Page 4 of 26 FirstFirst 1234567814 ... LastLast
Results 76 to 100 of 633

Thread: General Science Thread

  1. #76
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    15,765

    Default

    P
    Quote Originally Posted by DixieZag View Post
    Wow, wow - thanx for posting.

    I knew that they'd been looking and looking and looking, not even sure how to look - and I had absolutely no idea they'd found evidence this year.

    It truly is a breakthrough. I've known of the "missing parts" in Einstein's General Relativity. Not that it's wrong, we wouldn't have anywhere near such accurate satellite gps if they didn't factor in relativity even at that short distance, I don't understand any of it about anything other than the scientists saying there are holes to their understanding. And, pretty well anything truly new has to at least be part of a search for Dark Matter.

    Just, wow. Great post.
    I am pretty sure we had a post on this in the thread in the OCC. If you have the chance, go see the LIGO observatory at Hanford. That is one of the two labs involved in this discovery. The other is in Louisiana. There are two so they can effectively cancel out false background signals.
    'I found it is the small everyday deeds of ordinary folk that keep the darkness at bay… small acts of kindness and love.'
    - Gandalf the Grey

    ________________________________



    Foo Time

  2. #77
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    15,765

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DixieZag View Post
    There have been a spectacular number of failures with Mars missions, far more than one would even expect, giving conspiracy theorists (which, yes, I study) a field day.

    Check out the last pic of a Russian satellite just before it met it's untimely end. That is "something" coming out of Phobos, the moon on Mars that has a density that led an actual real Russian scientist to argue it was hollowed out. (It's only a couple dozen miles across).




    There is this "weird" picture of the "monolith" on Phobos:



    Of which, Buzz Aldrin, either the second man on the moon, or a crazed conspiracy theorist said;



    There is the light on Mars - this, btw, is real, and they have no idea what it is or what caused it.



    This is also a real NASA pic from the mars surface watching something rise over the surface:

    'I found it is the small everyday deeds of ordinary folk that keep the darkness at bay… small acts of kindness and love.'
    - Gandalf the Grey

    ________________________________



    Foo Time

  3. #78
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    18,473

    Default

    Before you go too overboard mocking me, you'll have to include Buzz Aldrin - a guy who has walked on the moon, something I haven't done, perhaps you've had the chance. https://socioecohistory.wordpress.co...ial-structure/

    “There’s a monolith (on Martian Moon Phobos) there! A very unusual structure on this little potato shape object that goes around Mars once in 7 hours! When people find out about that, they are going to say ‘who put that there?'”
    – Astronaut Buzz Aldrin, 2nd person to walk on the Moon
    So - to be fair, you really got to mock both of us. Floor is yours!

    And, also in my defense, one runs across this stuff when needing to research the questionable.....bwahahahah
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  4. #79
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    18,473

    Default

    This is real cool. Just military guys being military guys, more bravery in one hour than me in one decade.

    First flight and landing at South Pole, 60 something years ago; https://www.nsf.gov/discoveries/disc...=NSF&from=news



    On October 31, 1956, seven U.S. naval aviators did what many thought was impossible...they landed a plane for the first time at the bottom of the world. The pilot, Lt. Cmdr. Conrad C. "Gus" Shinn landed the twin-engined R4D-5 Skytrain nicknamed Que Sera Sera, at 8:34 p.m. local time, skidding to a stop at 90 degrees South latitude. With engines running to avoid freeze-up, U.S. Navy Admiral George J. Dufek, commander of Operation Deep Freeze, quickly stepped out onto the frozen terrain and planted the Stars and Stripes at the South Pole.

    After 49 minutes on the ice, the crew left the South Pole and returned to what is now NSF's McMurdo Station. The flight not only proved that a remote station could be supported by air, but opened up the continent to scientific discovery. Many more flights would follow, bringing construction materials and cargo needed to build the first of three research stations that would be built on the continent over the years. The flights also brought in scientists eager to tackle this vast unknown
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  5. #80
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    18,473

    Default

    Darn it! Cool post about landing planes at the South Pole and it went down so fast? Won't let that happen.

