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Thread: General Science Thread

  1. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bogozags View Post
    Those are some awesome pictures...THANKS for the find and sharing too!
    Thx - I like re-reading this whole thread b/c there are such great articles that I have forgotten about and I go back and re-read them.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
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  2. #102
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    A very special post for all joining us at the top of page 5.


    Did you ever wonder how an asteroid collision would kill you? Well, now you'll know: https://www.sciencenews.org/article/...ill-you?tgt=nr






    It won’t be a tsunami. Nor an earthquake. Not even the crushing impact of the space rock. No, if an asteroid kills you, gusting winds and shock waves from falling and exploding space rocks will most likely be to blame. That’s one of the conclusions of a recent computer simulation effort that investigated the fatality risks of more than a million possible asteroid impacts.




    These asteroids aren’t an everyday concern, but the consequences can be severe,” says Rumpf, of the University of Southampton in England.

    Huh, who would have guessed?





    The deadliness assessment began with a map of human populations and numerical simulations of the energies unleashed by falling asteroids. Those energies were then used alongside existing casualty data from studies of extreme weather and nuclear blasts to calculate the deadliness of the asteroids’ effects at different distances. Rumpf and his team focused on short-term impact effects, rather than long-term consequences such as climate change triggered by dust blown into the atmosphere.




    But asteroid impacts are scary enough that today’s astronomers scan the sky with automated telescopes scouting for potential impactors. So far, they’ve cataloged 27 percent of space rocks 140 meters or larger estimated to be whizzing through the solar system. Other scientists are crunching the numbers on ways to divert an earthbound asteroid. Proposals include whacking the asteroid like a billiard ball with a high-speed spacecraft or frying part of the asteroid’s surface with a nearby nuclear blast so that the vaporized material propels the asteroid away like a jet engine.


    N/A if it hits you on the head.
    Last edited by DZ; 05-02-2017 at 09:39 PM.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
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  3. #103
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    To continue with the "epoch" disaster theme, a theory on what causes "Super Volcano" eruptions: https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0529131034.htm





    The eruption of Mount Tambora in Indonesia in 1815 – the only known supervolcano eruption in modern history – was 10 times more powerful than Krakatoa and more than 100 times more powerful than Vesuvius or Mount St. Helens. It caused more than 100,000 deaths in Indonesia alone, and blew a column of ash about 70 kilometres into the atmosphere. The resulting disruptions of the planet’s climate led 1816 to be christened “the year without summer.”

    And this was a small supervolcano,” said Stix.


    Mt. Tambora

    “The magma was being stirred by the roof falling into the magma chamber,” Stix explained. “This causes lots of complicated flow effects that are unique to a supervolcano eruption.....

    Supervolcanoes are orders of magnitude greater than any volcanic eruption in historic times. They are capable of causing long-lasting change to weather, threatening the extinction of species, and covering huge areas with lava and ash.

    Tambora - a "small one" - was 100x greater than Mt. St. Helen's?????





    And, I can't include anything about Volcanoes without including one of the coolest videos of all time - posted on the OCC by Kitz (I think):




    The coolest part of that video is when they react to the shock wave. I just happened to watch a video on the St. Helen's eruption, and people 15 miles away described it as a feeling of being "squeezed to death" and the loudest noise they'd ever heard. Certainly believable when you see what looks puny in comparison, above, versus what was sees on St. Helens.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
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  4. #104
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    Not sure if this is science or not - close enough.

    "Top 5 waves ever caught on camera:

    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
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  5. #105
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    Pictures of St. Helens got me thinking about Ranier, Hood, and their destructive potential. So, for west side friends: http://geology.com/usgs/rainier/

    U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) research shows that Mount Rainier is one of our Nation's most dangerous volcanoes. It has been the source of countless eruptions and volcanic mudflows (lahars) that have surged down valleys on its flanks and buried broad areas now densely populated.


