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Thread: Women's college basketball: Top 12 seniors for 2019-20

  1. #1
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    Default Women's college basketball: Top 12 seniors for 2019-20

    Just one person's (ESPN Writer) opinion on the top 12 Seniors for the upcoming year.

    Women's college basketball: Top 12 seniors for 2019-20
    Mechelle Voepel
    espnW.com
    May 8, 2019

    A month has passed since Baylor won the NCAA championship -- a time filled with team banquets, coaching hires and transfer-portal entries. So let's take an early look at some of the top seniors for the 2019-20 season -- players who will be a big part of the narrative on the road to New Orleans and should be in the mix as WNBA first-round draft picks a year from now.

    1. Sabrina Ionescu, Oregon, 5-11, guard
    2018-19 stats:
    19.9 PPG, 7.4 RPG, 8.2 APG
    Many expected her to be the first pick in the WNBA draft this year, but she wants another shot at the national championship. Ionescu led the Ducks to their first Final Four, and is one of the most dynamic players in the game, with 18 career triple-doubles.

    2. Lauren Cox, Baylor, 6-4 forward
    2018-19 stats:
    13.0 PPG, 8.3 RPG, 2.5 BPG
    The knee injury Cox suffered in the third quarter of the NCAA final wasn't as serious as feared, which was a big relief for her and Baylor. She has plenty of time to heal and should enter 2019-20 as Ionescu's top competitor for national player of the year.

    3. Crystal Dangerfield, UConn, 5-5 guard
    2018-19 stats:
    13.4 PPG, 3.3 RPG, 5.9 APG
    With Katie Lou Samuelson and Napheesa Collier gone, Dangerfield will be the senior leader for a team that must develop a new identity. She has risen to challenges before in her career, and she'll likely do the same this time.

    4. Ruthy Hebard, Oregon, 6-4 forward
    2018-19 stats:
    16.1 PPG, 9.1 RPG, 67.0 field goal percentage
    Like Ionescu, she got a taste of the Final Four and wants another chance at the title. She was second in Division I in field goal percentage this past season, and for her Oregon career has made 64 percent of her shots (735 of 1,148).

    5. Beatrice Mompremier, Miami, 6-4 forward
    2018-19 stats:
    16.7 PPG, 12.2 RPG, 52.8 field goal percentage
    She had a strong season for the Hurricanes after spending her first two years at Baylor. She could have gone to the WNBA draft, but came back. She had 22 rebounds in Miami's NCAA tournament second-round loss to Arizona State, but was 3-of-12 from the field. Consistency on offense will be her goal as a senior.

    6. Kaila Charles, Maryland, 6-1 guard
    2018-19 stats:
    17.0 PPG, 6.7 RPG, 2.3 APG
    The postseason was disappointing for the Terps, who fell in the Big Ten title game and the NCAA tournament's second round. But individually, Charles was at her best then, averaging 23.2 points and 8.4 rebounds, something she'll build on for her senior season. Whether she can add the 3-pointer to her skill set remains a question.

    7. Kiah Gillespie, Florida State, 6-2 forward
    2018-19 stats:
    16.2 PPG, 9.3 RPG, 1.8 APG
    She led the Seminoles in scoring, rebounding and 3-pointers (53) in her first season at Florida State after playing two years at Maryland. She should help Florida State, which exceeded expectations this past season, be one of the ACC's favorites in 2019-20.

    8. Tynice Martin, West Virginia, 5-11 guard
    2018-19 stats:
    18.0 PPG, 5.8 RPG, 1.7 APG
    An explosive scorer, she missed 2017-18 with injury, and could have gone to the WNBA draft this year. But she decided to stay with the Mountaineers, who played in the WNIT the past two seasons. Her goal will be to get them back to the NCAA tournament and boost her draft stock.

    9. Tyasha Harris, South Carolina, 5-10 guard
    2018-19 stats:
    10.9 PPG, 3.5 RPG, 5.3 APG
    She can score big when she needs to, but her ability to control the pace and defend for the Gamecocks is also key. She had her fewest turnovers of her career last season (55), but can she improve on her career 31.1 percent shooting from 3-point range?

    10. Tiana Mangakahia, Syracuse, 5-6 guard
    2018-19 stats:
    15.4 PPG, 4.8 RPG, 8.4 APG
    She was second in Division I in assists per game. And while she is well-known as a distributor, she can also score big (she had 44 points against Florida State on Feb. 28). The Orange's leader in scoring and assists, she was expected by some to enter the WNBA draft, but she opted for another season at Syracuse.

    11. Mikayla Pivec, Oregon State, 5-10 guard
    2018-19 stats:
    15.2 PPG, 9.2 RPG, 3.4 APG
    She has steadily improved each year, and was the rock for the Beavers this past season, leading them in minutes played (34.3 per game). She shot 52.6 percent from the field and 41.7 percent from 3-point range, although she took just 60 shots from long range. She might do more of that next season.

    12. Haley Gorecki, Duke, 6-0 guard
    2018-19 stats:
    17.2 PPG, 7.1 RPG, 3.9 APG
    Because of injuries to other Duke players, she had a lot on her plate this season. And she handled it well, leading the Blue Devils in scoring, rebounding, assists and steals.
    Article Link: http://www.espn.com/womens-college-b...eniors-2019-20

    We have some members on this board who continually call out for height, not only for the F/C positions but also at the guard position. While, I agree that with everything being equal, height is strongly desired, height does not define the limits for the player or the team.