    Big ups to our military, guys willing to land on Normandy? Yep, and guys willing to "land" on the South Pole - amazing.

    Nowadays, all the computerization, improvements to aviation, improvements in equipment at the pole, I'll bet it's not fun, but not nearly as dangerous as it once was. Those guys way back when, flying by stick and gauges? Good stuff.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  6. #81
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    in the middle
    Posts
    3,519

    Default

    Seems to be a lot of space science in this thread. Wish I had found it before my last couple of units. Ugh. I have never been fond of teaching space science - I never planned on having to do it. But my newest job requires it. Yesterday one of my students wanted to know why the albedo of the moon is so low - is the dirt there darker in color. My response "Well, I haven't actually visited to confirm, but based on these numbers, I would say yes." I got a couple of giggles. Love those kids!
    ...and there definitely is no such thing as Prince Charming.

  7. #82
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    18,473

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mee755 View Post
    Seems to be a lot of space science in this thread. Wish I had found it before my last couple of units. Ugh. I have never been fond of teaching space science - I never planned on having to do it. But my newest job requires it. Yesterday one of my students wanted to know why the albedo of the moon is so low - is the dirt there darker in color. My response "Well, I haven't actually visited to confirm, but based on these numbers, I would say yes." I got a couple of giggles. Love those kids!
    I try to give my audience what they want, and there are other good posters and some actual real scientists around that enjoy commenting, etc. I'm not. I just post what I read and like - and there is a lot of space stuff.

    Glad to have you. Post away.

    Here's a thing: http://listverse.com/2015/01/05/10-r...e-can-explain/



    Planet HD106902 is a head scratcher. It is 11 times the size of Jupiter. But, the behemoth exists 640 A.U. from its star, incredible when one realizes that Neptune stretches a mere 30 A.U. from our sun, throwing everything planetary scientist know about gas giant planetary formation into disarray. Generally, scientists believe that insufficient amounts of the solar ring exist at such distances to create such formations that far from the star. Scientists also considered that this could be an example of a failed binary star, except binary star ratios are rarely greater than even 10:1. But, this planet - large as it is - is only one-hundredth the size of it's potential binary twin, leaving scientists to another dead end.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  8. #83
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    18,473

    Default

    Been a long long time, but the General Science Thread must have any story that is about "Extinct, humongous, ginormous, sloths" and the humongous tunnels they dug. http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/cr.../#.WN_RU-R-6Y7



    Frank believes the biggest burrows – measuring up to five feet in diameter – were dug by ground sloths. He and his colleagues consider as possibilities several genera that once lived in South America and whose fossil remains suggest adaptation for serious digging: Catonyx, Glossotherium and the massive, several-ton Lestodon. Others believe that extinct armadillos such as Pampatherium, Holmesina or Propraopus, though smaller than the sloths, were responsible for even the largest burrows.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  9. #84
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    The Pub
    Posts
    7,535

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DixieZag View Post
    Been a long long time, but the General Science Thread must have any story that is about "Extinct, humongous, ginormous, sloths" and the humongous tunnels they dug. http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/cr.../#.WN_RU-R-6Y7

    Dixie -

    I tried to read this, but the link kept redirecting to a spam site.
    MCMM 2020: Who Wants Some Cheese?

  10. #85
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    Posts
    1,592

    Default

    Super fauna would have been really cool to see...From a safe distance, massive grizzlies and lions.

  11. #86
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    18,473

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Martin Centre Mad Man View Post
    Dixie -

    I tried to read this, but the link kept redirecting to a spam site.
    Sorry, MMM - let me try again on another site: http://www.esquire.com/news-politics...xtinct-sloths/

    Try going from there b/c that's the original blurb with links to Discovery Mag. It is cool!
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  12. #87
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    The Pub
    Posts
    7,535

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DixieZag View Post
    Sorry, MMM - let me try again on another site: http://www.esquire.com/news-politics...xtinct-sloths/

    Try going from there b/c that's the original blurb with links to Discovery Mag. It is cool!
    Cool read. Thanks for sharing.
    MCMM 2020: Who Wants Some Cheese?

