Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Gonzaga vs. BYU By the Numbers

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    876

    Default Gonzaga vs. BYU By the Numbers

    • BYU shot 10 percent better from the field.
    • BYU shot 40 percent on 3 point shooting (11/27). Gonzaga shot 20 percent (5/25).
    • Gonzaga had an exceptional free throw shooting night at 82 percent (vs. BYU's 77 percent).
    • Gonzaga won the rebound game 39 to 31 (14-7 on offensive rebounds).
    • BYU had more assists (22 vs. 15) and moved the ball better.
    • Gonzaga had 14 turnovers compared to 10 for BYU.
    • 60 percent of the foul calls were against BYU (15 to Gonzaga and 21 to BYU).

    To me, the numbers say it all. The Zags didn't shoot the ball well enough, turned the ball over, and didn't capitalize on offensive opportunities. BYU stuck around, played physical, and won the game. They had the home crowd advantage. Our guys couldn't get in a groove, despite Kispert, Tillie, Gilder, Petrusev being in double digits on points. We needed more scoring but failed to manufacture those scoring opportunities. We didn't see a guy last game like Hachumura or Clarke or Karno who can score at will.

    We will play a Big 12, Big East or ACC team in the tournament who plays physical and has skill and athleticism that exceeds that of BYU.

    How does Gonzaga work on adjustments in practice to prepare for this? If we face a Florida State, Baylor, Big East or some other physical and athletic team that believes they can take down Gonzaga on any given night (much like BYU, to their credit), what adjustments are needed for the Zags to be victorious?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    4,952

    Default

    In regard to adjustments, in practice I'd have the bigs post up ad nauseum with a dropping down from the wing or coming from underneath and digging at the ball. They need to learn how to value the ball and also how to find the open player when the double comes. The blueprint is there on how to beat the Zags and it's time to turn a weakness into a strength.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    876

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JPtheBeasta View Post
    In regard to adjustments, in practice I'd have the bigs post up ad nauseum with a dropping down from the wing or coming from underneath and digging at the ball. They need to learn how to value the ball and also how to find the open player when the double comes. The blueprint is there on how to beat the Zags and it's time to turn a weakness into a strength.
    Do you remember Sacre how he always used to catch the ball at his shoulders or above his head then bring the ball down to his waist before trying to dunk it or lay it in? This was so frustrating to watch as a fan and he never seemed to kick that habit. He seemed to get stripped a lot based on this one habit alone. Is there anything that you can point to for Petrusev or Tillie that if resolved immediately would prevent getting stripped on the double team? Or is it just a body positioning and strength thing?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Sandy Eggo CA
    Posts
    704

    Default

    Too bad this couldn't have been the first thread posted after the game. All those bad loser board trolls might have stayed under the bridge. Well, no, they wouldn't have. What am I thinking?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    4,952

    Default

    This gets a bit deeper into the armchair coach side of things, and makes me a bit uncomfortable to go there, but I think that with repetition one could sense the timing of the double team better and have a plan to counter it. Mentally, one can get more used to the contact and learn how to play through it instead of going into a turtle shell (if you are having a hard time scoring, you can still focus your energy on rebounding and playing defense, for example). Teammates could be better about recognizing that their guy is dropping off to double team, calling it out, and finding an open place on the floor (ie developing a counter). For example, when the Zags left Lee to double team Childs, Lee went straight to the rim for an easy dunk. Most Zag bigs have been used to being double teamed in the past but they seemed mystified by this last game.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    876

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JPtheBeasta View Post
    This gets a bit deeper into the armchair coach side of things, and makes me a bit uncomfortable to go there, but I think that with repetition one could sense the timing of the double team better and have a plan to counter it. Mentally, one can get more used to the contact and learn how to play through it instead of going into a turtle shell (if you are having a hard time scoring, you can still focus your energy on rebounding and playing defense, for example). Teammates could be better about recognizing that their guy is dropping off to double team, calling it out, and finding an open place on the floor (ie developing a counter). For example, when the Zags left Lee to double team Childs, Lee went straight to the rim for an easy dunk. Most Zag bigs have been used to being double teamed in the past but they seemed mystified by this last game.
    What I loved so much about last year's team was the assists down low from Rui to Clarke and vice versa. I don't see that with our bigs this year. Would love to see Petru, Tillie and our Texan Freshman look out for each other a bit more in the paint, which might also be one of the ways we can better deal with double teams.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •