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Thread: Milestone Marker

  1. #51
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    Happy Birthday Dixie!

  2. #52
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    HAPPY 49TH, DIXIE

  3. #53
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    Damn Dixie... you are catching up with me. Happy B-Day
    "And Morrison? He did what All-Americans do. He shot daggers in the daylight and stole a win." - Steve Kelley (Seattle Times)

    "Gonzaga is a special place, with special people!" - Dan Dickau #21

    Foo me once shame on you, Foo me twice shame on me.

    2012 Foostrodamus - Foothsayer of Death

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by DixieZag View Post
    Birthdays don't normally bother me.

    But tomorrow I have my last b-day before 5-"oh" and it is bothering me far more than my b-dat at 29 and 39.

    It's not like I didn't feel "middle aged" long ago. But 50 - a year away now - implies … adulthood?

    Oh well, I am not wishing myself happy birthday bc it's not my birthday, and I'm not looking forward to it tomorrow.

    Congrats to MMM, by the way, that is a cool post.
    happy birthday!

    Bring back the OCC

  5. #55
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    Ah, so all a guy has to do is wish himself a happy b-day and everyone joins in? That's nice of y'all.

    I am having a much better birthday than an hour ago, at which point I was still looking for my dog who had looked to have run away on it. Now he's back. Don't know where he went, somewhere deep in the woods, though. Bad idea during hunting season and cold nights in the 30s.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  6. #56
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    Happy Birthday.��
    MCMM 2020: Who Wants Some Cheese?

  7. #57
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    I used to be really down on birthdays until my wife shamed me a few years ago.

    I would say: "What is the big deal of 'attaining an age'? Why is that anything to be proud of?"

    She said: "It is celebrating that God has given you another year of life on Earth. Many people would have given near all they had to just have another year or two to live to see 40 and watch a child turn 14 or something, but did not get the chance."

    I admit it shamed me for taking health for granted so much. It did change how I view this. If one doesn't have their health, they really don't have much of anything. Or at least everything looks different in terms of stuff taken for granted.

    I am grateful to all of you and grateful for good health and good family on a happy 49th.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  8. #58
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    My oldest son just submitted all of his enrollment information for high school.
    MCMM 2020: Who Wants Some Cheese?

  9. #59
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    My oldest turned 9 today it's crazy to think he's halfway to being an adult.

  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzgirl_127 View Post
    My oldest turned 9 today it's crazy to think he's halfway to being an adult.
    I'm 71 and hoping I'm not quite there. My body disagrees,
    It's not funny.

  11. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by willandi View Post
    hoping I'm not quite there. My body disagrees,

    +1
    This post is for March Madness seeding purposes only.

  12. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzgirl_127 View Post
    My oldest turned 9 today it's crazy to think he's halfway to being an adult.
    As they get older, the days just go faster for mom and dad.

    Mine is 12.

    I try to remind myself every single day: "Don't look back with nostalgia or longing for when they were 4, cherish today bc in a few years you'll be dreaming of them being 12"

    So every single day I talk to her, joke with her, tell her it's more fun being with her now than at any point in her life.

    It means a lot to them.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  13. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by DZ View Post
    As they get older, the days just go faster for mom and dad.

    Mine is 12.

    I try to remind myself every single day: "Don't look back with nostalgia or longing for when they were 4, cherish today bc in a few years you'll be dreaming of them being 12"

    So every single day I talk to her, joke with her, tell her it's more fun being with her now than at any point in her life.

    It means a lot to them.
    Enjoy and cherish this year AS MUCH AS YOU CAN. Mine's 13, and everything changes. We still have an awesome, awesome relationship, but I won't be reading the Lord of the Rings to her anymore at bedtime.

  14. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by caduceus View Post
    Enjoy and cherish this year AS MUCH AS YOU CAN. Mine's 13, and everything changes. We still have an awesome, awesome relationship, but I won't be reading the Lord of the Rings to her anymore at bedtime.
    My thirteen year-old doesn’t want to grow up. He’s insisted that we read bedtime stories for several months. We’ve been reading Curious George, Dr. Seuss, and Biscuit night after night. About a week ago, he rediscovered Skippyjon Jones.
    MCMM 2020: Who Wants Some Cheese?

  15. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martin Centre Mad Man View Post
    My thirteen year-old doesn’t want to grow up. He’s insisted that we read bedtime stories for several months. We’ve been reading Curious George, Dr. Seuss, and Biscuit night after night. About a week ago, he rediscovered Skippyjon Jones.
    Boys take longer. I will say the same to you as I did DZ, but just a year later. Cherish it. Wish I were in your shoes.

  16. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by caduceus View Post
    Boys take longer. I will say the same to you as I did DZ, but just a year later. Cherish it. Wish I were in your shoes.
    It is great advice. It really is. We need to be reminded of it often.

    MCMM: Mine found Harry Potter at this age and she's now one book away from reading the whole series. Of course she's read other books but those were a bit more of a challenge and required her attention. We bought her an entire set. She has a favorite "nook" where she stays most of the day, in the sun room, with her phone, books, music and drawing pad. She put her books up all in a row on the window sill, put a few others, too. She likes having a small library there and we think she's taking a bit of ownership pride in it. She straightens them all up often. It's cute, but even better than she just dove in and didn't come back. Now we're buying Slytherin athletic shirts, and caps.

    Might try it?
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  17. #67
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    These are all really sweet stories about cherishing your kids at different ages <3
    I'm really enjoying all of us being home together, not feeling pressure to get to different activities, and my husband getting to see them all day too. I'm even looking forward to the school year, we're going to do online through our district. We're doing some renovations right now to hopefully make better work spaces for the boys and a place I can play nearby with the two year old.

    DZ, my oldest loves Harry Potter. He's read the first 4 books many times (we're making him take some time off between the later books since the Hogwarts kids are teenagers in 5 thru 7 and a bit angsty haha). He also really liked the Percy Jackson books and another series by that author. They're huge books, I seriously think he's read 2 million words since September (they tracked the words in books they read in library class). Those books got him interested in mythology.

  18. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzgirl_127 View Post
    These are all really sweet stories about cherishing your kids at different ages <3
    I'm really enjoying all of us being home together, not feeling pressure to get to different activities, and my husband getting to see them all day too. I'm even looking forward to the school year, we're going to do online through our district. We're doing some renovations right now to hopefully make better work spaces for the boys and a place I can play nearby with the two year old.

    DZ, my oldest loves Harry Potter. He's read the first 4 books many times (we're making him take some time off between the later books since the Hogwarts kids are teenagers in 5 thru 7 and a bit angsty haha). He also really liked the Percy Jackson books and another series by that author. They're huge books, I seriously think he's read 2 million words since September (they tracked the words in books they read in library class). Those books got him interested in mythology.
    Highly recommend the Fablehaven series if he's into mythology/magical creatures. It was one of our best reads. A brother and sister go to stay at grandpa's place. Turns out he's a "zookeeper" for mythical creatures. The stories are great. My daughter ranks it at the top, after Harry Potter and LOTR.

  19. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzgirl_127 View Post
    These are all really sweet stories about cherishing your kids at different ages <3
    I'm really enjoying all of us being home together, not feeling pressure to get to different activities, and my husband getting to see them all day too. I'm even looking forward to the school year, we're going to do online through our district. We're doing some renovations right now to hopefully make better work spaces for the boys and a place I can play nearby with the two year old.

    DZ, my oldest loves Harry Potter. He's read the first 4 books many times (we're making him take some time off between the later books since the Hogwarts kids are teenagers in 5 thru 7 and a bit angsty haha). He also really liked the Percy Jackson books and another series by that author. They're huge books, I seriously think he's read 2 million words since September (they tracked the words in books they read in library class). Those books got him interested in mythology.
    That is awesome. She has read other books but can lose her attention. My dad got her a series she likes, I can't even remember the name, it was pre-Potter. It's about an 11 year old girl who gets a foster dad who is a detective and the two of them work on cases. She loves it.

    To no one in particular, and I'm not positive I've said this before. But I used to have a real pill (opiod) issue, not positive it was totally out of control but wasn't "good." It has been 12 years this month since. You will note the same age as my daughter, two months before she was born. It just occurred to me as I saw this. I don't know if I've said anything, but I'm actually kind of proud of that. Now granny has all kinds of stuff all over the house and I don't even notice - never thought that would be possible.


    So, anyway, I am really glad this place stayed. Good job to mods and SR.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  20. #70
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    And I am envious.

    My daughters mother and I divorced when she was four. They live near Mobile, Alabama and I chose to move back to the west, to Wyoming as it happened. I loved my daughter but was not from the south and the culture drove me crazy.
    I supported my daughter, with the court ordered amount until I realized that my ex was having many different adults live in the house she got in the uncontested divorce on the amount of money I was sending, so switched to sending her clothes and personal items. We stayed in touch for the next many years. I visited when I could (not often enough) and made it to HS graduation, but not college. I had told her early on that I would not be able to pay college tuition. She decided to play French Horn because I had and she got a music scholarship to Loyola, New Orleans (not Jesuit, I know). After 1 year, she earned a Presidential, full ride.
    When she was almost 30, she came to visit and my now wife talked to her and found out that her mother had been telling tales out of school.
    We now are close and in regular contact. She got her degree from Loyola in Engineering and works for Northrup Grumman/Litton industries in Pascagoula designing the next generation of littoral Naval ships. She does 90% of her work from home, and is the best Mother I know. I have 3 grands, the eldest 22 1/2 and married for 3 years. We were able to be at her combo 21st Birthday Party and Wedding reception.
    I am hoping to move closer to Mobile (almost anything east of Spokane IS closer) but am hoping to get within an easy days drive. I want to be able to spend my last years sharing with her and the Grands.

    I am so envious of you guys.
    It's not funny.

  21. #71
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    Caduceus, thanks for the recommendation, we hadn't heard of that series before! When did you introduce LOTR? They've read 'The Hobbit' already, but husband thinks 9 is too young for LOTR (my best friend read it in 4th grade so 9 doesn't seem too young to me) we have shown them the movies once. My mind does not visualize fantasy books at all so I haven't read them and can't weigh in myself lol.

    That's a great milestone DZ, congratulations!

    Will&I I hope you find a great place to retire to that close to your grandkids (great-grandkids when that time comes!) I don't think I could live in some of the southern cities we've visited either, although we haven't spent time in the delta, Nashville seemed neat and not too far from there.

  22. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzgirl_127 View Post
    Caduceus, thanks for the recommendation, we hadn't heard of that series before! When did you introduce LOTR? They've read 'The Hobbit' already, but husband thinks 9 is too young for LOTR (my best friend read it in 4th grade so 9 doesn't seem too young to me) we have shown them the movies once. My mind does not visualize fantasy books at all so I haven't read them and can't weigh in myself lol.

    That's a great milestone DZ, congratulations!

    Will&I I hope you find a great place to retire to that close to your grandkids (great-grandkids when that time comes!) I don't think I could live in some of the southern cities we've visited either, although we haven't spent time in the delta, Nashville seemed neat and not too far from there.
    Thank you.I still want the mountains, so east Tennessee, west NC etc. 8-10 hour drive from almost everything on the eastern seaboard, New Orleans to NYC, south to Orlando and west to Kansas City (kind of. I'm doing most of that from memory).

    I still plan on vending at Highland Games and Ren Faires. They are just too much fun and I will need to continue to supplement my SS.
    It's not funny.

  23. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzgirl_127 View Post
    Caduceus, thanks for the recommendation, we hadn't heard of that series before! When did you introduce LOTR? They've read 'The Hobbit' already, but husband thinks 9 is too young for LOTR (my best friend read it in 4th grade so 9 doesn't seem too young to me) we have shown them the movies once. My mind does not visualize fantasy books at all so I haven't read them and can't weigh in myself lol.
    I think the issue with Tolkein's books is not so much any mature content, but rather the attention span of the reader/listener. Tolkein's prose is FULL of details about the land, terrain, maps, people, history, etc. It's also ONE LONG story, divided up into three books. That said, if one can get through the Hobbit, LOTR is probably fine. We started LOTR around age 9 or 10, after the Hobbit (which is an easier read and a good starter). After each book, we'd watch the corresponding movie. Fun times.

  24. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by caduceus View Post
    I think the issue with Tolkein's books is not so much any mature content, but rather the attention span of the reader/listener. Tolkein's prose is FULL of details about the land, terrain, maps, people, history, etc. It's also ONE LONG story, divided up into three books. That said, if one can get through the Hobbit, LOTR is probably fine. We started LOTR around age 9 or 10, after the Hobbit (which is an easier read and a good starter). After each book, we'd watch the corresponding movie. Fun times.
    Thanks! I wasn't concerned about maturity really, his argument was more the philosophy behind the book and how "deep" it is, would kiddo understand the allegory etc. I'm more of the mind that he can read it and enjoy it and if he doesn't fully get it, but enjoys it, great. Maybe he'll read it again when he's older and understand new things and see it through new eyes. I think I'm going to quietly put it on his bookshelf and see if he starts reading it.
    He finished the book on Norse mythology that I gave him Friday. We gave him "The Odyssey" too, so I'm sure he'll start that soon. I'm really glad that he doesn't get a ton of homework when school is in session, I think that's been a huge factor in making him the reader he is. I always felt so bogged down with homework by the time I was done there was no time (or energy) to read for fun. I hope he stays interested in reading as he gets older.

  25. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzgirl_127 View Post
    Thanks! I wasn't concerned about maturity really, his argument was more the philosophy behind the book and how "deep" it is, would kiddo understand the allegory etc. I'm more of the mind that he can read it and enjoy it and if he doesn't fully get it, but enjoys it, great. Maybe he'll read it again when he's older and understand new things and see it through new eyes. I think I'm going to quietly put it on his bookshelf and see if he starts reading it.
    He finished the book on Norse mythology that I gave him Friday. We gave him "The Odyssey" too, so I'm sure he'll start that soon. I'm really glad that he doesn't get a ton of homework when school is in session, I think that's been a huge factor in making him the reader he is. I always felt so bogged down with homework by the time I was done there was no time (or energy) to read for fun. I hope he stays interested in reading as he gets older.
    Yeah, the book read in elementary school will always be different the second time you get around to reading it to your kids. I did enjoy LOTR much more the second time around for the depth of the stories, but I remember being gripped at the edge of my seat the first time around in grades 4-6. Both good, just different. I once tried as a kid to read Tolkein's The Silmarillion, which is sort of a prequel of Middle Earth history, but boy, it's so dense (and ultimately uninteresting), it has a huge index of all the characters because it's impossible to keep track of them. Avoid that one!

    Do look for Fablehaven...I have the benefit of having a librarian for a sib, so she usually finds me real gems. There's another series I recommend -- The Underland Chronicles. It's by the author of The Hunger Games (Suzanne Collins), but written earlier and for younger audiences. It's about a couple of siblings that find a subterranean civilization living below NYC. More fantastical creatures.

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