unless students return to campuses around the country. In an interview shown on the NCAA's official Twitter account Friday night, Emmert said he has spoken to hundreds of presidents and commissioners in recent weeks and he believes there is consensus among them.

    "All of the commissioners and every president that I've talked to is in clear agreement: If you don't have students on campus, you don't have student-athletes on campus," Emmert said. "That doesn't mean [the school] has to be up and running in the full normal model, but you have to treat the health and well-being of the athletes at least as much as the regular students. ... If a school doesn't reopen, then they're not going to be playing sports. It's really that simple."

    Emmert said he believes final decisions about fall sports could come sometime next month. "I somewhat suspect that people are going to have to make decisions sometime in June," Emmert said. "Maybe by the Fourth of July."

    While major conference commissioners have pushed for schools and the athletic programs attached to them to start at the same time, Emmert said that's unlikely. He said schools, based on institutional and local regulations, will likely open at different times with different models, potentially with students on campus or off campus, for each university.

    "It's unlikely everyone is in the same situation," he said. Emmert said multiple conference commissioners, school presidents and athletic directors have had conversations about the various scenarios that could unfold in the coming months. As a result, he said, there have been conversations about "relaxing" typical regulations such as the number of games or the rules governing how often opponents can play one another in the same season. "Let's keep our priorities in place and recognize this is going to be a very unusual school year and we just have to make the best of it," he said.

    Dr. Brian Hainline, the NCAA's chief medical officer who also participated in the conversation on Friday night, added that improved testing and tracing are key components going forward.

    "What does testing really mean and how often does it have to be done, especially if you're in a contact sport and the athletes are close to each other?" he said.

    But there is hope. Emmert said he thinks a "phased" approach could potentially lead to the gradual return of fans, assuming those decisions align with local, state and federal regulations.

    "Just because there's some regulation that's been lifted doesn't mean that automatically means you should immediately put 105,000 fans in a football stadium," Emmert said. "I think that the proper thing to do and the sensible thing to do is a phased approach. It's plausible to me that early in the season, let's just stick with football, you see a very limited fan access but by later in the season, as things develop, hopefully in a very positive way, you all of sudden can see larger fan bases attending."

    But Emmert also said that's an optimistic perspective. There are scenarios that worry him and other college sports powerbrokers, scenarios they're not sure how they'll address if there is an outbreak during the season.

    "The other scenario that we all are nervous about but we certainly have to think through, is 'What if we have an outbreak?'' he said. "What if there is a flare up in a community on a campus? What do we do then? How does the campus handle it? How does the fan base handle it? What do you do with your student-athlete? We've got just a little bit of time to think through all of those scenarios. Because that too is certainly plausible with 11,000 NCAA schools, 19,000 teams, half-million student-athletes. The arithmetic is not in your favor if you think you're not going to have any outbreaks in that cohort. We're working through all of these scenarios."

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    in 1968-69, Hong Kong flu killed 1 million people worldwide and in the US, 100,00 people and yet we had time to go to the moon and have woodstock....

    viruses will always be with us.....

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    What Emmert says is true, but he, just like virtually every one of us, is simply speculating about what will happen in the next 2-3 months.
    Nobody knows because the facts are not yet in. If the outbreak continues, especially if there is a second wave of the virus, things will be delayed or shut down. If things improve, the testing is ramped up and the data shows a decrease in the numbers of infections and a reduction in severity, especially if a viable vaccine is produced in the near term, things will approach some semblance of normality.
    It's not funny.

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    Widespread testing with near immediate results.

    It is the only way.

    Otherwise.....addressing rolling waves of infection with week old information. Over and over again. No chance for the economy to recover.

    How can we address any issue of a national scale when individual states are tasked with controlling almost every aspect of this pandemic? Patchwork testing, different societal rulesets for each state, competition between various government entities for supplies. The "we just gotta learn to live with this pandemic and get back to normal" folks haven't even looked at the economic model of the future. Just what is your health insurance going to look like a year from now? Believe me, the future cost of intensive care is going to be even more jaw dropping than it is now and our current "employee based" health insurance model is simply not going to work. Not when 20% of the population is unemployed. This pandemic has rendered our health care economic model obsolete and it will remain that way until a vaccine is widely distributed. I know this because herd immunity requires about 60% of the overall population to be exposed to infection. With an estimated 4.5 % regional exposure, NYC emergency rooms looked like a post apocalyptic Mad Max movie.

