With March Madness 2020 unfortunately cancelled, here are some interesting facts about some of the "upsets" in previous Women's March Madness tournaments compared to the same numbers in the men's tournaments. It is very interesting to see how many of these upsets that Gonzaga has participated in. BYU and USF from the WCC have also been on the winning side of some of these upset.

NCAA Division I Women's Basketball Tournament upsets
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

This is a list of upsets by teams seeded 11 or higher that have occurred in the NCAA Division I Women's Basketball Tournament since the tournament expanded to 64 teams in 1994.

First round

16 vs. 1
The first 16 seed ever to win a game in an NCAA Division I basketball tournament was Harvard in 1998 against Stanford. According to an Associated Press retrospective on the 10th anniversary of the game in 2008, "The difference between the teams was much smaller than usual for a No. 1 and a 16 seed." Harvard had two years of tournament experience and the nation's leading scorer that season in Allison Feaster. Stanford suffered two devastating injuries during the run-up to the tournament. First, Vanessa Nygaard tore an ACL in the Cardinal's final regular-season game against Oregon State. Because the extent of her injury was not known at the time the tournament field was selected, the Cardinal still received a 1 seed. Then, in the team's first practice after the tournament selection, leading scorer and rebounder Kristin Folkl also tore an ACL.

The men's tournament has also seen only one 16 seed upset, it occurred in 2018, when UMBC knocked off overall top-seed Virginia, 74–54. Prior to UMBC's victory over Virginia, 16-seeds were winless in 135 attempts (since 1985) to defeat a 1-seed.

15 vs. 2 and 14 vs. 3
Unlike the men's tournament, in which eight (8) 15 seeds and twenty-one (21) 14 seeds have won their opening games since that tournament expanded to 64 teams in 1985, no 14 or 15 seed has ever won a game in the women's tournament. The closest any 15 seed came to winning was in 2017, when Long Beach State lost 56–55 to Oregon State.

13 vs. 4
Six 13 seeds have defeated 4 seeds in the first round.

By contrast, the men's tournament has seen 20 such upsets since 1994. Eight more occurred between 1985 and 1993, when the men's tournament featured 64 teams but the women's tournament had fewer entrants (32 in 1985, 40 from 1986 to 1988, and 48 from 1989 to 1993).

12 vs. 5
There have been twenty-two (22) 12-seeds to defeat 5-seeds in the first round. The men's tournament has seen 38 such wins since 1994, with nine more taking place between 1985 and 1993.

11 vs. 6
Thirty-two 11 seeds have won their first-round games against 6 seeds. By contrast, 38 such upsets have occurred in the men's tournament since 1994, with 13 more occurring between 1985 and 1993.

Second round

16 seeds
Harvard, the only 16 seed to advance to the second round, lost to Arkansas in the second round. No 16 seed has ever advanced to the Sweet Sixteen in either the men's or women's tournaments.

15 and 14 seeds
Unlike the men's tournament, in which one 15 seed and two 14 seeds have won their second-round games since that tournament expanded to 64 teams in 1985, no 14 or 15 seed has ever won a game in that round.

13 seeds
Three 13 seeds have won their second-round games, compared to six in the men's tournament (five of which occurred since 1998). All three of the winning 13 seeds in the women's tournament defeated 5 seeds.

12 seeds
Four 12 seeds have won their second-round games, as opposed to 13 in the men's tournament since 1994 and seven more from 1985 to 1993. All three 12 seeds to win at this stage of the women's tournament defeated 4 seeds.

11 seeds
A total of twelve 11 seeds have won their second-round games and advanced to the Sweet 16. This compares to 14 in the men's tournament since 1994, with seven more occurring between 1985 and 1993.
Since no 14 seed has ever advanced to this point in the women's tournament, all defeated teams were 3 seeds.

Sweet Sixteen

13 seeds
To date, no 13 seed, in either the men's or women's tournament, has advanced to the Elite Eight.

12 seeds
Unlike the men's tournament, in which one 12 seed won its Sweet 16 game since 1985, no 12 seed has ever won a game in the women's tournament.

11 seeds
Only one team seeded 11 or lower has won in the Sweet 16 and advanced to the Elite Eight—11 seed Gonzaga in 2011, who defeated 7 seed Louisville. By contrast, four such teams have won at this stage in the men's tournament since 1994, with two more doing so from 1985 to 1993.

Elite Eight

No team seeded 10 or lower has ever advanced to the Final Four; Gonzaga lost its 2011 regional final 83–60 to Stanford. Oregon lost its regional final to UConn, 90–52, in 2017, as a 10 seed, and Lamar in 1991 lost their regional final in 1991. In the men's tournament, four 11 seeds and one 10 seed have advanced to the Final Four—10th seed Syracuse in 2016, and 11th seeds Loyola-Chicago in 2018, VCU in 2011, George Mason in 2006, and LSU in 1986. The lowest seed to advance to the Final Four in the Women's Tournament is Arkansas, in 1998. The Razorbacks were a 9 seed that season.
If you want to see the teams and scores for each game noted above, they can be found at this link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NCAA_D...rnament_upsets

As is to be expected, the vast majority of these upsets are mid-majors taking down P5 conference teams or P5 teams taking down other P5 teams. There are those few occasions where the mid-major is the higher ranked team that has been upset by a P5 team, like Florida taking down Dayton in 2014 (11 vs. 6), West Virginia taking down Xavier in 2007 (11 vs. 6), Texas A&M edging by San Diego State in 1994 (2nd Rd - 13 vs 5), and Kansas eliminating Delaware (with Elena Della Donne) in 2012 (2nd round - 11 vs 3).

When comparing the upset numbers for both the Mbb and Wbb March Madness, the disparity between #1-seeds thru #4 seeds and their corresponding opponents (#13-see thru - #16 seed) is much greater in the Wbb's game than the men's game, as I think most would have expected. However as you reach the #12-Seed vs the #5-seeds, there still is a relatively large disparity but the numbers between Mbb and Wbb is closing and by the time you get to the #11-seed vs #6 seed, the number of upsets that have occurred are almost the same between Mbb and Wbb.

The Wbb's game has a ways to go to reach the level of parity in the Mbb's game. The Top 5 (or so) teams in the Wbb's game are certainly a significant step above the teams ranked 6-15 with another step between teams ranked 16-50 (or thereabouts). This step in parity is not near as great in the Mbb game. However, it would appear that the Wbb is starting to bring more parity to the Wbb game in recent years with the parity between teams ranked 17-50 being relatively close to the parity between teams rank in the same place in the Mbb game.

ZagDad