Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 31

Thread: Mexican Food Versus Italian, and Indian, Chinese

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    17,476

    Default Mexican Food Versus Italian, and Indian, Chinese

    Is Mexican food better than all the others?

    Mexico is a beautiful country, great beaches, great weather, great altitude huge cities, and the one that is perhaps the one that most integrated the native populations in many ways.


    Does all that equate to the country with the world's best foods?


    It's damn well arguable.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    7,093

    Default

    Eastern Washington has a huge population of Mexican people and restaurants ....my grandmother was from Mexico..... I have to argue that Mexican food is essential for good health...... and point to Steinbeck's Tortilla Flat as a example of what can happen to you if you ignore Taco Bell for any extended period of time.... no muy bueno

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    17,476

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bartruff1 View Post
    Eastern Washington has a huge population of Mexican people and restaurants ....my grandmother was from Mexico..... I have to argue that Mexican food is essential for good health...... and point to Steinbeck's Tortilla Flat as a example of what can happen to you if you ignore Taco Bell for any extended period of time.... no muy bueno
    Yes, muy Bueno.

    Did your grandmother cook cool stuff?

    Another thing everyone. What do you put in homemade salsa?

    I think I put in tomatoes, shall chipped onions, some garlic, one hot pepper, fresh cilantro, and a bit of salt and vinegar.

    I then put them all in a blender for about 20 seconds, not enough so they all are vaporized, just enough for a great mix.

    Anyone got a better one? Any other dish that you are fond of?
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    17,476

    Default

    Anyone think Thai should be in the running? I kinda do.

    As everyone knows, it's a mix between strong Indian food, and southern China food. That's mixing some great stuff.

    Been forever since I have had good Indian food, but it kicks a lot of ass.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    On an island that is long
    Posts
    12,452

    Default

    I'd argue that TexMex is different that Mexican... which is different from Latin food in general. Give me Columbian/Dominican/Ecuadorean food any day
    "And Morrison? He did what All-Americans do. He shot daggers in the daylight and stole a win." - Steve Kelley (Seattle Times)

    "Gonzaga is a special place, with special people!" - Dan Dickau #21

    Foo me once shame on you, Foo me twice shame on me.

    2012 Foostrodamus - Foothsayer of Death

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    17,476

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LongIslandZagFan View Post
    I'd argue that TexMex is different that Mexican... which is different from Latin food in general. Give me Columbian/Dominican/Ecuadorean food any day

    I have heard the exact same point, and it is easy to see.

    Tex Mex is more red sauce, salsa, orange cheese beef or chicken.

    True Mexican (or just "Southern Mexico" is far more white sauce, white cheese, and more fish and shrimp. Even more simple as food goes.

    Okay, but I would argue that the Tex Mex is my favorite and maybe the best in the world.

    I was told once that the world has 3 classic and distinct foods, and everything is a variation on those three:

    French, Indian, Southern China Cantonese, which is quite different than Sichuan cuisine which I just now read is mixed with Russian.


    Some could argue that Mexican has no relationship between Spain, nor the U.S. but I guess they're talking traditional foods over centuries.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    On an island that is long
    Posts
    12,452

    Default

    For me the perfect dinner is Carne Asada, with Chicharron, Maduros, Rice with a fried egg on top and frijoles.
    "And Morrison? He did what All-Americans do. He shot daggers in the daylight and stole a win." - Steve Kelley (Seattle Times)

    "Gonzaga is a special place, with special people!" - Dan Dickau #21

    Foo me once shame on you, Foo me twice shame on me.

    2012 Foostrodamus - Foothsayer of Death

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    South Hill, Spokane
    Posts
    20,137

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LongIslandZagFan View Post
    I'd argue that TexMex is different that Mexican... which is different from Latin food in general. Give me Columbian/Dominican/Ecuadorean food any day
    Thank you. All about Sonoran food here, and one does not merely call that Mexican food.
    Once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    South Hill, Spokane
    Posts
    20,137

    Default

    Italian food is, for me, the most amazing, diverse and flavorful food I have ever enjoyed. Here you have ancient, diverse histories of food and drink - and celebratory eating - at the crossroads of the world.

