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Thread: Weird Stuff You Find Fascinating

  1. #1
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    Default Weird Stuff You Find Fascinating

    I was going to make this about "weird videos" on YouTube that you find fascinating, or something like that. Then, I thought, "why limit it to YouTube?" And then I thought, why limit it to the net?

    But, the roots of this are two things I find fascinating that NO ONE else does. I do them only when I'm alone.


    1. I have this weird thing about loving videos of landing in exotic foreign cities, like Bangkok, or Quito. Places that I will never in a million years go.


    For instance, here's a perfectly useless - and, to me, utterly fascinating - video of landing in St. John's New Foundland. Why St. Johns? Why not? I'll never go!





    2. Kinda similar, you know on Google Maps? You know the "Street View"? I like to just find random remote places and "drive for a bit." When I say remote, take this example. IF you look on Norway, there's a highway that literally goes to the very northernmost coast on the arctic ocean. You can actually take street view to the edge of that highway, with nothing but the Arctic ocean staring at you.

    I showed my dad once. His words: "This does nothing for me, you know?"

    Well, I liked it. Have at it, here's the view of the parking lot on the arctic ocean at a weather station at the northernmost point of Norway:https://www.google.com/maps/@71.1694...7i13312!8i6656

    What utterly useless sht do you find fascinating?
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

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    Nice thread!

    My stuff is all design and art related. I sleep, eat and breathe this stuff now. So awesome.

    For straight up, raw, good design advice, you'd be hard pressed to beat GFDA - Good F*cking Design Advice. You can request as much advice as you need, just hit the, "This isn’t enough, I need more f*cking advice" link, lower left side.

    Arguably the greatest living type designer, Matthew Carter, deserves a minute of your time. Lord knows you've read his work your entire life.

    And Vic Lee! Oh my goodness. He walks up to a wall (or random surface) and unleashes an improv masterpiece with a handful of markers. Unreal. Please look at his murals.

    Finally, Hilma af Klint (1862-1944). If you know her, good on you. The Swedish painter only made her debut in 1985, and only saw her first solo exhibition in 1986 -- and yet she almost single handedly invented modern art, preceding Kandinsky and Mondrian among others. I only recently discovered her and have been completely blown away by her work. Hilma af Klint is currently showing at the Guggenheim.
    Once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right

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    Dixie... Gander Field is where the former lawyer.... successful author..... Grisham.... has to refuel his Gulfstream when he is off on a holiday to Europa !!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by bartruff1 View Post
    Dixie... Gander Field is where the former lawyer.... successful author..... Grisham.... has to refuel his Gulfstream when he is off on a holiday to Europa !!!
    Can I just tell you that I am nerdy enough to know that Gander Fiield isn't actually in St. Johns and isn't the modern St. John's airport?

    Gander Field is the Royal Canadian Air Force Base that I believe is 20 miles inland on the island, (closer to the middle of the island) and is the airport famous as the stop over for fuel between NYC and London or Paris back when fuel was a huge problem. The St. John's modern airport is not the "Gander" where they always refueled. The informal name for the St. John's airport is "Touro 'Bay"
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

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    Whoops....thanks......I know better than to assume...but I still do...

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheZagPhish View Post
    Nice thread!

    My stuff is all design and art related. I sleep, eat and breathe this stuff now. So awesome.

    For straight up, raw, good design advice, you'd be hard pressed to beat GFDA - Good F*cking Design Advice. You can request as much advice as you need, just hit the, "This isn’t enough, I need more f*cking advice" link, lower left side.

    Arguably the greatest living type designer, Matthew Carter, deserves a minute of your time. Lord knows you've read his work your entire life.

    And Vic Lee! Oh my goodness. He walks up to a wall (or random surface) and unleashes an improv masterpiece with a handful of markers. Unreal. Please look at his murals.

    Finally, Hilma af Klint (1862-1944). If you know her, good on you. The Swedish painter only made her debut in 1985, and only saw her first solo exhibition in 1986 -- and yet she almost single handedly invented modern art, preceding Kandinsky and Mondrian among others. I only recently discovered her and have been completely blown away by her work. Hilma af Klint is currently showing at the Guggenheim.
    I loved the TED talk you posted from Carter.

    The entire world of font design lived and worked totally unbeknownst to me - at all - until I was in my early 30s and read a New Yorker article on the contract Delta had with some designers for the font design of the "Delta" on their new logo on their aircraft.

    I was fascinated that so much could go into designing 5 letters, but also that an entire industry/field existed that I never knew or questioned.

    From that point, I have noticed the changes in feel to things. Unfortunately, 90% of what I write must be in certain fonts, arial, Times, or Ca
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bartruff1 View Post
    Whoops....thanks......I know better than to assume...but I still do...
    No, it's me, and me being just weirdly obsessed about anything to do with an airplane. I loved airplanes since I was four. Read everything I could that related to them.

    To this day, I know that to be an adult and be cool, one is supposed to say he/she hates commercial flying, hates airports, blah blah I love every single aspect of it even though I've flown as often as the usual American adult, at least 3-4x a year.

    I still love every single thing except the line in security. Still think of it almost like when I was a kid. I like the airports, I like boarding, I like looking out the window, watching the flaps respond to changes in pressure, everything.

    I try to remember that every generation going back 10,000 years dreamed about what it would be like to fly. I am one of the first 3-4 generations to experience it. So, I try to enjoy it. I think people who don't look out the window the whole time are losing a valuable opportunity.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

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    Bonsai …...I tend to be a very left brained person but I was stunned by the beauty of the Weyerhaeuser Collection at their site near the intersection of Highways 18 and I 5......so I now have a small collection...

    If tiny trees are not weird enough....how about tiny towns …..the amazing photography of Elgin Park PA. by Michael Paul Smith...
    Last edited by bartruff1; 03-05-2019 at 08:00 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DixieZag View Post
    2. Kinda similar, you know on Google Maps? You know the "Street View"? I like to just find random remote places and "drive for a bit." When I say remote, take this example. IF you look on Norway, there's a highway that literally goes to the very northernmost coast on the arctic ocean. You can actually take street view to the edge of that highway, with nothing but the Arctic ocean staring at you.

    I showed my dad once. His words: "This does nothing for me, you know?"

    Well, I liked it. Have at it, here's the view of the parking lot on the arctic ocean at a weather station at the northernmost point of Norway:https://www.google.com/maps/@71.1694...7i13312!8i6656

    What utterly useless sht do you find fascinating?
    There's a game online, I think I might have posted the link on the foo years ago, but basically they show you a street view picture and you're supposed to pinpoint where it is using context clues.


    I need to think about weird things I enjoy... because I don't always think of them as weird since I enjoy them haha.

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    Dixie--it's not related to airplanes, but several of Farley Mowat's books are about sailing all around Newfoundland. I find it a fascinating place. At the time of Mowat's writings it was still fiercely independent despite becoming part of Canada several decades previously. A quick look at wikipedia seems to indicate that hasn't changed much several decades later. "The Boat Who Wouldn't Float" is a hilarious, entertaining and informative read.

    Sounds like you've got some wanderlust. Maybe you should take a trip to one of those edge of the world places, just to see it for yourself.

  11. #11
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    I care about Track and Field Minutiae. Specifically distance running times for road, cross country and track racing. I follow high school, college and professional results.

    I know the history, the present and because I follow the high school results, the potential future of the sport.

    I follow Gonzaga Cross Country and Track the closest of all. I know most of the athletes personal bests, how they are currently running and speculate in my head about how they will do this season and down the road.

    I also follow www.letsruns.com almost as religiously as I do this site.

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    This thread has me realizing all the weird things I do....if you are retired and have sufficient health and wealth and time and energy and curiosity there are a unlimited number of interesting things to do...

    I am fascinated by the Cascade Mountains....the geology, the history and most of all by the wildlife.....I spent some time in research at the Forestry Lab......so I know that wildlife researchers are always in need of help....simple things like data collection, setting and maintaining cameras....all kids of chores..... and I am in the forests 12 months of the year ….." helping"..... if you can walk you can snowshoe...

    To be clear I am not a biologist of any kind, the only academic exposure I had was a course in organic chemistry.....now how hard could that be ??? Just a additional carbon particle right ? Wrong, the chemistry of living things is extremely complicated....I had to get a withdraw passing....

    The apex predators get all the publics attention and we have them....but two of the weird things I have been involved in are the reintroduction of Western Painted Turtles about 10 years ago....that research continues in cooperation with the Seattle Zoo ….

    And a study by MIT of the Pika populations in the Mt Stuart Batholith..... apparently Pika are a canary of climate change as they are isolated and very sensitive to temps above 65 degrees …….so I go find them and document their location and measure stuff and count stuff and collect poop.....great fun...

    I have no involvement.... but the migration and repopulation of Mountain Goats from the Goat Rocks to Mt St Helens is of great interest...

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    Hey Bart! I see dire warnings about crashing pika populations. It's only anecdotal, but I've been seeing and hearing them consistently in recent years. Even at elevations way lower than you would expect to find, them, like below 4,000' probably even below 3,000' on a few occasions.

    I'm also very interested in mountain goat sightings in various parts of the Cascades. Again anecdotal, but 20 or so years ago I saw NONE on any of the Mountain Loop Hwy area hikes. I've been seeing them there semi-regularly in recent years. And that was before the recent relocation of a bunch of Olympic National Park goats.

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    Quote Originally Posted by seacatfan View Post
    Dixie--it's not related to airplanes, but several of Farley Mowat's books are about sailing all around Newfoundland. I find it a fascinating place. At the time of Mowat's writings it was still fiercely independent despite becoming part of Canada several decades previously. A quick look at wikipedia seems to indicate that hasn't changed much several decades later. "The Boat Who Wouldn't Float" is a hilarious, entertaining and informative read.

    Sounds like you've got some wanderlust. Maybe you should take a trip to one of those edge of the world places, just to see it for yourself.
    I do have some of that, and that's great advice. I do like exploring areas off the beaten path.

    I've also got a bit of the "mystic" in me, joy in the lifelong pursuit of learning. I can't really imagine life not having an hour or two before bed of just "finding stuff out" - nothing too "irrelevant."

    It helped me get a huge client once. I had read an article 2 weeks prior on cancer research focused on stopping the vascular growth into tumors, thus drying up the cancer. Turned out this guy was a major angel fund investor in a company focused on that stuff. The fact that I had read into it before seemed to give him confidence that I was smart enough to deal with his stuff. Not sure if that was true or not, I just know it helped me get that guy, which helped everything.

    I can be insufferable in talking about stuff I learned. Many interpret it as me attempting to express how I'm smarter than so and so. Actually, it's me being arrogant in thinking that something I just read and found interesting would obviously interest them, when that's just dumb.

    I love the idea of reading those books. I love that my favorite dogs come from that area. The "Newfoundland" is formerly what the fisherman called "the big water dog" and the "Labrador" (being the smaller island) became the name for the "small water dog" - as both breeds got their start retrieving the fish net floaters. That's why they're such strong swimmers, and big coats. I think those books would be fascinating. Thank you very much for recommending them. I'd never heard of him.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bartruff1 View Post
    This thread has me realizing all the weird things I do....if you are retired and have sufficient health and wealth and time and energy and curiosity there are a unlimited number of interesting things to do...

    I am fascinated by the Cascade Mountains....the geology, the history and most of all by the wildlife.....I spent some time in research at the Forestry Lab......so I know that wildlife researchers are always in need of help....simple things like data collection, setting and maintaining cameras....all kids of chores..... and I am in the forests 12 months of the year ….." helping"..... if you can walk you can snowshoe...

    To be clear I am not a biologist of any kind, the only academic exposure I had was a course in organic chemistry.....now how hard could that be ??? Just a additional carbon particle right ? Wrong, the chemistry of living things is extremely complicated....I had to get a withdraw passing....

    The apex predators get all the publics attention and we have them....but two of the weird things I have been involved in are the reintroduction of Western Painted Turtles about 10 years ago....that research continues in cooperation with the Seattle Zoo ….

    And a study by MIT of the Pika populations in the Mt Stuart Batholith..... apparently Pika are a canary of climate change as they are isolated and very sensitive to temps above 65 degrees …….so I go find them and document their location and measure stuff and count stuff and collect poop.....great fun...

    I have no involvement.... but the migration and repopulation of Mountain Goats from the Goat Rocks to Mt St Helens is of great interest...
    Not one word of that seems weird to me.

    But I love that you do it, and would love to do similar things myself.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

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