    In the above article, of the 12 players noted, eight (8) were guards ranging in size from 5'5" to 6'1" with only two (2) of the eight (8) listed guards over six feet. The remaining four (4) players were all forwards ranging in size from 6'2 to 6'4" with three of the forwards being 6'4". It is about the quality and skills of the player and not her height, which will determine how far the basketball ceiling is for any individual player.


    That being said, a little more height is not a bad thing,

    ZagDad

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    There's no GU players on the list, how dare you post that here ZagDad. I'm kidding of course.

    Interesting list. Of course as you state just 1 person's opinion.

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    Quote Originally Posted by seacatfan View Post
    There's no GU players on the list, how dare you post that here ZagDad. I'm kidding of course.

    Interesting list. Of course as you state just 1 person's opinion.
    If you don't like Mechelle Voepel's opinion, how about we look at last month's draft and see what the 12 WNBA teams thought.

    If you go look at this year's draft, 36 players, there were only four (4) players over 6'4" drafted, and all were centers; Kelani Brown (6'7") from Baylor, Teaira McCowan (6'7") from Mississippi State, and two ladies from China who did not play college ball; Han Xu (6'9") and Li Yueru (6'7"). There were also several centers drafted that were 6'4" or shorter including Brianna Turner (ND-6'3"), Kristine Anigwe (Cal-6'4"), and Ezi Magbegor (Austrailia-6'4"). As one poster mentioned, the number of ladies available that are taller than 6'4", can play basketball, meet GU academic standards and want to play at GU is very small. We have been very lucky in the past, but our tallest girls still have "only" been 6'5" (Shelby & Emma & Anna), not the 6'7"+ ladies some of our opponents have. Any time you have a Top-50 player over 6'5" in height, the Top-10 teams are all over them making it very difficult for mid-major teams to recruit them.

    In the draft, the typical size for a drafted forward was in the 6'2" to 6'4" range. While there was not a single forward taller than 6'4" drafted, many, many of the drafted forwards were 6'3" or 6'4". The shortest drafted forwards were Napheesa Collier (UConn-6'2") and Anriel Howard (Mississippi St-5'11").

    If you don't count Katie Lou Samuelson as a guard (I don't, she is more of a wing), there were four (4) guards drafted in the 1st round, with two (2) being exactly 6'0" tall (Jackie Young @ ND & Kiara Leslie @ NC State) and two (2) were less than 6'0" tall (Asia Durr 5'10" @ Louisville & Arike Ogunbowale 5'8" @ ND). The second round had eight (8) guards drafted where three (3) guards were 6'0" or taller and five (5) guards were under 6'0". The three guards taller than 6'0" were all 6'1" in height. The third round had five (5) guards drafted where only one (1) guard was 6'0" or taller and four (4) guards were under 6'0". The single guard taller than 6'0" was exactly 6'0" in height. In summary, out of 36 draft selections, 17 of the selections were guards, where three (3) were exactly 6'0", eleven were under 6'0" in height and the three (3) tallest guards drafted reached 6'1" in height.

    Obviously, teams tend to value serious height at the center position, when it is available but even in the WNBA, only 4 selections exceeded 6'4" in height and only two of those played college ball. For forwards, 6'3" & 6'4" were far and away the most typical heights, but Napheesa Collier was drafted at #6 @6'2" in height while Anriel Howard @5'11" was drafted at #24. For true guards, height did not appear to be a major factor in a team's selection of a guard as the vast majority of the selected guards were clustered around the 5'8"-6'0" height ranges.

    The above being said, Chicago Sky head coach & GM James Wade said the primary reason he selected Katie Lou Samuelson with the #4 selection was due to a combination of her height (6'3") and ability to hit the 3 pt shot to stretch the defense of their opposition.

    Height is always welcome, but even in the WNBA, with the stark exception of a few true centers, the players are not of an outrageous height. Skill and ability will always carry you farther than just being tall. Now, if you have height and ability, then you may have a career in the WNBA.

    ZagDad
    Last edited by ZagDad84; 05-10-2019 at 09:40 PM.

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    Ha, I didn't mean to dispute your point about most of the best players not being exceptionally tall. More about which 12 were selected in the article as top Seniors. One substitution I would make for sure is DiJonai Carrington from Stanford for somebody, and she is well under 6-4.

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    Just giving you another point of view.

    Some people seem to think these oversized posts and oversized guards with strong abilities grow on trees and the lady zags are derelict in not recruiting these excessively taller ladies. My point was to show that; one, you do not have to have exceptional height to be successful as an individual or a team and 2) that excessive height at any specific position is just not that readily available. The Top 36 players in the world (college and internationally) as determined by the WNBA teams, show that, other than a true post/center, ability is valued much more than height. Obviously having both would be desired, but it just is not that common, even to the WNBA teams.

    More about which 12 were selected in the article as top Seniors. One substitution I would make for sure is DiJonai Carrington from Stanford for somebody, and she is well under 6-4.
    Mechelle Voepel tends to give the West the least amount of credit. I do not know how much West Coast Wbb she really watches. It shows in her Top 25 voting record, her articles, etc. So having her exclude somebody from the West Coast on her top-12 list is just par for the course.

    ZagDad

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    Well in spite of herself Voepel included 3 players from the Oregon schools out of her 12 selected. Ionescu she pretty much had to put at the top if she wanted anybody to take the article even halfway seriously.

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