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Thread: Foo rules dba the Maths

  1. #1
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    Default Foo rules dba the Maths

    Quote Originally Posted by bartruff1 View Post
    Since there are no rules in Foo, except there are no rules....counting in Binary is so yesterday.....

    The new math is quantum math.... unfortunately for us, the Chinese are investing 10 Billion in a center for the study of Quantum Physics that will disturb everything....

    The US has about a 10 million dollar effort at USC .......and a public that doesn't trust science ......and is about 40th in Math Testing in the world.

    In Washington State only about 25% of 11th Graders meet standards in math... no bueno...
    Totally hear you Bart. My mom was a high school math teacher in the Vancouver, WA area. She retired in 98 and moved out to a small town Klickitat County. She would sub there sometimes, but spent most of her work and volunteer time at the church she attended. She moved back to Vancouver two years ago and took a long term sub job at Ft Vancouver. She was astonished at the inability of the students to handle basic algebraic concepts But how can you teach algebra if they can't multiply or divide. And the most frustrating part is they showed no interest in learning. Despite the fact that very few students knew how to do basic algebra, the scoring rubric the school provided to her (another long story... it was fairly opaque to the teacher, especially one who hadn't used it before) ended up having almost every student pass her class. She was shocked at the change in the last 20 years.

    It's odd... my own sixth grader is with a group of students being fast tracked in math - he'll be taking Algebra 1 for high school credit as a 7th grader (which apparently is not uncommon at least in the Vancouver School District), but then here in the same district high school sophomores are passing Algebra 1 without being able to solve fairly simple equations.

  2. #2
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    Default

    ps - absolutely no problem with anyone posting whatever the f^<k they want to in the binary thread. But my own special kind of AR prevents me from responding there lol

  3. #3
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    fixed it....my kid in Vancouver has a BS in Electrical Engineering and a Minor in Mechanical and was educated [n the Public School System, .....so the opportunities are there for the taking....I have a peripheral interest in the STEM program locally.... and the gap between the math haves and the have nots is disturbing.....

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by kdaleb View Post
    Totally hear you Bart. My mom was a high school math teacher in the Vancouver, WA area. She retired in 98 and moved out to a small town Klickitat County. She would sub there sometimes, but spent most of her work and volunteer time at the church she attended. She moved back to Vancouver two years ago and took a long term sub job at Ft Vancouver. She was astonished at the inability of the students to handle basic algebraic concepts But how can you teach algebra if they can't multiply or divide. And the most frustrating part is they showed no interest in learning. Despite the fact that very few students knew how to do basic algebra, the scoring rubric the school provided to her (another long story... it was fairly opaque to the teacher, especially one who hadn't used it before) ended up having almost every student pass her class. She was shocked at the change in the last 20 years.

    It's odd... my own sixth grader is with a group of students being fast tracked in math - he'll be taking Algebra 1 for high school credit as a 7th grader (which apparently is not uncommon at least in the Vancouver School District), but then here in the same district high school sophomores are passing Algebra 1 without being able to solve fairly simple equations.
    Nice story, enjoyed hearing it, informative, too.

    I fit in during that time when she actually taught, and I could not stand math, hated every single thing about it, could not figure out at all what use any of it would be (other than basic add/subtract, divide/times). I think it was taught wrong back then, at least in my school (very likely your mother did a much better job teaching it).

    Someone needed to tell me that math is used to describe the physical world, all the way down to the most sophisticated leading theories in theoretical physics. Now with computers, it is also used in all-important algorithms.

    Perhaps nothing would have worked (good chance given my laziness) but had someone really demonstrated why math is at the root of absolutely everything, from how a rock falls and why, to the way an economy functions. Top economists are near or equal to the theoretical physicists in their math abilities.

    Nowadays, I read chaos theory, quantum mechanics, and theoretical physics for fun, just fascinates me.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by kdaleb View Post
    Totally hear you Bart. My mom was a high school math teacher in the Vancouver, WA area. She retired in 98 and moved out to a small town Klickitat County. She would sub there sometimes, but spent most of her work and volunteer time at the church she attended. She moved back to Vancouver two years ago and took a long term sub job at Ft Vancouver. She was astonished at the inability of the students to handle basic algebraic concepts But how can you teach algebra if they can't multiply or divide. And the most frustrating part is they showed no interest in learning. Despite the fact that very few students knew how to do basic algebra, the scoring rubric the school provided to her (another long story... it was fairly opaque to the teacher, especially one who hadn't used it before) ended up having almost every student pass her class. She was shocked at the change in the last 20 years.

    It's odd... my own sixth grader is with a group of students being fast tracked in math - he'll be taking Algebra 1 for high school credit as a 7th grader (which apparently is not uncommon at least in the Vancouver School District), but then here in the same district high school sophomores are passing Algebra 1 without being able to solve fairly simple equations.
    Can kids even be held back in elementary school anymore? I got the sense that kids were just passed on to the next grade even if they struggled...which is its own problem when the rest of the class needs to backtrack instead of learning new skills. When I was in school they let us use calculators in Junior high school because we were doing more complex math, so I can see how some who may never have done well with basic math wouldn't improve in high school if they are able to use a calculator for those basic skills even if they're taking the more advanced classes.

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