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Thread: Pepperdine Burning?

  1. #1
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    Default Pepperdine Burning?

    Just saw a picture straight out of a Sci-Fi Horror movie. A massive wall of smoke and fire barreling toward Malibu. Cars jamming the PCH to get out.

    You gotta wonder if Pepperdine is in peril if this thing keeps coming.
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  2. #2
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    ..hit hard and fast

    Pepperdine Malibu and Calabasas campuses have evacuated
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    Wow, right on the heels of that shooting in Thousand Oaks that involved some Pepperdine students. A lot for that community to deal with all at once.

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    From a piece published at 5:16 pm: http://www.laist.com/2018/11/09/here...a_counties.php

    Pepperdine University's Malibu campus was under a shelter-in-place order. Staff and students who were on campus Friday morning were ordered to relocate to the Tyler Campus Center or the Firestone Fieldhouse.

    Hope, a Pepperdine sophomore, told KPCC/LAist that she evacuated Friday afternoon. It took her nearly two hours to get from the campus to a gas station at Pacific Coast Highway and Sunset, just 9 miles away.

    "I'm scared for the students that are still on campus, because a group of them haven't left," Hope said. "I'm scared for just the Malibu community."

    Among those at the student center were a handful of student journalists with the school paper, who set up a makeshift newsroom in a hallway.

    Madeleine Carr, the 20-year-old news editor of the Pepperdine Graphic, said students are still coping with everything that's happened over the past few days, but spirits have been pretty high.

    "We have a piano in our cafeteria where most kids are, and someone from the music department is on the piano playing music and people are doing like a massive sing-a-long or they're playing board games. So you're just seeing students be kids almost," Carr said.

    It was unclear when those students would be allowed to leave.

  5. #5
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    just watched live local report...Pepperdine Campus is surrounded by fire..
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    Pepperdine Campus had a car fire and group of Bikes burn...no buildings reported so far.
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    My God comfort and keep them safe.

    I would like to see the brother schools do something after everything settles down, help them out.
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    There must be a reason, but I do not understand why so many lives are lost in these California fires....yes fires are dangerous and a half dozen lives have been lost in the Northwest....they were fire fighters...to my knowledge no civilian lives have been lost...

    The people responsible for fire control in California must know the fuels, the weather , the topography , the rates of spread and intensity....the risk...the escape routes and the time it takes to evacuate those that need assistance.. ….

    In Washington there are 3 levels of evacuation orders....level 3 is prepare to leave.....2nd is advised to leave....and level 1, ordered to leave.

    Now, I am a old firefighter and I live in the forest and I know that my home will burn down....not if.....but when...

    I leave when the first embers start falling because if they are falling at my house they are also falling down my escape route...

    Wind (red flag days) can spread fire starting embers more than a mile....recently fires have jumped the Columba River and Lake Chelan for example …..

    let the f'ing house burn and get the hell out with your animals before the traffic prevents you from getting out...

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    For the record 5 died trying to get the hell out. Camp fire moved so fast people literally didn’t have enough time
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    Quote Originally Posted by LongIslandZagFan View Post
    For the record 5 died trying to get the hell out. Camp fire moved so fast people literally didn’t have enough time
    My point is there is enough time...if you leave when the fires is far enough away....it has been burning for days maybe longer...the winds have been blowing for days.....I would have got the hell out days ago...for the record...

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    Quote Originally Posted by bartruff1 View Post
    My point is there is always enough time...if you leave when the fires is far enough away....it has been burning for days maybe longer...I would have got the hell out days ago...for the record...
    Darwin has yet to find you.....but eventually it finds us all.....or we die from a heart attack when GU finally hits a buzzer beater to win the national championship and you literally die happy. At least that's how I imagined it once.
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    https://ktla.com/2018/11/10/pepperdi...ibu-evacuated/

    I don’t understand the original decision to have students shelter in place.
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    There was no exit route for those that were still on campus. 101 and Pacific Hwy were closed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bartruff1 View Post
    My point is there is enough time...if you leave when the fires is far enough away....it has been burning for days maybe longer...the winds have been blowing for days.....I would have got the hell out days ago...for the record...
    i’ve lived In Southern Cal for over 30 years....this fire came fast and moved fast.

    Malibu area fire (Woolsey)started Thursday afternoon. We have @ least 2 other fires in the same area in So Cal. Calabasas & West Hills.

    The density and canyons are wicked dangerous for escaping fast on short notice.

    most times I would agree with ya....not this fire not this time.

    Pepperdine has green belt around campus good concrete buildings so was easy call to stay put.
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    Quote Originally Posted by LongIslandZagFan View Post
    For the record 5 died trying to get the hell out. Camp fire moved so fast people literally didn’t have enough time
    crazy to see desert scrub burn so hot and move so fast burning up parked cars in seconds and engulfing 10k sq ft homes in minutes causing roofs to collapse. Winds acting just like blowtorch. These are tile roof stucco homes that embers find the vents and just explode in minutes.
    Dissent, insight and contextual discussion makes a website 'sticky' and engaging - not just predictable, safe position fanboyism. Monoculture is uninteresting and lacks intellectual depth.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bartruff1 View Post
    There must be a reason, but I do not understand why so many lives are lost in these California fires....yes fires are dangerous and a half dozen lives have been lost in the Northwest....they were fire fighters...to my knowledge no civilian lives have been lost...

    The people responsible for fire control in California must know the fuels, the weather , the topography , the rates of spread and intensity....the risk...the escape routes and the time it takes to evacuate those that need assistance.. ….

    In Washington there are 3 levels of evacuation orders....level 3 is prepare to leave.....2nd is advised to leave....and level 1, ordered to leave.

    Now, I am a old firefighter and I live in the forest and I know that my home will burn down....not if.....but when...

    I leave when the first embers start falling because if they are falling at my house they are also falling down my escape route...

    Wind (red flag days) can spread fire starting embers more than a mile....recently fires have jumped the Columba River and Lake Chelan for example …..

    let the f'ing house burn and get the hell out with your animals before the traffic prevents you from getting out...
    That N Cal fire was reported to blow up from 10 acres to 10,000 ac(fifteen sq mi) from 6;30 am to noon. That didn't happen in the Northwest 30-40 years ago when I fought fires. No fire tornadoes then. People simply don't have time to get away when the wind's blowing 60 mph.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zagceo View Post
    i’ve lived In Southern Cal for over 30 years....this fire came fast and moved fast.

    Malibu area fire (Woolsey)started Thursday afternoon. We have @ least 2 other fires in the same area in So Cal. Calabasas & West Hills.

    The density and canyons are wicked dangerous for escaping fast on short notice.

    most times I would agree with ya....not this fire not this time.

    Pepperdine has green belt around campus good concrete buildings so was easy call to stay put.
    I flew from San Diego to Sacramento yesterday at 4pm. Once we hit LA, the ENTIRE valley the rest of the way was blanketed in dense, dense smoke from the the 3 fires you mentioned. All of us on the plane were blown away. it was like a thick fog covered the entire valley, from LA to north of Sac, but it was smoke.

    Up here north of Sac right now, south of the Paradise fire about an hour, and it's like dusk outside. This is from the smoke from Socal though, not the Paradise fire north of here an hour away driving but from fires 6-7 hours away driving in SoCal.

    Measured by structures destroyed, things getting worse and worse each year. My aunt lost her home in Santa Rosa last year in what is known as the Tubbs Fire. Check out the below. You can see of the top 10 fires in CA history for structure damage, one occurred in 2015, 3 in 2017, 2 in 2018...trending in a scary direction.

    Last edited by bballbeachbum; 11-10-2018 at 03:51 PM. Reason: stat typo fix

  18. #18
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    We are talking about a lot of things here without any real information.....according to the news article the five people who were lost trying to escape were at the Paradise Fire and the same article describes a a 85 year old women who had the good sense to leave in time....