  13. #88
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    18,473

    Default

    Submitted without comment. https://www.sciencenews.org/article/...l-super-slimer

    A new species of worm-snail is rather snotty. Thylacodes vandyensis shoots out strands of mucus that tangle together, building a spiderweb-like trap for plankton and other floating snacks, researchers report April 5 in PeerJ.
    Other worm-snails use this hunting technique, but T. vandyensis stands out because of the “copious amounts of mucus” it ejects, says coauthor Rüdiger Bieler. This goo net, which can stretch up to 5 centimeters across, exits the animal’s tentacles at, of course, “a snail’s pace,” jokes Bieler, a curator at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  14. #89
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    18,473

    Default

    There could be life on Enceladus: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/...ushpmg00000009

    Researchers made the announcement based on data from 2015, when the spacecraft Cassini detected the presence of hydrogen during a flyby through a plume of gas and ice erupting from Enceladus’ south pole. The hydrogen, which is escaping into space from a hydrothermal vent on the moon’s seafloor, could be a sign of methanogenesis, a form of anaerobic respiration in which microbes produce methane.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  15. #90
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    18,473

    Default

    I find it amazing how deep the oceans on these moons are. I don't understand how some moons are made of rock, w/ no water, some are almost all water.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  16. #91
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    18,473

    Default

    Dinosaurs oldest known relative, pre-dates the dinos, obviously: https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifes...=.627df7c5e579




    Scientists have identified the oldest known relative of the dinosaurs and are expressing surprise at how little it resembled one.

    Researchers on Wednesday described fossils of a long-necked, four-legged, meat-eating reptile called Teleocrater rhadinus. It reached up to 10 feet long and prowled across what is now Tanzania, in East Africa, about 245 million years ago.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  17. #92
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    18,473

    Default

    Crack in glacier that holds ice with one foot of sea level rise. http://www.dailykos.com/stories/2017...matic-break-up

    Since the drama of 2010 and 2012, another large crack has begun to open and stretch towards the center of Petermann’s ice shelf — which suggests the shelf could lose another large “ice island” soon. That’s bad enough, but this week Stef Lhermitte, a researcher at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands who studies Greenland using satellites, posted images suggesting the development of a second and different sort of crack, one that could potentially link up with the first one.


    This crack, oddly, appeared to have formed in the middle of the ice shelf, rather than on its side where cracks usually begin. But given its location, it could potentially connect with the pre-existing crack
    Really good graphic here: https://twitter.com/StefLhermitte/st...381762/photo/1
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  18. #93
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    18,473

    Default

    Very cool: http://mashable.com/2017/04/17/first...r#n71x8eFUakqt



    On Tuesday morning, NASA will broadcast its first-ever rocket launch livestream in 360-degree video, providing an unprecedented vantage point that will make viewers feel as if they are standing on the launch pad at Cape Canaveral.


    The launch of the United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket—aimed at transporting supplies to the International Space Station—is scheduled for a 30-minute window beginning at 11:11 a.m. ET
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  19. #94
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    18,473

    Default

    Rockfish Venom evolved to inflict pain: https://www.sciencenews.org/article/...s-inflict-pain

    most fish stings are, in fact, quite painful themselves — some scientists suspect fish venom is worth a look. Studying the way venom molecules from diverse fishes inflict pain might help researchers understand how nerve cells sense pain and lead to novel ways to dull the sensation

    An estimated 7 to 9 percent of fishes, close to 3,000 species, are venomous, Smith’s work suggests. Venomous fishes are found in freshwater and saltwater, including some stingrays, catfishes and stonefishes. Yet stinging fishes haven’t gotten the same attention from scientists as snakes and other venomous creatures
    That's because snakes are terrifying and live on the land, where we hang out. Fish don't.

    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  20. #95
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    18,473

    Default

    Seems about 20-30 of you follow regularly, so special treat as a thank you.

    Our newest/best "Earth-Type" exoplanet. http://www.dailykos.com/stories/2017...arth-Exoplanet

    LHS 1140b, an Exoplanet orbiting a red dwarf star 40 light-years away may be the new holder of the title “best place to look for signs of life beyond the Solar System”, according to an international team of astronomers. eso.org/...

    LHS 1140b is a rocky planet, a little larger and much denser than Earth and has likely retained an atmosphere. It orbits in the habitable zone around its faint red dwarf star LHS 1140, located in the constellation of Cetus. The orbit is seen almost edge-on from Earth, making detection and analysis of its atmosphere, possible during transits.

  21. #96
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    18,473

    Default

    Closer than we'd like to see: https://www.wired.com/2017/04/astero...red-tons-data/

    This week, a kilometer-wide asteroid whizzed by within about a million miles of this planet—about four and half times the distance between the Earth and the moon. A near miss? Not really. The odds of 2014 JO25 actually hitting Earth were around one in a million .



    I find it fascinating that annually, we play Earth "lotto" with things that could change history forever, possibly extinguish us as a species. Think of it - what if that asteroid just happened to be one million miles over? Our lives, should we have them, would be significantly different right now.

    I just find thinking about these things fascinating, I hope you enjoy the articles.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  22. #97
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    18,473

    Default

    This may be posted here somewhere already, but not enough.

    Perhaps the greatest picture ever taken by mankind. Hubble's ultra-deep space field.

    Is it not mind-bending that these galaxies are near 13 billion light years away? The beginning of our baby universe?

    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  23. #98
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    18,473

    Default

    One corner of Hawaii is one of the world's dirtiest beaches. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/...ushpmg00000009





    On the island’s southeastern side, Kamilo Point looks like a wasteland, despite its tide pools and pockets of lava rock. The ocean’s currents and powerful trade winds deposit thousands of pounds of man-made trash on this beach each year.


    One look, and it’s no wonder how this became known as one of the dirtiest beaches in the world. Some call it Plastic Beach.[/
    "Paper or plastic" should be the easiest question you ever get asked. And, this isn't the really dangerous plastic, the really dangerous stuff is that which has broken down into sizes too small to see and are in the food chain.

    The Big Island’s southeastern shore is relatively close to the eastern Pacific garbage patch, which is part of the massive convergence of marine litter known as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. The easternmost concentration of trash is midway between the California coast and the eastern shores of Hawaii.









    It’s a graveyard for the world’s junk and a stark reminder that plastic can never really be thrown away.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  24. #99
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    18,473

    Default

    Hope people check this way down here, special treat. Scientists discover a new "aurora" and - for now - it's named "Steve." Some really beautiful pictures: http://www.esquire.com/news-politics...-aurora-steve/



    While the scientists know that Steve is "a ribbon of very hot and fast moving gas moving at a speed of about six kilometers per second in a westward direction," according to Donovan, they still have more research to do.


    It was Chris Ratzlaff, a photographer who runs the Alberta Aurora Chasers Facebook group, who came up with the name, an idea he got from the animated movie, Over the Hedge.

    In it, a group of animals name an unknown entity on the other side of the hedge "Steve." "It's a completely meaningless name, which is really useful for things that aren't understood," Ratzlaff said.


    Members of the Alberta Aurora Chasers Facebook group have been taking photos of this bright purple streak of light in the skies over Canada for several years now, thinking it was a kind aurora called a proton aurora.



    But when they met with Eric Donovan, a professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Calgary, he pointed out that proton aurora can't be seen by the naked eye and they had in fact discovered something else.
    That is a cool one, hope you guys liked it.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  25. #100
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Hilton Head (Bluffton), SC
    Posts
    4,892

    Default

    Those are some awesome pictures...THANKS for the find and sharing too!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •