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Thread: Kobe RIP - OT

  1. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ladyzag12 View Post
    It is super hard to hear about the loss of his daughter and the other family on board, but I won't forgive him for what he did in Colorado. He is up there with Big Ben as reprehensible athletes who stood above justice.
    This, is one of those things that says more about you than it does him.

    RIP Kobe. As a fellow father of a basketball playing daughter, a part of the sorrow I am feeling is for the support and advocacy you had for our girls. Very sad day for many people across the world.

  2. #27
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    I watched the Grammy awards tonight, and ALISHA KEYS and really so many, really handled this tragic news so beautifully. I'll say one thing, Kobe was a GIANT of a man. You could feel it and outside that arena tonight. I've been looking at pics of him with his daughter today. It's just too sad. too sad to even talk, which is tough for me. The thing that expresses my feelings the most are the tears that have flowed down by face today and the ache in my heart and my gut. This kind of thing is just too unbearable really. To witness how much he is loved by others says it all for me. AND TO think that his daughter and her friend, two 13 year old girls going to a girls basketball with Gigi's dad......Kobe loved kids...That says a lot too.

    The world misses you all alot....maybe the tears being shed can bring some healing to Americans. We certainly need it. RIP God bless your family, friends and fans.
    Go Zags!!! The Best Is Yet To Come!!!

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    Kobe's legacy is complicated, but his work ethic and intensity are perhaps unparalleled. It is incredibly sad to think especially of the young lives lost in the crash.

    If I recall correctly, Kobe was helpful to Ronny and his family during his heart surgery. He certainly seemed to be a good teammate to Rob Sacre, and I believe he also defended Adam Morrison on Jimmy Kimmel, pointing out that he was still a fantastic player.

    RIP Kobe.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4-oh-6 View Post
    This, is one of those things that says more about you than it does him.

    RIP Kobe. As a fellow father of a basketball playing daughter, a part of the sorrow I am feeling is for the support and advocacy you had for our girls. Very sad day for many people across the world.
    I don't think he's morally culpable for what did or didn't happen in Colorado, given she refused to testify, and went quiet over a healthy payment, but turning the attack back around on Ladyzag12 isn't the play.

    I add my name to the list of millions of people world wide who is hurt about losing a seemingly-immortal person on the court, and the person he was becoming off the court. Yesterday was surprisingly tough for my wife and I. He impacted lives from LA to Shanghai, won titles through stubbornness and perseverance. In life after basketball, he won an Oscar, promoted women's basketball and causes to make a better world for his daughters, and seems that he was embracing the human experience in every way. He embodied greatness in everything he did, and even Mark Few said in the phone interview with The Spokesman that he approached life after basketball with the same intensity that he did on the basketball court. He was truly a special person and this one hurts.
    Quote Originally Posted by Reborn View Post
    Go Zags!!!

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    By all accounts, the aftermath of that incident appears to have caused him to rethink aspects of his life, including a return to his practice of the faith.

    As a father, one of the hardest things for me about these sorts of tragedies is hearing of those he's left behind, his wife, oldest daughter, and two young daughters, who have lost their father and daughter/sister. It makes you look at your own wife and children, and think of the incredible sorrow that they'd experience if something similar happened, leaving a hole in the family behind. Condolences and prayers for them, and may he and his daughter, and the other 7 victims, rest in peace.
    I will thank God for the day and the moment I have. - Jimmy V

  6. #31
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    Story at The Atheltic about Gianna Bryant.

    I do not think subscription is required for this story.

    https://theathletic.com/1563301/?source=twitterhq

    Rip Kobe, Gianna and other helicopter occupants.
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    "thnk god for few" jazzdelmar(12/12/11 12:50pm)
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    "When most of us couldn't buy a basket. Where do we get off anyway?!" siliconzag (11/17/06 5:45:41 pm)
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    I am monitoring the price of a donut
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  7. #32
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    Please, don't take this wrong but...

    Tragedy is when a husband and father of a family that is living paycheck to paycheck is killed, leaving behind a wife and other children. Their future is one of not knowing if they will be able to keep the house, uncertainty about food and the utilities getting paid, concern about medical costs.

    I agree that losing Kobe is a blow, even though I was not a big fan, but his family is taken care of for several generations. Let's not lose perspective.
    Hoping you have a sense of humor too!

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by willandi View Post
    Please, don't take this wrong but...

    Tragedy is when a husband and father of a family that is living paycheck to paycheck is killed, leaving behind a wife and other children. Their future is one of not knowing if they will be able to keep the house, uncertainty about food and the utilities getting paid, concern about medical costs.

    I agree that losing Kobe is a blow, even though I was not a big fan, but his family is taken care of for several generations. Let's not lose perspective.
    With all due respect, when my father died at 43, I don't think we felt the tragedy any less just because he happened to have a life insurance policy.
    Agent provocateur

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by willandi View Post
    Please, don't take this wrong but...

    Tragedy is when a husband and father of a family that is living paycheck to paycheck is killed, leaving behind a wife and other children. Their future is one of not knowing if they will be able to keep the house, uncertainty about food and the utilities getting paid, concern about medical costs.

    I agree that losing Kobe is a blow, even though I was not a big fan, but his family is taken care of for several generations. Let's not lose perspective.
    I agree with sonuva. The tragedy isn't the financial blow (or lack thereof), but the loss of a father and husband, daughter and sister.
    I will thank God for the day and the moment I have. - Jimmy V

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    Quote Originally Posted by sonuvazag View Post
    With all due respect, when my father died at 43, I don't think we felt the tragedy any less just because he happened to have a life insurance policy.
    Quote Originally Posted by webspinnre View Post
    I agree with sonuva. The tragedy isn't the financial blow (or lack thereof), but the loss of a father and husband, daughter and sister.
    But not the loss of a house, a shortage of food and medical care and a lack of clothing? That is the piling on to the loss of spouse and father, brother and sister.

    People that live paycheck to paycheck don't have life insurance policies, and I would bet that there are far more of those than ones that do have policies.
    Hoping you have a sense of humor too!

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    Quote Originally Posted by willandi View Post
    But not the loss of a house, a shortage of food and medical care and a lack of clothing? That is the piling on to the loss of spouse and father, brother and sister.

    People that live paycheck to paycheck don't have life insurance policies, and I would bet that there are far more of those than ones that do have policies.
    That's all true, but money doesn't ease the pain of loss. I bet you that Kobe's wife and surviving children would give up every last cent to have their family whole again. As somebody who works with a lot of very difficult end of life situations, I can assure you that while you are correct in stating that lack of financial resources complicates things, the presence of financial resources doesn't make suffering any less profound.

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    Quote Originally Posted by willandi View Post
    But not the loss of a house, a shortage of food and medical care and a lack of clothing? That is the piling on to the loss of spouse and father, brother and sister.

    People that live paycheck to paycheck don't have life insurance policies, and I would bet that there are far more of those than ones that do have policies.
    Dude. You're missing the point. My family had a negative net worth when my father died and we came into what was for us a substantial change in wealth. Yes, we were thankful for it, but it wasn't like we felt the loss of the person we loved any less.
    Agent provocateur

  13. #38
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    The sudden tragic loss of cultural icons hits us in ways that are hard to verbalize. Some of those icons transcend their fields of endeavor and their passing takes on a bookmark for the generations most affected by the news.

    Folks of my vintage -- born in the late 1950's -- absorbed the news of 11/22/63 differently than our parents or grandparents. People born in the late 80's and 90's undoubtedly have a different view from mine of the world. That younger, different reaction to this latest instance of greatness passing too soon is informed by a world view as valid as any. 1/26/20 will become a cultural bookmark in a similar fashion.

    When I learned the news yesterday, my mind flashed to where I was when I learned of the Challenger explosion. Others might have been reminded of Buddy Holley, Patsy Cline, Harry Chapin, Jim Croce, Thurman Munson, Stevie Ray Vaughn. Sadly, the list of names we've said farewell to via tragic, unexpected departures from the floodlights is a long one. Time gives these disruptions to us at random. They chip away at our well-being, unsettling our lives' equilibrium in ways others cannot truly fathom. We share our grief collectively while wearing our individual sorrow.

    If you're a parent, your heart aches for the fathers and mothers left behind. If you're a sibling, you mourn for the brothers and sisters robbed by cruel fate of the chance once again to say you love them, to give them a hug, or to play games together. If you're a friend you wish for one more chance to feel their presence. If you're a fan, you celebrate the good feelings, lasting impressions, and joyful moments brought by their performance.

    May the victims rest in peace.
    Last edited by RenoZag; 01-27-2020 at 01:21 PM.

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by RenoZag View Post
    The sudden tragic loss of cultural icons hits us in ways that are hard to verbalize. Some of those icons transcend their fields of endeavor and their passing takes on a bookmark for the generations most affected by the news.

    Folks of my vintage -- born in the late 1950's -- absorbed the news of 11/22/63 differently than our parents or grandparents. People born in the late 80's and 90's undoubtedly have a different view from mine of the world. That younger, different reaction to this latest instance of greatness passing too soon is informed by a world view as valid as any. 1/26/20 will become a cultural bookmark in a similar fashion.

    When I learned the news yesterday, my mind flashed to where I was when I learned of the Challenger explosion. Others might have been reminded of Buddy Holley, Patsy Cline, Harry Chapin, Jim Croce, Thurman Munson, Stevie Ray Vaughn. Sadly, the list of names we've said farewell to via tragic, unexpected departures from the floodlights is a long one. Time gives these disruptions to us at random. They chip away at our well-being, unsettling our lives' equilibrium in ways others cannot truly fathom. We share our grief collectively while wearing our individual sorrow.

    If you're a parent, your heart aches for the fathers and mothers left behind. If you're a sibling, you mourn for the brothers and sisters robbed by cruel fate of the chance once again to say you love them, to give them a hug, or to play games together. If you're a friend you wish for one more chance to feel their presence. If you're a fan, you celebrate the good feelings, lasting impressions, and joyful moments brought by their performance.

    May the victims rest in peace.
    Well said.

    The initial shock makes it seem like it can't be real. I'm less than a month older than Kobe so this one hit home immediately, seeing his final age essentially the same as mine. I think the first time I deeply felt the loss of a cultural icon was with the news of Kurt Cobain's demise.

    Thanks to social media's proliferation of hoaxes, my first instinct was to scour Twitter to confirm the reality of the news even though I'd seen it first on what you'd expect to be a very reliable ESPN notification. In doing so, not only was it repeatedly confirmed, but the unfortunate details emerge of Kobe's daughter, her teammates, their parents and a coach. At that point, it becomes impossible not to feel a tremendous amount of grief.
    Agent provocateur

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    Pistol Pete 1988, Kobe 2020. Maravich was 40 years old, Kobe 41. Maybe in the future technology will allow us to watch them play against each other in their primes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JPW314159 View Post
    Pistol Pete 1988, Kobe 2020. Maravich was 40 years old, Kobe 41. Maybe in the future technology will allow us to watch them play against each other in their primes.
    For now, this is a starter. The Stockton/Williams and Maravich/Nash images got me teared up a little.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q3WG1Bv5aBE
    Quote Originally Posted by Reborn View Post
    Go Zags!!!

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    Thanks for the clip. I guess the tech might already exist. Now someone just has to put a lot of time into making the full game, and letting Pete Maravich get some 3 pointers!!!

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by zagfan24 View Post
    That's all true, but money doesn't ease the pain of loss. I bet you that Kobe's wife and surviving children would give up every last cent to have their family whole again. As somebody who works with a lot of very difficult end of life situations, I can assure you that while you are correct in stating that lack of financial resources complicates things, the presence of financial resources doesn't make suffering any less profound.
    Quote Originally Posted by sonuvazag View Post
    Dude. You're missing the point. My family had a negative net worth when my father died and we came into what was for us a substantial change in wealth. Yes, we were thankful for it, but it wasn't like we felt the loss of the person we loved any less.
    Losing everything is more tragic, in my opinion. The loss of family hurts,to be sure,and I have lost Mother,Father and Sister. Compounding that with becoming, or in fear of becoming, homeless is, in my mind, much more tragic. (I won't even delve into the economics that breeds a family income that doesn't allow for a life insurance policy [I don't have one but my kids have flown and the house is paid for, so my disabled wife would not be completely out])

    You are more than welcome to disagree with me, but I am entitled to my opinion...and on that date in November 1963, I was in the 10th grade. We still had the 'get under your desk, put your head between your knees and kiss you a** goodbye' drills.
    Hoping you have a sense of humor too!

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    Quote Originally Posted by willandi View Post
    Losing everything is more tragic, in my opinion. The loss of family hurts,to be sure,and I have lost Mother,Father and Sister. Compounding that with becoming, or in fear of becoming, homeless is, in my mind, much more tragic. (I won't even delve into the economics that breeds a family income that doesn't allow for a life insurance policy [I don't have one but my kids have flown and the house is paid for, so my disabled wife would not be completely out])

    You are more than welcome to disagree with me, but I am entitled to my opinion...and on that date in November 1963, I was in the 10th grade. We still had the 'get under your desk, put your head between your knees and kiss you a** goodbye' drills.
    Perhaps when viewed from a distance, you're right, but pointing out someone's loss is not as tragic as it could be because they have money to get through it is not the kind of perspective I'd try to impart on the bereaved.
    Agent provocateur

  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by sonuvazag View Post
    Perhaps when viewed from a distance, you're right, but pointing out someone's loss is not as tragic as it could be because they have money to get through it is not the kind of perspective I'd try to impart on the bereaved.
    Look through this weeks Obits in your local paper. Why aren't we discussing any/all of those as tragic?

    I understand that Kobe's wife would give up money to have him back...but would she choose to be homeless? I don't think so.
    Hoping you have a sense of humor too!

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by willandi View Post
    Look through this weeks Obits in your local paper. Why aren't we discussing any/all of those as tragic?

    I understand that Kobe's wife would give up money to have him back...but would she choose to be homeless? I don't think so.
    If Kobe hadn't been on their helicopter, but three 13-year-old girls still died along with their relatively unremarkable parents, it would still be a sensational news story. This was a tragedy without Kobe being on board.

    Do I think Vanessa Bryant would be willing to be homeless to have Kobe back? Maybe. I don't know. She was with him since she was 17. She filed for divorce in 2011 and changed her mind two years later. Who knows? Do I think she'd be willing to be homeless to have her daughter back? You bet I do.

    Besides, no one chooses to be homeless. When people are in desperate need of financial support, they reach out to their community and more often than not, they find a way. Financial hardship is an obstacle to overcome and people do it all the time.

    I suppose when children lose both parents at the same time, it's more tragic than losing one. And when over 20 teenagers die on a bus to their hockey game, it's more tragic than when three teenage girls die in a helicopter on the way to a basketball game ... but what is the purpose in trying to quantify the level of tragedy? No matter what happens, it can always be worse. As Zag24 said, the suffering of losing a child or a spouse in the prime of their life is profound. Trying to minimize it is rude, at best.

    Yes, you're entitled to your opinion. You also have a right to fart in a elevator if you want. It's just inconsiderate. That's the point here.
    Agent provocateur

  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by sonuvazag View Post
    If Kobe hadn't been on their helicopter, but three 13-year-old girls still died along with their relatively unremarkable parents, it would still be a sensational news story. This was a tragedy without Kobe being on board.

    Do I think Vanessa Bryant would be willing to be homeless to have Kobe back? Maybe. I don't know. She was with him since she was 17. She filed for divorce in 2011 and changed her mind two years later. Who knows? Do I think she'd be willing to be homeless to have her daughter back? You bet I do.

    Besides, no one chooses to be homeless. When people are in desperate need of financial support, they reach out to their community and more often than not, they find a way. Financial hardship is an obstacle to overcome and people do it all the time.

    I suppose when children lose both parents at the same time, it's more tragic than losing one. And when over 20 teenagers die on a bus to their hockey game, it's more tragic than when three teenage girls die in a helicopter on the way to a basketball game ... but what is the purpose in trying to quantify the level of tragedy? No matter what happens, it can always be worse. As Zag24 said, the suffering of losing a child or a spouse in the prime of their life is profound. Trying to minimize it is rude, at best.

    Yes, you're entitled to your opinion. You also have a right to fart in a elevator if you want. It's just inconsiderate. That's the point here.
    No. The point is you want your opinion to be the one that matters, and it is...to you.
    Hoping you have a sense of humor too!

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    This terrible tragedy really hits close to home. The chopper took off at John Wayne Airport, which is literally a 5 minute drive from where I grew up as a kid. Not only that, but Kobe and a few other passengers in the chopper were Newport Beach residents. I grew up in Costa Mesa, but I went to high school in NB. My dad made his living as a property manager in NB.

    Strange story: my dad's former landlady owned a beach house in NB next to Dennis Rodman when Rodman was playing for the Bulls during the Jordan era. One night she was over at our house, and we were watching a Bulls game. Rodman, of course, had his hair colored in every way imaginable. My dad turned to Violet and said, "Oh by the way Violet, that guy right there is your new next door neighbor."

    She just about had a heart attack.

    A couple weeks later Rodman got cited by the NBPD for landing a chopper on the beach right in front of his house. The noise complaints (from all the partying) and citations got to the level where he was "forced" to sell his house and move to some private area in Irvine. But not before picking up a couple of tickets for driving his boat under the influence on Lido Island. My friend owns a clothing store on Balboa Island, and one day and Rodman and his sycophants came into the store. There must have been 15 of them. No wonder Rodman ran into money problems.

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