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Thread: Players getting paid

  1. #1

    Default Players getting paid

    I am curious what other people think about this. In my opinion they already get paid with a good education. I am sure there are people that disagree with me about this. I think if a kid wants to go to the NBA, Europe, Australia or something like that instead of playing in the NCAA thats fine. It seems like it would be weird to have one or two kids showing up in their brand new cars and sporting gold chains and it seems like it would change the experience. You would have players making more money than their coaches. Your thoughts?

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  2. #2
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    they get an education plus monthly stipend plus set up for life with connection alone that would be the envy of all the other students struggling with student loans....

    its going to diminish college sports...its going to give huge advantages to schools like oregon.......we could see freshmen coming in, having a great year, but not nba ready, being paid to transfer to a bigger school with big money incentives....

    no doubt Gonzaga has resources but do we really want to be in the money game?...

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    Quote Originally Posted by sylean View Post
    they get an education plus monthly stipend plus set up for life with connection alone that would be the envy of all the other students struggling with student loans....

    its going to diminish college sports...its going to give huge advantages to schools like oregon.......we could see freshmen coming in, having a great year, but not nba ready, being paid to transfer to a bigger school with big money incentives....

    no doubt Gonzaga has resources but do we really want to be in the money game?...
    For me, the answer is a simple NO. It's the main reason I have little interest in following the NBA. Someday we'll be left only with watching 8th graders play without pay.
    "Those who believe in telekinetics, raise my hand."
    —Kurt Vonnegut

  4. #4
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    It is already a Money game and has been for a long time. You don't think Gonzaga profits immensely from the Men's College BBall team? Look at enrollment records since the team took off. Look at all the nice new buildings going up, etc. What about TV deals, sponsorship's, etc. NIKE and ADIDAS. Oh, its a money game.

    To me a boils down to this.

    Too much money is made in College Basketball and the ones out there playing the game don't receive their fair share.

    I don't know what the answer is though.

  5. #5
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    I think the current system is just fine. With that said... we already have players with unequal resources due to family net worth. No one said life is fair. Work hard and earn a better life. And the idea that a player would outearn his coach is a reach. Players that good wont go to college. But even if that rare event happened, so what? People with unique skills, intellect, or appearance tend to be compensated higher. That's capitalism and I'm fine with it.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by ProVeeZag View Post
    For me, the answer is a simple NO. It's the main reason I have little interest in following the NBA. Someday we'll be left only with watching 8th graders play without pay.
    Simple answer in my opinion. If you want to get paid over and above what scholarship players are receiving then turn pro and do what you feel is best for you. Should the players receive a little more of a stipend, Maybe?
    If the NCAA allows student athletes to start getting paid or get involved with profitable contracts outside of their universities then they are professionals and should not be in the college game. Either you get payed for playing a sport or you don't, if you get paid you are a professional if you don't you are an amateur.
    There are people who argue that the schools and coaches are making money off the student athletes. My answer to that is of course they are! They are professionals! Do I like the fact that coaches or teachers can leave universities for a better job,no but that's life they are professionals. Schools run a business and coaches are part of that business. Students pay tuition to keep the business running. Scholarship athletes in major sports don't pay tuition thus fall under the guidelines of the NCAA as to keep things equal or as close to equal as possible amongst schools in their division. Could there be some minor improvements made to the system? Of course!
    Bottom line if your a pro you get paid and you don't belong in the college game.
    I'm all for giving kids opportunities but not when it kills the system that is built to give them opportunity in the first place!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by FloridaZagFan View Post
    Simple answer in my opinion. If you want to get paid over and above what scholarship players are receiving then turn pro and do what you feel is best for you. Should the players receive a little more of a stipend, Maybe?
    If the NCAA allows student athletes to start getting paid or get involved with profitable contracts outside of their universities then they are professionals and should not be in the college game. Either you get payed for playing a sport or you don't, if you get paid you are a professional if you don't you are an amateur.
    There are people who argue that the schools and coaches are making money off the student athletes. My answer to that is of course they are! They are professionals! Do I like the fact that coaches or teachers can leave universities for a better job,no but that's life they are professionals. Schools run a business and coaches are part of that business. Students pay tuition to keep the business running. Scholarship athletes in major sports don't pay tuition thus fall under the guidelines of the NCAA as to keep things equal or as close to equal as possible amongst schools in their division. Could there be some minor improvements made to the system? Of course!
    Bottom line if your a pro you get paid and you don't belong in the college game.
    I'm all for giving kids opportunities but not when it kills the system that is built to give them opportunity in the first place!
    I agree.

    To me the simplest solution is, if you are worried about athletes needing to be paid for using their name, likeness or image...DON'T USE THEM OR ALLOW THEM TO BE USED!
    I'm laughing. Why aren't you?

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    Default Antitrust dispute over college athlete compensation comes to SCOTUS

    Story Link: https://www.scotusblog.com/2021/03/a...-to-the-court/

    Background
    The NCAA is an organization with over 1,000 member colleges and universities. The group’s website describes the NCAA as “dedicated to the lifelong well-being and success of college athletes.” Under the NCAA’s rules, colleges and universities can pay for athletes’ legitimate educational expenses, such as tuition and fees, room and board, and books, as well as “modest” awards for athletic or academic achievements. But if athletes are paid for playing sports, they become ineligible under NCAA rules.

    The case before the Supreme Court on Wednesday, NCAA v. Alston, began as a class action filed in 2014 by Division I football and basketball players against the NCAA. The lawsuit argued that the NCAA’s restrictions on eligibility and compensation violate federal antitrust laws because the restrictions prevent college athletes from receiving fair-market compensation for their labor. A federal district court in California gave the athletes a partial victory. It ruled that the NCAA could not limit benefits related to education, but the court concluded that the NCAA could continue to restrict benefits that are unrelated to education. After the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit affirmed that decision, the NCAA went to the Supreme Court, which last year agreed to hear the case.
    Fourteen different briefs were filed in support of the athletes, including one from the Biden administration. In a brief signed by Elizabeth Prelogar, who will make her first oral argument appearance as acting solicitor general on Wednesday, the Department of Justice acknowledges that, for purposes of antitrust law, the “product that the NCAA and its member schools provide is unusual.” There must be some agreement among the schools to generate athletic competition, and the NCAA and the schools “have long marketed student-athletes’ amateur status as an essential attribute of intercollegiate sports.” But despite those unusual features, the DOJ concludes, the NCAA’s eligibility rules nonetheless should be subject to the more stringent standard of review.

    A brief by historians derides the concept of amateurism in elite college sports as a “myth that is neither necessary to the activity nor fair to the students who participate.” To the contrary, the scholars note, “top-tier college sports” have flourished even as “amateurism” in the athletes playing those sports has decreased. What’s more, the historians continue, the NCAA’s efforts to rely on amateurism as the basis to shield its eligibility rules from antitrust scrutiny is “profoundly unfair,” as those rules often led to coaches and schools making millions from poor students.

    And a group of former NCAA officials tells the justices that “the NCAA’s professed commitment to ‘amateurism’ has become a way of preserving the market that the NCAA has come to dominate, rather than a means of protecting and benefitting college athletes.” Despite a massive expansion in the revenue raised by major sports, the former officials note, the percentage of revenue actually devoted to financial aid has decreased.

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