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Thread: Tennessee coaching position open

  1. #1

    Default Tennessee coaching position open

    With Oregon State having a 50 million dollar athletic department debt out of control and a new school President coming in that may reign things in athletically I would say Rueck might find the Tennessee job very attractive.



    Coach Fortier is also mentioned in the article. It is only time before her name shows up in other places.

    "Fortier, 37, is one of the top up-and-coming coaches in the country. Kelly Graves built Gonzaga into an elite mid-major, and Fortier kept the train rolling. She's in her fifth season as coach after seven seasons as an assistant for Graves.

    Gonzaga made the NCAA Tournament for the fourth time in Fortier's five seasons. The Bulldogs reached the Sweet 16 in her first season as an 11-seed before falling 73-69 to Tennessee.

    Fortier is a California native who played college basketball in her home state. She has spent her entire coaching career on the West coast."


    The CAL job may be open in a couple of years, fans don't think Coach Gottleib is the answer there with continued under performances year after year. Coach Fortier has been mentioned on CAL websites this past year too.





    https://www.knoxnews.com/story/sport...er/3066070002/

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    I see Rueck in a similar light as Coach Few. It's about a lot more than just money. Corvallis is home to him and his family and he loves it there. I could see him staying put for the rest of his career.

    Biggest rumor so far is about Walz from Louisville.

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    Rueck goes back a lot longer in oregon than just OSU....he was at George Fox for 16 yrs IIRC..

    but money talks ....

    still think they'll go after Kelli at Missouri state...a Tenn player/grad....its not like she had instant success there but they are in the top 16....

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    Whoever it is I hope Coach Fortier and her team stay at GU. They are amazing.

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    From ESPNW:

    Whom will Tennessee hire to replace head coach Holly Warlick?

    Mechelle Voepel
    espnW.com
    4:22 PM PT

    Now that Holly Warlick has been let go, Tennessee will have its first coaching search of the modern era of women's basketball.

    Pat Summitt was hired fresh out of college in 1974, with no fanfare, but went on to win eight NCAA titles and become a sports legend. When she had to leave coaching following the 2011-12 season because of early onset dementia, Alzheimer's type, she was replaced by Warlick, Summitt's longtime assistant and former player.

    Whom will Tennessee hire to replace Warlick? It's a brand-new era for Tennessee, which might mean the school considers hiring a male coach.

    Will the administration look for a coach with any ties to Summitt or someone outside the "Lady Vols family" who has had success elsewhere? Here's a look at nine possible candidates, listed in alphabetical order.

    Michelle Clark-Heard, Cincinnati head coach, age 50
    She's in her first season with the Bearcats, and it is impressive. She went 20-9 overall and 12-4 in the American Athletic Conference with a program that has struggled to be competitive. Cincinnati has defeated Youngstown State and Minnesota in the WNIT and faces Butler on Thursday. She had six successful seasons at Western Kentucky, where she won at least 22 games each year and made four NCAA tournament appearances. Clark-Heard was also a head coach at Kentucky State from 2005 to '07 and was on Jeff Walz's staff as an assistant at Louisville from 2007 to '2012, which included the Cardinals' 2009 trip to the Final Four. When she came to Cincinnati, Clark-Heard signed a six-year deal worth $400,000 in base salary per season.

    Brenda Frese, Maryland head coach, age 48
    She's in her 17th season with the Terps, the No. 3 seed in the Albany Regional who were upset by No. 6 UCLA on Monday. Frese led Maryland to the 2006 NCAA title and the 2014 and '15 Final Fours. Her Maryland team came into the Big Ten in 2014-15 and immediately became the league's best, as the Terps have won or tied for the regular-season title four of the five years they've been in the league. Frese signed a deal in 2013 that carries through at least 2021, with rollover possibilities through 2025. Frese is reported to make $1.19 million per season. She got her 500th career victory in January.

    Gail Goestenkors, age 56
    The former Duke and Texas head coach has been out of college coaching since she resigned from her position with the Longhorns in 2012. But she remains involved with the sport, as a WNBA assistant in Los Angeles and Indiana, as a broadcaster and for the past year as a coaching consultant. Word is that Goestenkors might want to return to the sideline, and her experience at both the college and the pro levels makes her an intriguing candidate. She made Duke a powerhouse, going 396-99 in 15 seasons from 1992 to 2007. Goestenkors had a friendly relationship with Summitt, too, even though she and Duke handed Tennessee one of its most painful losses in the 1999 Elite Eight, when the Lady Vols were going for a four-peat. Goestenkors did not win an NCAA title, but she took Duke to the Final Four on four occasions.

    Kellie Harper, Missouri State head coach, age 41
    She has very strong ties to the Lady Vols, starting at point guard for their national championship teams in 1996, '97 and '98. She is also the only native of Tennessee on this list; her hometown is Sparta. Harper was first a head coach at Western Carolina (2004-2009). She has experience with the difficulties of trying to follow a legend, as she took over at NC State in 2009 after Kay Yow's death. Harper was let go after the 2013 season after she went 70-64 and 23-39 in the ACC, with one NCAA tournament appearance. Harper then went to Missouri State, where she is in her sixth season and making her second NCAA tournament appearance. The Lady Bears won the Missouri Valley tournament title and now are the lowest seed left in the NCAA tournament, as the Chicago Regional's No. 11 seed after upsetting No. 3 Iowa State on Monday. Harper is signed through April 2021 with a base salary of $246,640 per year.

    Niele Ivey, Notre Dame assistant coach, age 41
    She's one of the top assistants in the game for one of the top programs, and her name has come up in head-coaching searches for years. Might this be the year she decides to move up? Ivey is in her 12th season at her alma mater, having won a national championship with the Irish as a player in 2001 and as an assistant last season. She's known as not just one of the top recruiters in the country but also one of the best guard mentors for players such as WNBA stars Skylar Diggins-Smith and Jewell Loyd, plus current Notre Dame standouts Arike Ogunbowale and Jackie Young. Tennessee might not be willing to hand the reins to someone who hasn't been a head coach, but if it considers an assistant, Ivey should be at the top of the list.

    Felisha Legette-Jack, Buffalo head coach, age 52
    Legette-Jack is in her seventh season at Buffalo, and she led the Bulls to the Sweet 16 last year. They also gave UConn a run for its money in the NCAA second round this season. The Bulls have gone to the NCAA tournament three times under Legette-Jack, who was a head coach at Hofstra for four seasons and at Indiana for six. Legette-Jack is a Syracuse native and has seemed happy in her home state of New York, but Tennessee could probably lure anyone. She signed a five-year contract in May 2018 with an annual salary of $240,000 per year.

    Wes Moore, NC State head coach, age 61
    He's well known to Lady Vols fans, having coached at Maryville College in Tennessee from 1987 to '93 and at Chattanooga from 1998 to 2013. Chattanooga was a perennial Southern Conference power under Moore, making eight NCAA tournament appearances. He's currently in his sixth season at NC State, and the Wolfpack, the Greensboro Regional's No. 3 seed, are in the Sweet 16, despite losing four players to knee injuries this season. He's the oldest of these candidates, but his success speaks for itself, and his longtime ties to the state of Tennessee could be a benefit. Moore also makes much less than fellow candidates Jeff Walz, Vic Schaefer and Frese; he's signed through 2020 at $460,000 annually.

    Vic Schaefer, Mississippi State head coach, age 58
    He has had remarkable success in seven years in Starkville, reaching the past two national championship games and being the No. 1 seed in the Portland Regional this year. His team won the SEC regular-season title the past two years and the SEC tournament title -- for the first time in program history -- this year. Like Walz, Schaefer has not won an NCAA title as a head coach but has as an assistant with Texas A&M in 2012. Schaefer signed a contract extension last summer for four years with an average salary of $1,596,000 per year. From Tennessee's standpoint, to be frank, hiring Schaefer would mean getting a top coach for the Lady Vols while taking one from one of the SEC rivals.

    Jeff Walz, Louisville head coach, age 47
    He has taken the Cardinals to three Final Fours, and they're a No. 1 seed in the Albany Regional this year. He hasn't won an NCAA title as a head coach but did as an assistant with Maryland in 2006. Walz, in his 12th season at Louisville, had his contract extended last June through 2025, so he would come with a contract buyout. Beyond that, he's already making considerably more than Warlick ($1.475 million to $690,000), so he'll cost more, too. He has connected well with Louisville fans. Could he do the same trying to follow Summitt in the hearts and minds of the Tennessee faithful? Some believe him to be the leading candidate to succeed Warlick.

    Other thoughts
    Could Tennessee look outside of college coaching? Two names that will be brought up are NBA assistant Becky Hammon and broadcaster Kara Lawson, both former WNBA players.

    Hammon, an assistant coach for the San Antonio Spurs, has never coached at the college level and appears to be on track for a possible NBA head-coaching job, which would be a historic breakthrough for women coaches. It's hard to see her giving up that possibility for Tennessee, a place to which she has no ties.

    Lawson is beloved by the fan base and is known for her keen eye for strategy as a former Tennessee point guard. She's very involved with her alma mater but has not coached before. Would Tennessee choose her, if she were interested, over people with many years of experience coaching and recruiting?
    Article Link: http://www.espn.com/womens-college-b...3629/undefined

    ZagDad

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    what's interesting and refreshing is that there is actual national interest with media coverage for a WOMEN'S college coaching search.....its a great sport and I think national interest is growing....all good.....

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    What is interesting to me is the huge disparity in salaries of head coaches in the P-5 conferences in the Tennessee list:

    P-5 Conference Coaches
    Vic Schaefer, Mississippi State head coach, age 58 - Salary = $1,596,000 per year (SEC).
    Jeff Walz, Louisville head coach, age 47 - Salary = $1,475,000 per year (ACC).
    Brenda Frese, Maryland head coach, age 48 - Salary = $1,190,000 per year (Big-10).
    Wes Moore, NC State head coach, age 61 - Salary = $460,000 per year (ACC).
    Holly Warlick, Tennessee former head coach - Salary = $690,000 per year (SEC).

    Mid-Major Coaches
    Michelle Clark-Heard, Cincinnati head coach, age 50 - Salary = $400,000 per year (AAC).
    Felisha Legette-Jack, Buffalo head coach, age 52 - $240,000 per year.
    Kellie Harper, Missouri State head coach, age 41 - $246,640 per year.

    One thing is very obvious is that Wes Moore is greatly underpaid. Two, if Tennessee wants to bring in an experienced, big name coach they are going to have to double Warlick's current salary.

    By looking at the disparity between Wbb P-5 conference head coach salaries and Wbb mid-major head coach salaries, you can be relatively safe to assume that KG got a pay raise somewhere in the range of double to quadruple by moving to the Ducks from Gonzaga.

    ZagDad

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    The MVP of the McDonalds All American Wbb game tonight, Jordan Horston is a Tennessee recruit. She apparently learned of the dismissal of Holly Warlick while she was on the bench at the McDonald's All American Game on Wednesday in Atlanta.

    Horston said she needed time to digest the news. The 6-foot-1 guard from Ohio's Columbus Africentric signed with the Lady Vols in November and led her team to its second straight state title earlier this month.

    "I love Tennessee, and I love Holly," she said. "I guess I'll have to sleep on this whole situation. I really don't want to talk about it."

    ZagDad

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    its Kelli Harper........congratulations......

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    From ESPN:

    Harper returns to Lady Vols, replaces Warlick
    Mechelle Voepel
    espnW.com
    2:25 PM PT

    Former Vols player Kellie Harper has been named the next women's basketball coach at Tennessee, replacing Holly Warlick, the school announced Tuesday.
    Harper agreed to a five-year deal worth $750,000 annually.

    "I am incredibly humbled and honored to be named the head coach of the Tennessee Lady Vols," Harper said. "Tennessee holds a special place in my heart, and I am excited to embrace the legacy of this proud program. I can't wait to help each player and this team be champions, on the court and off."

    Harper had been coaching Missouri State, leading the Lady Bears to the NCAA Sweet 16 this past season.

    Harper, a native of Sparta, Tennessee, was Kellie Jolly when she helped lead the Lady Vols to NCAA titles in 1996, '97 and '98 as a point guard. She finished her Tennessee playing career in 1999, and she began her coaching career in 2000 as an assistant at Auburn and then Chattanooga. She became head coach at Western Carolina in 2004, then moved to NC State in 2009 to replace the late Kay Yow.

    Harper was let go by NC State in 2013, and then went to Missouri State. She has taken the Lady Bears to the NCAA tournament twice, including this season's run to the regional semifinals as a No. 11 seed. Missouri State beat No. 6 DePaul and No. 3 Iowa State, the latter on the Cyclones' home floor.

    Harper's career record as a head coach is 285-208; she was 118-79 in six seasons at Missouri State.

    "I'm excited to have Kellie as our new women's basketball coach," Tennessee athletic director Phillip Fulmer said. "She is a Lady Vol through and through. Her love of the game, her care and love for her players, and her loyalty to UT all came through during the interview process. "Kellie has proven to be a winner at every stop in her career, taking three programs to the NCAA tournament. She certainly knows the expectations that come with this job, as she has lived it herself."

    Warlick was fired last month by Tennessee after seven seasons.

    Harper was on the Lady Vols' roster as a player when Warlick was an assistant to Pat Summitt. Warlick took over as head coach for the 2012-13 season after Summitt stepped down in the spring of 2012 because of the effects of early-onset dementia, Alzheimer's type. Summitt died in 2016.

    Warlick was 172-67 in seven seasons as head coach at Tennessee. This season, the Lady Vols were 19-13 and lost in the first round of the NCAA tournament to UCLA.
    Article Link: http://www.espn.com/womens-college-b...places-warlick

    I am a little surprised at the hire only because Kellie Harper has been a head coach at three (3) different colleges; Western Carolina for 5 years with a 97-65 record (0.599) overall and a 63-32 record (0.660) in the Southern Conference, followed by 4 years at NC State resulting in an overall record of 70-64 (0.522) and a record in the ACC of 23-39 (0.442) and an annual record in the ACC of 7-7, 4-10, 5-11, & 7-11. After being let go by NC State Harper was hired by Missouri State where she coached the last 6 years accumulating an overall record of 118-79 (0.599) and a MVC record of 78-30 (0.722).

    Holly Warlick was fired from Tennessee for accumulating a record of 172-67 (0.722) which is considerably better than the record achieved by Harper at any of her previous locations and considerably better than he record she achieved at NC State (0.522), the only other P-5 conference head coaching job she has had. I wish Kellie the best of luck, but she is going to have to perform much better than she has at any of her previous coaching spots if she wants to maintain the HC position at Tennessee.

    Harper's reported salary at Tennessee is $750,000 per year, a significant raise from her $246,000 she earned at Missouri State However, it is considerably less than the other premier P-5 universities are paying their Wbb coaches.

    Let's hope the old adage of "You get what you pay for" does not apply to Kellie Harper.

    ZagDad

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    Some good news for Kellie Harper - from ESPN:

    2019 recruits reaffirm commitment to Lady Vols
    Walter Villa - Special to espnW
    7:16 PM PT

    All three players in Tennessee's 2019 recruiting class -- Jordan Horston, Tamari Key and Emily Saunders -- reaffirmed their commitment to the Lady Vols and new coach Kellie Harper on Tuesday.

    Harper agreed to a five-year deal worth $750,000 annually, the school announced Tuesday. The former Lady Vols player replaces Holly Warlick, who was fired last month.

    Horston, a 6-foot-1 senior at Africentric (Columbus, Ohio) and the No. 2 prospect in the espnW HoopGurlz Top 100, said Harper contacted her mother and promised to visit Horston and her family on Thursday.

    "I don't know [Harper] yet, but I'm excited to meet her," Horston said. "Tennessee is not going to pick the wrong person as coach. I'm ready to go in there with open ears. I want to turn the program around."

    Horston learned the news of Warlick's firing on March 27 as she was about to take the court for the McDonald's All American Game. Horston was named MVP of the game; she declined to comment on her future at the postgame news conference.

    "There were a lot of mixed emotions," Horston said. "I was kind of upset but also excited about what's next. I want to win."

    Harper, a native of Sparta, Tennessee, went by Kellie Jolly when she helped the Lady Vols to NCAA titles in 1996, 1997 and 1998 as a point guard.

    "She was a point guard, and I'm a point guard," Horston said of Harper. "She has the blueprint. She's going to push me to be a great player.

    "I believe she still has that 'Lady Vol' in her, and she's not going to let this program down."

    Harper began her coaching career in 2000 as an Auburn assistant. This season, as head coach at 11th-seeded Missouri State, she led her team to upsets over No. 6 DePaul and No. 3 Iowa State.

    Horston said she keeps in contact with most of the Tennessee players -- especially Zaay Green and Jazmine Massengill -- and they have indicated to her that the program is on the right track.

    "I know the girls on the team now want to work hard," Horston said. "They don't want to lose. They are gym rats. They want to redeem themselves."

    Saunders, the 2019 West Virginia Gatorade Player of the Year, said playing for Tennessee will be the culmination of a dream that has been years in the making. As a freshman, she led Wyoming County East (New Richmond, West Virginia) to a state title. Three months later, her maternal grandfather, Gary Shrewsbury, died at the age of 68 due to cardiac arrest. Saunders used to go to her grandparents' house for dinner every Sunday after church. On many of those Sundays, she would watch the Lady Vols with her grandfather and the rest of the family.

    "I wanted to make him proud," Saunders said. "If he were here today, knowing that I'm a Tennessee recruit, he would be proud and happy."

    Given that personal history, Saunders was not deterred by the coaching change.

    Saunders said it was "upsetting" and "very sad" when Warlick was dismissed. But she was thrilled when she found out Harper had been hired.

    "I love that it's staying in the Vols family," Saunders said. "We're keeping the tradition alive. "Transferring never occurred to me. Tennessee has been my dream school since I was 8 years old. I grew up watching Candace Parker and Tamika Catchings."

    Key, a senior at Cary (North Carolina) and the No. 46 prospect in the Top 100, she said she committed to Tennessee for the school and not only for a particular coach. "I wasn't happy to see Holly go," Key said. "I heard a lot of talk on social media during the season, but I didn't think Holly was going to get released until it actually happened. "It surprised me. But ... I want the program to get back on track. I have never had any doubts about wanting to attend Tennessee."

    Key said she woke up Tuesday morning with a mountain of text messages from friends and coaches, all telling her that Harper was headed to Tennessee.
    Harper called Key's mother, and the two are working on a time when the coach can visit the family.

    "I want to meet her," Key said. "I want to talk to her. I'm looking forward to getting to know her. I'm moving in at Tennessee at the end of May. I'm excited."
    Article Link: http://www.espn.com/womens-college-b...ment-lady-vols

    ZagDad

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    Harper has a high energy persona and is a players coach.....it may be that she has not been able to garner the top recruits and maybe now she will.....I feel bad for Missouri state... maybe Jackie stiles will get the head coaching position now...she's been an assistant at LMU and Missouri state for several yrs now........hope Kellie does well.....

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    Seems like an underwhelming hire to me. Nikki Fargas from LSU was also a candidate. I think they put way too much emphasis on having ties to the Tennessee program and not nearly enough on getting the best coach possible. But we'll see.

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    Some more info on Kellie Harper and her hire at Tennessee. Many of the same points we have pointed out on this thread. From ESPN:

    Kellie Harper returns home to coach Tennessee
    Mechelle Voepel
    espnW.com
    6:53 PM PT

    Kellie Harper takes over a Tennessee women's basketball program that has been surrounded of late by bittersweet nostalgia, clear-eyed pragmatism and frustrated pessimism. But there's also a lot of hopeful optimism in Lady Vols nation. Harper will have to navigate all of that.

    Harper, the Tennessee native and former Lady Vols player, "came home" on Wednesday, and for those in support of her replacing Holly Warlick, this is an especially happy day. For those who think Tennessee should have aimed higher -- getting a coach who already has had success at a Power 5 school -- this is a time of trepidation.

    Was Harper, who spent the past six seasons at Missouri State, the right hire? Only time will tell. But there are good points to be made in support of Harper.
    Some might say that with her coaching résumé, which includes four years at NC State following the legendary Kay Yow, Harper wouldn't have gotten this job if she weren't a former Tennessee player. And that's true. But that doesn't mean she isn't the right choice.

    Women's basketball history matters at Tennessee -- probably more than it does at any school in the United States -- because the timeline of the Lady Vols' influence is so expansive. By the same token, the past can't overshadow the present or the future. If Harper does this right, all three can coexist.

    "I can look right out this door and see a statue over there. That was not lost on me," Harper said Wednesday at a news conference in Knoxville, Tennessee, referencing the likeness of Pat Summitt that stands just outside Thompson-Boling Arena. "I hope that Pat Summitt is smiling down today. I think about her often. I'm not here to try to be Pat Summitt. I'm here to be Kellie, who learned from Pat Summitt."

    Harper was at the pinnacle of her playing career two decades ago, when Summitt and her Lady Vols were the most powerful program in women's basketball.
    Harper -- then Kellie Jolly -- was the point guard for the national champions in 1998, as Tennessee went 38-0 and won its third NCAA title in a row and sixth overall. No other program at that time had more than two NCAA championships; UConn had one. Harper knows what it's like to be the best.

    Detractors, though, are worried that Harper might be too much an extension of Warlick and what didn't work as well as hoped during her seven years as head coach after 29 as an assistant. They're concerned that Tennessee stayed too insular with this choice, that athletic director Phillip Fulmer put too much emphasis on that. And there's no doubt that he made it paramount.

    "It was essential, I think," Fulmer said when asked about Harper's Tennessee pedigree. "It became clear to me as the interview process started that we had our choice of coaches to talk to. As we went through the process, it became clear that a Lady Vol would be really great. And Kellie knocked it out of the park."

    That's the easy part for Harper: talking about her unquestioned love for Tennessee and the things she learned playing for Summitt. The hard part is that it's a changed women's basketball world from Harper's playing days, when Tennessee was so dominant in the SEC and the country.

    It's the greatest thing to be on top -- until you're not anymore and the fall has left you bruised and uncertain. For Tennessee, some degree of this fall back to the pack was inevitable. All the work Summitt did promoting and growing the game was eventually going to lead to a time when Tennessee would be regularly challenged and sometimes overtaken.

    Summitt understood that because she had such a sense of the big picture. That had already started to happen in 1998. Summitt's willingness to play anyone anywhere had elevated other programs, Duke among them, and the Blue Devils ended Tennessee's chance to "four-peat" in 1999, Harper's senior year, by beating the Lady Vols in the Elite Eight.
    Still, Tennessee was an acceptable version of "Tennessee" for nearly another decade, winning two national championships and making five other Final Fours between 2000 and 2008.

    After losing five seniors, including Candace Parker, from the 2008 championship team, however, Tennessee lost in the NCAA tournament's first round for the first time in 2009 against Ball State. But the Lady Vols were back knocking on the door of a Final Four by 2011, when they lost in the Elite Eight. Later that year, Summitt got the diagnosis of early-onset dementia, Alzheimer's type, and things would never be the same at Tennessee.

    Summit stepped down in the spring of 2012, and Warlick took over, but it always seemed like Warlick was being judged against an impossible standard. And then, to be frank, even when the standard was realistic, Tennessee began to have trouble measuring up to that, too.

    It wasn't just that the Lady Vols lost in the NCAA tournament's early rounds the past three years. It was the losses in home games to opponents that Tennessee fans were used to owning for decades. It was a perceived lack of consistent effort from the players. It was that the Lady Vols no longer looked like the Lady Vols.

    This season, Tennessee lost to Vanderbilt at home for the first time in a year when the Commodores were the worst team in the SEC. Then the Lady Vols fell in the first round of the NCAA tournament. That was juxtaposed with Harper's No. 11 seed Missouri State team looking gritty and inspirational while getting two upsets to make the Sweet 16. It was time for a change, and the timing for Harper -- with a team making a run in March Madness -- couldn't have been more fortuitous.

    On Wednesday, Harper said there were a lot of oh-wow-this-is-real moments, but none more so than when she saw her two young children dressed in Tennessee gear. She can show them photos of herself winning national championships, wearing Tennessee orange, being a part of something so big. Now she's part of it in a different way.

    Are the expectations huge? You bet. Will there be those fans who immediately pounce on any loss as proof that this was the wrong hire? Of course. But you can sense just how much Lady Vols fandom wants this to work.

    Yes, Warlick was one of their own, and it wasn't enough. Harper clearly knows that. She's well aware that she will have to produce.
    But she can take assurance that this is something Summitt would have wanted. On Wednesday, Harper said that back when she was a player, Summitt told her that one day she might be the coach at Tennessee. In Harper's mind then, that was impossible.

    "I thought that was Pat Summitt's job forever," Harper said. "When this opportunity came available ... this is my dream job."
    Article Link: http://www.espn.com/womens-college-b...oach-tennessee

    ZagDad

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