    During the past several thousand years large lahars have reached the Puget Sound lowland on average at least once every 500 to 1,000 years. Smaller flows not extending as far as the lowland occurred more frequently. If future large lahars happen at rates similar to those of the past, there is roughly a 1-in-10 chance of a lahar reaching the Puget Sound lowland during an average human lifespan.



    Studies by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists show that at least one of Mount Rainier's recent large landslide-generated lahars may have occurred when the volcano was quiet and not providing the warning signs typical of a restless and erupting volcano. In such a rare case, the only warning could be a report that a lahar is already underway








    When one adds the fact that Ranier seems overdue, along with the fact that the subduction zone earthquake - the 9.0 ones off the coast, also seem overdue, it makes living in the west side, somewhat "interesting."

    I find it interesting, it may not happen for 200 years, or even 500 - but pretty much everything over there is temporary. Same can be said of both Vancouver BC and Portland Oregon. Though, not sure about Mt. Hood. https://www.wired.com/2016/05/new-ea...cking-mt-hood/

    Remember, the Cascade volcanoes are remarkably quiet right now, but that doesn’t mean that we are “overdue” for any activity. They will, eventually, come back to life and we should be prepared for those new eruptions. However, as always, expect that volcanoes like Hood and St. Helens will occasionally remind us that they are potentially active volcanoes (that’s why we monitor them closely


    The evidence is the location of the swarm (not directly under Hood) and the fact that previous swarms off the main volcano have turned out to be mainly tectonic in origin. Quite a few regional faults run in this area south of Hood, so it isn’t surprising. So, sleep well Portlanders, it appears that Hood is just adjusting rather than really seeing any new magma intruding.
    Hope you enjoyed.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  6. #106
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    Check it out. http://www.sci-news.com/astronomy/ha...net-04856.html

    Astronomers have discovered that HAT-P-26b — a ‘warm Neptune’ orbiting a dwarf star approximately 437 light-years from Earth — has an atmosphere composed almost entirely of hydrogen and helium. A paper reporting this discovery is published in the journal Science.


    Ok.

    That's truly just breathtaking. We are 35 light years away. And yet, we can figure out there's a planet there, AND, figure out that it has an atmosphere, AND, how it is composed? They even say it's a THIN atmosphere, just for style points and degree of difficulty I guess.

    They earned a spot in the Science thread, even though it's not the sexiest news.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
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  7. #107
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    In news with more application to the day to day lives of - cough, **** - Foo members, ahem, *** - ...... https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0515122222.htm

    Trying new marijuana products and edibles is associated with unexpected highs

    A new study by RTI International suggests that unexpected highs are a consequence of using new marijuana products and edibles -- products that have flooded the marijuana market since legalization of recreational marijuana use.

    The study, published in Drug and Alcohol Dependence, found that in the context of legalization, many marijuana users will try new marijuana products and use edibles, and that doing so markedly increases the odds of experiencing an unexpected high.
    The research shows that most people who experienced an unexpected high slept it off, and others engaged in protective behaviors such as deciding not to drive or changing or cancelling plans. However, respondents also reported having unintended sex as a result of the unexpected high, and some ended up in the hospital, clinic or emergency room.



    Weird. The plant is so expensive, and yet looking at it, one would think it's just some weed.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  8. #108
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    Non-political. Whatever happens to be causing the Earth to warm, it's having an impact down south, way down south. https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0518140338.htm

    In 2013, researchers studying mosses and microbes growing at the southern end of the Antarctic Peninsula documented unprecedented ecological change over the last 50 years, driven by warming temperatures. Now, the same research group has confirmed that those striking changes in the Antarctic are widespread, occurring all across the Peninsula
    .



    "This gives us a much clearer idea of the scale over which these changes are occurring," says lead author Matthew Amesbury of the University of Exeter. "Previously, we had only identified such a response in a single location at the far south of the Antarctic Peninsula, but now we know that moss banks are responding to recent climate change across the whole of the Peninsula."
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  9. #109
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    In other global warming news, and relating back a story on the seed vault covered in page 2 of the thread - bad news. http://www.popularmechanics.com/scie...c=socialflowTW


    The Svalbard Global Seed Vault is a collection of almost a million seed packets containing every variety of crop in the world, embedded within a mountain beneath the Arctic permafrost in a container designed to last forever. Or at least, that was the plan. The exceedingly warm weather over the past several months actually melted enough of the permafrost to cause flooding inside the vault. The soaring temperatures led to heavy rains and flooding in a section of the entrance.




    Fortunately none of the seeds were compromised. To prevent something like this from happening again, the vault's managers are taking steps to flood-proof it. They're digging drainage tunnels, removing some excess electrical equipment, and installed pumps just in case. Still, the vault is supposed to be able to survive without any human intervention. This sort of flooding could happen again, and next time there might not be any humans around to fix it. If we want our doomsday safeguard to survive for the next few centuries, we'll need to either reverse global warming completely or come up with some way for our seeds—and maybe ourselves—to survive it.



    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

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    I'm proud of this thread, near to my heart, so a total eclipse will be fully covered. Expect to soon see threads on various campsites that provide great views. I picked 3 places closest to the Spokane area. If there are special requests, I am happy to find those places, too.

    You don't just want to plan great views, you must factor in average weather and pick the driest of places, b/c trust me, having it clouded out, it sux. https://www.usatoday.com/story/trave...ipse/98629578/


    John Day Fossil Beds National Monument, Ore.

    The National Park Service is already planning for crowds in what’s usually a quiet corner of Oregon. The monument’s three units, known for an abundance of plant and animal fossils, will all plunge into darkness for up to two minutes. “It’s a wonderful setting with a great chance of clear skies,” Moromisato says. The monument bookstore will carry eclipse-viewing glasses and filters, but suggests visitors bring their own in case they sell out. nps.gov/joda



    Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve, Idaho


    Moromisato says there’s a certain symmetry to watching an eclipse involving the moon on a landscape named after the moon. “It’s an otherworldly place right at the edge of the path.” Total darkness will last about a minute. nps.gov/crmo
    Grand Teton National Park, Wyo.

    The famed Rockies park sits in the middle of the eclipse path and will experience up to two minutes and 20 seconds of darkness. Moromisato says rangers will likely provide programming for the event. “It’s another great reason to see it in a national park as opposed to the middle of a highway somewhere.” nps.gov/grte




    *I will note that Grand Teton is normally busy in the summer and likely to be the busiest of this list.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  11. #111
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    Today my 5 year old taught me that if you put a chicken bone in vinegar it will become bendable, they watched it on Bill Nye because the gym was set up for graduation.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DixieZag View Post
    I'm proud of this thread, near to my heart, so a total eclipse will be fully covered. Expect to soon see threads on various campsites that provide great views. I picked 3 places closest to the Spokane area. If there are special requests, I am happy to find those places, too.

    You don't just want to plan great views, you must factor in average weather and pick the driest of places, b/c trust me, having it clouded out, it sux. https://www.usatoday.com/story/trave...ipse/98629578/













    *I will note that Grand Teton is normally busy in the summer and likely to be the busiest of this list.
    I wonder what time it will cross South Carolina...I will be here with bells on...

  13. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bogozags View Post
    I wonder what time it will cross South Carolina...I will be here with bells on...
    This map/image has the times on them, if you look diagonally. As someone who's lived down there, I urge you to really factor in where the weather is likely to be dry at that time, early afternoon, 2:30 p.m. or so, you know well that T-storms get rollin' right about then. And you don't want to be part of a insane car rush on the interstate going 90 mph trying to find a place with no clouds.

    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  14. #114
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    Ok, just stop it. http://www.esquire.com/news-politics...hunt-in-packs/

    These Snakes Hunt in Packs



    Scientists recently discovered a species of snake, the Cuban boa, that launch coordinated attacks using teamwork to catch its prey, marking the first time the behavior has been documented in snakes.

    University of Tennessee scientist Vladimir Dinets studied nine Cuban boas by living with them in a sinkhole cave in Desembarco del Granma National Park, Cuba. He published the results of his findings in Animal Behavior and Cognition
    .
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
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  15. #115
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    May or may not be science, but sure is fun. Please check it out, seven of the world's largest man-made holes. I include just one, for fair use. You should hit the link and see the other six.

    http://www.esquire.com/lifestyle/g32...manmade-holes/



    Thanks to the University of Wisconsin, the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station in Antarctica has 86 cables that reach beneath the ice, supporting 60 digital optical modules that relay data from the depths to the surface above. And that surface is a long ways away. The modules hang at depths starting at 4,750 feet all the way down to over 8,000 feet, or 1.5 miles. It took seven years to drill holes for the cables, done in the Southern Hemisphere's summer and with a 25,000-pound hot water hose that melted roughly 200,000 gallons of water per hole.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  16. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by DixieZag View Post
    This map/image has the times on them, if you look diagonally. As someone who's lived down there, I urge you to really factor in where the weather is likely to be dry at that time, early afternoon, 2:30 p.m. or so, you know well that T-storms get rollin' right about then. And you don't want to be part of a insane car rush on the interstate going 90 mph trying to find a place with no clouds.

    Dixie - Thanks for pulling this up...you and ZN are both incredible in being able to find things on the net! :-)

  17. #117
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bogozags View Post
    Dixie - Thanks for pulling this up...you and ZN are both incredible in being able to find things on the net! :-)
    Happy to do it.

    If anyone has any requests, feel free.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
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  18. #118
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    Quote Originally Posted by DixieZag View Post
    A very special post for all joining us at the top of page 5.


    Did you ever wonder how an asteroid collision would kill you? Well, now you'll know: https://www.sciencenews.org/article/...ill-you?tgt=nr















    Huh, who would have guessed?















    N/A if it hits you on the head.
    Thought you would find this interesting: if the asteroid had been a few minutes later/earlier, dinosaurs might not have been wiped out.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.5fd200798ef5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pallet View Post
    Thought you would find this interesting: if the asteroid had been a few minutes later/earlier, dinosaurs might not have been wiped out.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.5fd200798ef5

    That is an amazing story. I really loved the end of it.

    Ben Garrod, an evolutionary biologist who appears in the program, said global temperatures plunged more than 50 degrees within days.

    “This is where we get to the great irony of the story — because in the end it wasn’t the size of the asteroid, the scale of blast, or even its global reach that made dinosaurs extinct — it was where the impact happened,” Garrod said.

    “In this cold, dark world, food ran out of the oceans within a week and shortly after on land,” he added. “With nothing to eat anywhere on the planet, the mighty dinosaurs stood little chance of survival.”
    Really wonderful article.

    What would it have been like to view it? Safely, say from Spokane or the NW? I wonder how long/if mankind would survive in some form if one that size hit today.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
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  20. #120
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    I looked this up because I have these, very intense ones. Thought others would: https://www.thecut.com/2015/09/why-d...ng-asleep.html

    Hypnic jerk or sleep start.

    It’s a sudden increase in muscle activity that happens to just about everybody and can be quite literally startling, though the intensity depends on the person, says Carl Bazil, M.D. Ph.D., director of the Sleep Disorders Center at New York–Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center.

    During this transitional state, the sleeping mechanism usually wins, but the wakeful one sometimes puts up a fight. “One of the things that happens as you fall asleep is your muscles relax, but the awake part may still be stimulating enough that it will temporarily overreact and you get this jerk of muscle activity,” he says. And for reasons that are unclear, it’s sometimes accompanied by an image.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  21. #121
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    Ok - My biggest risk yet. Remember, this is FUN for me, not a serious care either way. i just like thinking the "what if." http://www.collective-evolution.com/...fo-technology/

    This is Ben Rich. He was manager of Lockheeds Skunk Works, the top top MI Defense Contractor:



    And here's what he said at a formal talk to UCLA engineering department:

    “We already have the means to travel among the stars, but these technologies are locked up in black projects, and it would take an act of God to ever get them out to benefit humanity. Anything you can imagine, we already know how to do it.”
    And:
    When Rich was asked how UFO propulsion worked, he said, “Let me ask you. How does ESP work?” The questioner responded with, “All points in time and space are connected?” Rich then said, “That’s how it works!” (This seems to be related to Quantum entanglement, you can read more about that here.)
    *I will point out that quantum entanglement is real, and since some information passes faster than light, is it that out there that we can travel ftl, too?

    Here's Gordon Cooper: Legend



    Man was respected by everyone. Why on God's green Earth would he lie right before he died? Just a question.

    Here's Buzz Aldrin on what's maybe on the moon. He's been there, have you?



    I am ridiculed, plenty. Despite the fact I went into this as sneering and smug as anyone. I just wanted tinfoil hat stuff for a book. But, when I hear the manager of Skunk Works, and 2 legendary astronauts say stuff like this, I often wonder, who the fk am I to tell these people they're crazy?

    Is that ALL THAT crazy? I invite you to say, "yes" and will listen respectfully.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  22. #122
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    The above is for fun, that's all I take it as, don't be mean, please.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  23. #123
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    "It's a great big universe and we're all really puny..." according to the Animaniacs.
    So I'm usually very very skeptical about any UFO/alien stuff, it's just not something I really believe in, but I totally believe in ghosts haha which is weird to a lot of people...but if you think about it, is Buzz Aldrin's story all that much different from someone who's skeptical and moves to a house and says they hear things they can't explain? Not really. It's just that not a lot of people have seen the universe the way he has and basically no one has lived in that house to share any stories yet but him and a few others, so I can understand his broader pov. But at the same time I feel like anything intelligent enough to build space ships probably would have better things to do with their time than watch humans (it's equally hard to believe any ghosts would be desperate enough to "talk" to the three meatheads on Ghost Adventures haha).

  24. #124
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzgirl_127 View Post
    "It's a great big universe and we're all really puny..." according to the Animaniacs.
    So I'm usually very very skeptical about any UFO/alien stuff, it's just not something I really believe in, but I totally believe in ghosts haha which is weird to a lot of people...but if you think about it, is Buzz Aldrin's story all that much different from someone who's skeptical and moves to a house and says they hear things they can't explain? Not really. It's just that not a lot of people have seen the universe the way he has and basically no one has lived in that house to share any stories yet but him and a few others, so I can understand his broader pov. But at the same time I feel like anything intelligent enough to build space ships probably would have better things to do with their time than watch humans (it's equally hard to believe any ghosts would be desperate enough to "talk" to the three meatheads on Ghost Adventures haha).
    It's kind of funny, I don't believe in ghosts 1%, but I'm willing to "think" about the things these guys are saying and what they've seen (especially Gordo Cooper). And yet, my cousin, who lives in an old house, without any sort of intent to convince me of anything, continually tells me about the fact that he wakes up (he lives alone) and will find that huge potted plants that he can barely move, will switch corners in the room, etc. To which I say ....nothing. I just shake my head and go "wow" and am glad nothing like that happens to me.

    And I agree on the premise about advanced species looking at us like ants, or at least so far beneath them it's not worth their time, and yet we have entire textbooks on ants ....which does nothing but make me re-think that justification.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

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    I just want to point out, the video of Buzz Aldrin is only included for that small part where he says that a light followed them the whole way to the moon, not all that other stuff, which I think is way way out there.

    But, the guy who actually made the journey, saying "something followed us" and Gordon Cooper saying he filmed a saucer landing on a lake bed, and gave the video to the intelligence people (and never saw it again) is something that kind of creeps me out.

    I mean, just look at his face. He looks awfully serious, and angry about the whole subject.

    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

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