    Back to the topic: We won't get to fall sports. Our brief little summer experiment is going to let the genie out of the bottle again.
    I miss Mike Hart

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    Quote Originally Posted by MickMick View Post
    Widespread testing with near immediate results.

    It is the only way.

    Otherwise.....addressing rolling waves of infection with week old information. Over and over again. No chance for the economy to recover.

    How can we address any issue of a national scale when individual states are tasked with controlling almost every aspect of this pandemic? Patchwork testing, different societal rulesets for each state, competition between various government entities for supplies. The "we just gotta learn to live with this pandemic and get back to normal" folks haven't even looked at the economic model of the future. Just what is your health insurance going to look like a year from now? Believe me, the future cost of intensive care is going to be even more jaw dropping than it is now and our current employee based health insurance is simply not going to work.

    Back to the topic: We won't get to fall sports. Our brief little summer experiment is going to let the genie out of the bottle again.
    I have heard that having different rules for different states is compared to having a peeing section in the swimming pool.
    It's not funny.

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    'I found it is the small everyday deeds of ordinary folk that keep the darkness at bay… small acts of kindness and love.'
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    CBB is a bridge season sport. Well situated — relatively speaking— to start in January, run thru April.

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    I imagine NCAA will take a queue from the NBA. According to The Athletic, the NBA is sorting through ‘a lot of bad options.’

    https://theathletic.com/1803630/2020...shared_article

    I could see modified schedules where schools play other local schools so there is no need to navigate airports, hotels, and restaurants. Players will show up dressed to play, walk on to the court, play, leave and go home, no locker rooms.

    I think NCAA will be more conservative in its approach than professional leagues since the players are students, not employees.


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    The NBA is also sorting thru options in May, not for September or even November.


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    Quote Originally Posted by MickMick View Post
    Widespread testing with near immediate results.

    It is the only way.

    Otherwise.....addressing rolling waves of infection with week old information. Over and over again. No chance for the economy to recover.

    How can we address any issue of a national scale when individual states are tasked with controlling almost every aspect of this pandemic? Patchwork testing, different societal rulesets for each state, competition between various government entities for supplies. The "we just gotta learn to live with this pandemic and get back to normal" folks haven't even looked at the economic model of the future. Just what is your health insurance going to look like a year from now? Believe me, the future cost of intensive care is going to be even more jaw dropping than it is now and our current "employee based" health insurance model is simply not going to work. Not when 20% of the population is unemployed. This pandemic has rendered our health care economic model obsolete and it will remain that way until a vaccine is widely distributed. I know this because herd immunity requires about 60% of the overall population to be exposed to infection. With an estimated 4.5 % regional exposure, NYC emergency rooms looked like a post apocalyptic Mad Max movie.

    Back to the topic: We won't get to fall sports. Our brief little summer experiment is going to let the genie out of the bottle again.
    Agreed 100%
    Different states with different plans will make national sports a no go.
    "You miss 100% of the shots you don't take."
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    Quote Originally Posted by sylean View Post
    in 1968-69, Hong Kong flu killed 1 million people worldwide and in the US, 100,00 people and yet we had time to go to the moon and have woodstock....

    viruses will always be with us.....
    I think it is important to keep in mind that it took about 15 months for the hong kong flu to get to 100,000 deaths in USA, and it had almost wide open public practices with no extreme public safety precautions taken. I was in grad school in Calif then and I cannot remember any attention payed to washing hands or social distance, although I read an article today claiming there was some attention to that. I don't know how the author got that impression, perhaps some health authorities urged those measures somewhere in newspapers or evening news. Although the phrase Hong Kong Flu does ring a bell in my memory, I honestly cannot remember anybody talking about it, I was not aware of it at the time, and all the grad students I associated with behaved exactly the same before, during, and after the H.K. flu. The classrooms were packed because the baby boom was washing into the colleges. Covid 19 looks it will reach the same number of deaths in about four months, and that is in spite of drastic measures taken nation wide. Anyone want to speculate where US deaths would be right now without the extreme measures? If we can get red and blue ideological refrains out of our minds for a moment, it seems to be a fact that Covid 19 is far more contagious with similar death rates. Comparing death rates now to those in late 60's should also take into account the considerable increase in medical advances made in those 50 years, in my view.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hockeyzag View Post
    Agreed 100%
    Different states with different plans will make national sports a no go.
    I too agree 100% w MickMick and you here hockeyzag. On ESPN this morning Jay Bilas opined leagues will play college football if at all possible regardless of what NCAA says simply because of the $ involved. If, say, classes remain fully online for fall I cannot imagine football players only or fall athletes only being allowed back on campus just so they can play. That would be putting $ ahead of students’ health. No way. Bilas is wrong here.

    NCAA President is right. If campuses remain closed in fall there will be no fall sports played. I also agree current lack of a national strategy to combat this virus is like having a peeing section in the swimming pool.
    It is their time....their team...I just get to watch. - Bartruff1

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    Quote Originally Posted by ZagsGoZags View Post
    I think it is important to keep in mind that it took about 15 months for the hong kong flu to get to 100,000 deaths in USA, and it had almost wide open public practices with no extreme public safety precautions taken. I was in grad school in Calif then and I cannot remember any attention payed to washing hands or social distance, although I read an article today claiming there was some attention to that. I don't know how the author got that impression, perhaps some health authorities urged those measures somewhere in newspapers or evening news. Although the phrase Hong Kong Flu does ring a bell in my memory, I honestly cannot remember anybody talking about it, I was not aware of it at the time, and all the grad students I associated with behaved exactly the same before, during, and after the H.K. flu. The classrooms were packed because the baby boom was washing into the colleges. Covid 19 looks it will reach the same number of deaths in about four months, and that is in spite of drastic measures taken nation wide. Anyone want to speculate where US deaths would be right now without the extreme measures? If we can get red and blue ideological refrains out of our minds for a moment, it seems to be a fact that Covid 19 is far more contagious with similar death rates. Comparing death rates now to those in late 60's should also take into account the considerable increase in medical advances made in those 50 years, in my view.
    Great post, IMO.

    US society also simply values human life far more today than 50 or 60 years ago just as wealthy countries value (pay more for) human lives than do poor countries today.

    We willingly pay much for each marginal increase in safety or life years (think what we paid to improve safety of transportation, consumer products, child welfare, medical expenditures broadly, end of life care specifically).

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    Default NCAA's Mark Emmert says fall sports likely a no-go if campuses are not open

    Quote Originally Posted by GonzagasaurusFlex View Post
    I too agree 100% w MickMick and you here hockeyzag. On ESPN this morning Jay Bilas opined leagues will play college football if at all possible regardless of what NCAA says simply because of the $ involved. If, say, classes remain fully online for fall I cannot imagine football players only or fall athletes only being allowed back on campus just so they can play. That would be putting $ ahead of students’ health. No way. Bilas is wrong here.

    NCAA President is right. If campuses remain closed in fall there will be no fall sports played. I also agree current lack of a national strategy to combat this virus is like having a peeing section in the swimming pool.

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    Last edited by Mr Vulture; 05-10-2020 at 10:56 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GonzagasaurusFlex View Post
    I too agree 100% w MickMick and you here hockeyzag. On ESPN this morning Jay Bilas opined leagues will play college football if at all possible regardless of what NCAA says simply because of the $ involved. If, say, classes remain fully online for fall I cannot imagine football players only or fall athletes only being allowed back on campus just so they can play. That would be putting $ ahead of students’ health. No way. Bilas is wrong here.

    NCAA President is right. If campuses remain closed in fall there will be no fall sports played. I also agree current lack of a national strategy to combat this virus is like having a peeing section in the swimming pool.
    Wouldn't having only the athletes on campus be the safest way to do it? Easier to do the testing, easier to maintain social distancing (aside from during practice and games, but the contact there can be limited by sport). The actual classes would be online anyway.
    It's not funny.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hockeyzag View Post
    Agreed 100%
    Different states with different plans will make national sports a no go.
    This is going to be a nearly insurmountable obstacle. It is too hard for teams to try following 50-51 separate standards. That becomes even more difficult as States implement their own plans regionally. Virginia is looking at potentially allowing some parts of the Commonwealth be less restrictive than others. Rural areas in the southwest might not need the same measures as Northern VA. Potentially that means UVa has different criteria than Virginia Tech.
    'I found it is the small everyday deeds of ordinary folk that keep the darkness at bay… small acts of kindness and love.'
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Vulture View Post
    Nice political garbage at the end. As usual, time to nuke this thread as some can’t avoid it.


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    Agreed. Rather than add my observations, allow me to say something we all can agree on:

    HAPPY MOTHERS DAY!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by TexasZagFan View Post
    Agreed. Rather than add my observations, allow me to say something we all can agree on:

    HAPPY MOTHERS DAY!!!
    Agree, Tex, Happy Mother's day to all that have bore what we men surely couldn't.

    There will be a mbb season, there are too many reasons to make it happen. Those smarter than you and I, Tex, will find the path around the obstacles.

    To counter the "political" card most of the world is getting tired of..., facts are facts.

    Spin is political.

    Excuses are political.

    ...

    Facts are facts.

    You know, WE can do this. For our grandchildren's grandchildren..., we will do this, Tex.

    As per LIZF, "it is us".
    Go ZAGS!

    Only watching the ball, misses at least 80% of the game.

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    This: "Widespread testing with near immediate results." Just saw an economist stating that retail businesses that can state that there employees are tested every day will go a long way towards getting their customers to return. Obviously not perfect, but very good. They are doing that in Switzerland, and the White House, right now.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DADoZAG View Post
    Agree, Tex, Happy Mother's day to all that have bore what we men surely couldn't.

    There will be a mbb season, there are too many reasons to make it happen. Those smarter than you and I, Tex, will find the path around the obstacles.

    To counter the "political" card most of the world is getting tired of..., facts are facts.

    Spin is political.

    Excuses are political.

    ...

    Facts are facts.

    You know, WE can do this. For our grandchildren's grandchildren..., we will do this, Tex.

    As per LIZF, "it is us".
    You want to see me get PO'ed at a politician, or one of my kids? Give me an excuse for not doing the job. Being responsible for your actions is a creed I've tried to live by, and it was burned in me 43 years ago.

    Reader's Digest version: as a new Platoon Leader, I coug'ed my first evaluation. It didn't matter that I was handed the platoon the day I returned from NBC Officer training (I'd been PL of another platoon for roughly 4 months). As that PL, I was "responsible for everything my unit did, or failed to do."

    I caught hell for about a month, deservedly so. That was the last time I ever failed any Army tac eval. More pointedly, over the following year, I took 3 more platoons through evaluations, and was a battery xo that unofficially took command after the CO went catatonic during a 3 day battery level evaluation. The stories are interesting only to me, so I'll spare the details.

    We're having to endure a whole litany of government and business executives who don't take responsibility for one damn thing, and their lack of action is costing American lives. I also worked during the bank crisis for the FDIC, and all I heard from bank presidents and officers were excuses. My bosses liked me because my after action reports had the unvarnished truth in black and white.

    I'm pretty much retired now, my main role is Big D's Opa. At the ripe old age of 9, he knows better than to make excuses while I'm around. His mom and his two uncles still get the same treatment when necessary. My wife is tougher than me...lol.

    There's a lot of good people trying to solve this thing, and they're the heroes. Doesn't mean they won't make mistakes, we all do. They're giving their all, and that's all we can ask.

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    thinking about what Emmert said, maybe it was more of a subtle threat....like get your act in gear or there will be no sports....its up to the college/university presidents and state regents whether there will be normal and open classes, not the NCAA....

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    At a smaller level, Gonzaga is completely at the mercy of what Washington and California decide to do, and neither is in a hurry to open things back up. I don't see fall sports happening at this point in the WCC unless they are delayed or there are very few practices. I am optimistic about winter sports.

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    The Cal State Universities (CSU) just announced they will not have students return for the fall semester.

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    Emmert says schools and states decide when schools start sports.


    https://www.espn.com/college-sports/...rk-emmert-says
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    free widespread testing, state sponsored sick leave for positive tests (asympto or otherwise), and contract tracing for quick evaluation and quarantine. these will have to be in place before the school year. there are no environments in this country that will spread a contagion faster than schools of any and all ages. People keep worrying about businesses opening, but the truth is there is no better barometer of our country reopening than schools. We can get there, but protections and measures must be in place by end of July. Until I see a SINGLE college saying we will use mass free testing and somesort of tracing app on a phone, I am highly skeptical.

    Jazz's comment about starting in January makes 110% sense to me. keep things fluid.

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