    " Scrub Brush " is exactly the kind of fuel that can burn and travel fast on red flag days...if you were to look at the area in the Storm King fire in Colorado that killed more than a dozen smoke jumpers or the Prescott Fire in Arizona that killed some 19 highly trained firefighters or the Twisp Fire that burned a suppression crew in their truck....those could all be described as scrub brush areas with very light fuels....

    So obviously a fire can spread so fast that even a highly trained crew cannot escape much less a civilian ... no one could argue other wise...When there is a red flag warning, I leave my home and go to a safe area ...the red flag weather warning is not only for existing fires but for potential fires.

    As For Pepperdine, I recall the buildings to be stucco and with red tiled roofs and with a lot of grassy areas....however a order to shelter in place is the last option...if it fails....the consequences are tragic as they were at the 30 Mile Fire..

    There are no fire proof buildings under extreme circumstances.... steel reinforced concrete structures can fail in a forest fire ...two cold storage concrete buildings were destroyed by a wildland fire in Wenatchee a couple years ago...
    Last edited by bartruff1; 11-10-2018 at 05:12 PM.

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    Northern California hasn't had meaningful rain in 6 months, everything is kindling. Plus, high winds, poor management of dead brush/trees, poor maintenance along power lines... It's a terrible combination.
    I will thank God for the day and the moment I have. - Jimmy V

  20. #20
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    I don't doubt that Web...but like any other natural (or un natural) disaster like a flood or a hurricane or a earthquake or a tsunami or a eruption..... you need to be prepared.... to have a plan..... to monitor the situation...…

    Science in on our side..... the weather reporting is very accurate and most natural hazards can be identified....

    If every year the Snoqualmie floods...is it a flood...there are places where a prudent person would not live....like the hills above Malibu ..

    Any one with a phone, a TV, a computer can be warned in seconds of a threat...

    For the University to overrule the authorities tells me something is wrong....that Incident Commander could not ignore those students, I suspect he had to reallocate his limited resources to protect those individuals and that has consequences for others that he needs to protect......People not evacuating when ordered to.... and when possible.... create risks to many others..

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by bartruff1 View Post
    There must be a reason, but I do not understand why so many lives are lost in these California fires....yes fires are dangerous and a half dozen lives have been lost in the Northwest....they were fire fighters...to my knowledge no civilian lives have been lost...

    The people responsible for fire control in California must know the fuels, the weather , the topography , the rates of spread and intensity....the risk...the escape routes and the time it takes to evacuate those that need assistance.. ….

    In Washington there are 3 levels of evacuation orders....level 3 is prepare to leave.....2nd is advised to leave....and level 1, ordered to leave.

    Now, I am a old firefighter and I live in the forest and I know that my home will burn down....not if.....but when...

    I leave when the first embers start falling because if they are falling at my house they are also falling down my escape route...

    Wind (red flag days) can spread fire starting embers more than a mile....recently fires have jumped the Columba River and Lake Chelan for example …..

    let the f'ing house burn and get the hell out with your animals before the traffic prevents you from getting out...
    Southern California has a lot more people than Eastern Washington. A lot more people living in the 'wild land-urban interface' areas. And the fires literally exploded. The Camp Fire blew up to 18,000 acres in about 7 hours. That is unimaginable. People were waking up to flames roaring down into their neighborhoods. I am sure emergency services were scrambling trying to get fire crews out as quickly as possible while trying to get evac orders out to the priority locations at the same time, while not even knowing what the fire is doing.
    'I found it is the small everyday deeds of ordinary folk that keep the darkness at bay… small acts of kindness and love.'
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  22. #22
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    I understand that....I have friends in the area and they are ok...they said the summer time temps were nearly intolerable....when a fire reaches a kind of critical mass, it is impossible to control it....

    Here in the Northwest the Fall rains come and the Winter snows fall.... and that is what eventually controls those huge Project Fires.

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