    I once had pesto in the the tiny, Mediterranean village where it originated and it contained potatoes and green beans. Sicilian food alone heavily incorporates African, Greek and Italian traditions - and you wouldn't necessarily recognize it as Italian food. In Florence, where the leather trade is huge, you get a Nebraska-like meat-and-potatoes culture (no spinach in anything, unlike the American interpretations of "Florentine"). By the time you go up north, say, to Milan, the whole tradition changes again, and the dishes are so different (also includes craft beer)! Up in the Alps you get still more histories and foods.

    I cook and enjoy Mexican foods every week, and consider them incredibly close to my heart. But nothing bowls me over like real deal Italian food.
    Once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    South Hill, Spokane
    Posts
    20,137

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DixieZag View Post
    French, Indian, Southern China Cantonese, which is quite different than Sichuan cuisine which I just now read is mixed with Russian.
    I thought Belgians taught the French to cook.
    Once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    17,476

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TheZagPhish View Post
    Italian food is, for me, the most amazing, diverse and flavorful food I have ever enjoyed. Here you have ancient, diverse histories of food and drink - and celebratory eating - at the crossroads of the world.

    I once had pesto in the the tiny, Mediterranean village where it originated and it contained potatoes and green beans. Sicilian food alone heavily incorporates African, Greek and Italian traditions - and you wouldn't necessarily recognize it as Italian food. In Florence, where the leather trade is huge, you get a Nebraska-like meat-and-potatoes culture (no spinach in anything, unlike the American interpretations of "Florentine"). By the time you go up north, say, to Milan, the whole tradition changes again, and the dishes are so different (also includes craft beer)! Up in the Alps you get still more histories and foods.

    I cook and enjoy Mexican foods every week, and consider them incredibly close to my heart. But nothing bowls me over like real deal Italian food.
    It sounds incredible.

    Well written, too. I enjoyed just that aspect of the reply.

    Have you ever had real Indian food? The curry sauce with spice is one of the most complex dishes I have ever had. Wonderful.


    Chinese is hit and miss, isn't it? It can be some of the best food on earth, and then a bad dish of General Tso's , dripping in red sauce can made you swear it off for good.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    900

    Default

    Étouffée, Jambalaya, Gumbo, Boiled Crawfish.

    My wife is Cajun. From Louisiana. You have not experienced anything like sitting down at her table.

    Beignets, Pecan Pie.

    Iced Tea, Black coffee.

    It's remarkable that I am still reasonably thin.

    If you have never had shrimp and grits for breakfast, your life is incomplete.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MDJx...NhV8hF&index=7

    Father in Law used to listen to this music. The map they show about 30 seconds in shows the parishes. They were from St. Landry parish. Home was right on the bayou.
    Last edited by Markburn1; 06-19-2019 at 01:59 PM.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    On an island that is long
    Posts
    12,452

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DixieZag View Post
    It sounds incredible.

    Well written, too. I enjoyed just that aspect of the reply.

    Have you ever had real Indian food? The curry sauce with spice is one of the most complex dishes I have ever had. Wonderful.


    Chinese is hit and miss, isn't it? It can be some of the best food on earth, and then a bad dish of General Tso's , dripping in red sauce can made you swear it off for good.
    Chinese in Chinatown in NY... THAT is an adventure one must take in their lives. But gotta find a place where you a) possibly need an interpreter at the table with you and b) not be able to get real silverware and sticks is all they got. My dad knows a few places down there that are phenomenal and like nothing you think you know about Chinese food.
    "And Morrison? He did what All-Americans do. He shot daggers in the daylight and stole a win." - Steve Kelley (Seattle Times)

    "Gonzaga is a special place, with special people!" - Dan Dickau #21

    Foo me once shame on you, Foo me twice shame on me.

    2012 Foostrodamus - Foothsayer of Death

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    7,093

    Default

    The best thing I ever ate in a restaurant...... was halibut and chips...... in a small dock side place...... in Stewart Alaska....never disappoints ….

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Spokane
    Posts
    1,332

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bartruff1 View Post
    The best thing I ever ate in a restaurant...... was halibut and chips...... in a small dock side place...... in Stewart Alaska....never disappoints ….
    Catching up on things, bart. You are in my thoughts, had no idea about the trials you have found yourself in....

    I will send you thoughts every day, please open yourself to them. You will find many of us love the soul that lives in your body....

    ...may you find strength in the power from all the souls you have touched... and receive the power from all my love....

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    7,093

    Default

    Whoops Dad....I am not suffering....I am fine.....my health issues are all age related..... and are being treated and are stable..... I am pretty much pain free..... sharp as a tack...... and getting better looking every day..... and I feel great and am hiking and kayaking and riding motorcycles...as active as a 60 year old… please don't worry about me.....I am looking forward to the summer heat and the fall colors and the winter skiing..... and Gonzaga Basketball.....my tests were so good that we reran them to double check ….. I am sorry if I gave anyone the wrong impression....don't cut me any slack....bart

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    17,476

    Default

    Doesn't make anything he said wrong, Bart. You are appreciated throughout the blog, especially in the foo.

    LIZF - Chinatown? Sounds great. I have one quick strategy. Go to a bookstore or go online and pull up the Zagats for that area and type, go with the highest ranking ones. We did that in SF and were blown away.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    Posts
    1,384

    Default

    I regret not getting Chinese food in San Francisco, my old coworkers raved about a place we had walked past on our trip (of course they didn't rave about it before my trip, they waited until I got home to let me know what I passed up).
    I really enjoy Mexican and Chinese food, but I feel like I haven't had truly authentic Italian. I'm curious what Italian cuisine was like prior to the introduction of tomatoes from the new world.
    I've never given Indian food a try because I don't like a lot of the prominent spices used. I may have to give the milder flavored things a try sometime.
    If I had to vote I would pick Mexican because I'm always up for that for a meal, I kind of need to be in the mood for Chinese food.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Just north of I-80
    Posts
    44,954

    Default

    If you told me I was prohibited from eating all but one of the cuisines in the OP, I would choose Mexican.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    7,093

    Default

    Anything that is deep fried....even clams...

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    17,476

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RenoZag View Post
    If you told me I was prohibited from eating all but one of the cuisines in the OP, I would choose Mexican.
    I think that's right.

    Me, too.

    And I have to note it would be the Tex-Mex version, bc I love the spices.

    I would weigh 300 lbs - unless one avoids beans, rice and flour - I love the sauces, the salsa, etc.

    I am about a week away from going "all in" on my own salsa with most everything grown in my garden. I have tomatoes, peppers of varying heat, I have cilantro, and so I would need to buy a small onion, and add a dab of vinegar. Salt to taste.


    Again, if someone thinks it is missing something, I'd love to hear.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    Posts
    1,384

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DixieZag View Post
    I think that's right.

    Me, too.

    And I have to note it would be the Tex-Mex version, bc I love the spices.

    I would weigh 300 lbs - unless one avoids beans, rice and flour - I love the sauces, the salsa, etc.

    I am about a week away from going "all in" on my own salsa with most everything grown in my garden. I have tomatoes, peppers of varying heat, I have cilantro, and so I would need to buy a small onion, and add a dab of vinegar. Salt to taste.


    Again, if someone thinks it is missing something, I'd love to hear.
    I think the restaurant we like adds garlic to their salsa. I've never made it, so I don't have a recipe, but I swear there's a hint of garlic too.

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    17,476

    Default

    I have yellow squash ripening.

    They have virtually no taste, but are loaded with good vitamins if you eat raw (boiling takes out most vitamins).

    Since they have no real taste, I substitute chips for thin slices of yellow squash to dip for my salsa.

    I just slice thin, raw, and it is actually not bad. Not as good as good chips, but not bad either.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    17,476

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzgirl_127 View Post
    I think the restaurant we like adds garlic to their salsa. I've never made it, so I don't have a recipe, but I swear there's a hint of garlic too.
    Great idea.

    I've never eaten anything where I said "this garlic is bad" - - so I suspect that some real garlic chopped up to tiny bits would be really good. Will add it, bc it sounds great and never added it before.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Just north of I-80
    Posts
    44,954

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DixieZag View Post
    I think that's right.

    Me, too.

    And I have to note it would be the Tex-Mex version, bc I love the spices.

    I would weigh 300 lbs - unless one avoids beans, rice and flour - I love the sauces, the salsa, etc.

    I am about a week away from going "all in" on my own salsa with most everything grown in my garden. I have tomatoes, peppers of varying heat, I have cilantro, and so I would need to buy a small onion, and add a dab of vinegar. Salt to taste.


    Again, if someone thinks it is missing something, I'd love to hear.
    Don't skimp on the vinegar. Try Bermuda (red) onion instead of white or yellow. I also use bell peppers . Have fun


    Basketball Web Sites Listing

    "The most interesting place exists between how people see themselves and how other people do." -- Wright Thompson

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •