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  1. #476
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    Just a thought. Fifty years ago mankind walked on the moon. It was the most remarkable feat of exploration in history. Seemingly everyone on the planet was in awe and engaged. Rightly so. What happened after baffles me to this day. Apollo 12 was just as incredible but the world didn’t pay nearly as much attention. It was like we’d already seen the movie and the sequel was okay but not as good as the original. It took a near disaster of Apollo 13 to bring the audience back. And then? A nearly complete lack of interest resulting in little progress for five decades.

    Finally, we are embarking on programs that will ultimately result in a permanent presence on the moon and on Mars. Finally there is support from leadership in this country. I would love to live long enough to see another incredible “small step “.

  2. #477
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    Quote Originally Posted by Markburn1 View Post
    Just a thought. Fifty years ago mankind walked on the moon. It was the most remarkable feat of exploration in history. Seemingly everyone on the planet was in awe and engaged. Rightly so. What happened after baffles me to this day. Apollo 12 was just as incredible but the world didn’t pay nearly as much attention. It was like we’d already seen the movie and the sequel was okay but not as good as the original. It took a near disaster of Apollo 13 to bring the audience back. And then? A nearly complete lack of interest resulting in little progress for five decades.

    Finally, we are embarking on programs that will ultimately result in a permanent presence on the moon and on Mars. Finally there is support from leadership in this country. I would love to live long enough to see another incredible “small step “.
    It is remarkable, isn't it?

    You know this, bc you've done the same reading that I have done, but at the height of the space race, NASA's budget equated to 5% of the overall federal budget. BUT, much of that was money that was sorta both "defense and NASA" where the line was blurred.

    ****
    Dark matter particles won’t kill you. If they could, they would have already https://www.sciencenews.org/article/...-wont-kill-you


    The fact that no one seems to have been killed by speeding blobs of dark matter puts limits on how large and deadly these particles can be, a study posted July 18 at arXiv.org suggests.

    Physicists think the invisible dark matter must exist because they can see its gravitational effects on visible matter throughout the cosmos. But no one knows what it’s actually made of. Among the leading candidates are weakly interacting massive particles, or WIMPs, but scientists have hunted for them for decades with no success (SN: 6/23/18, p. 13).

    Theoretically, macros could have almost any size and mass. …..— decided to do a gut check using human flesh as a dark matter detector.

    If a macro as small as a square micrometer zipped through your body at hypersonic speed, it would deposit about as much energy in your body as a typical metal bullet, the team calculated. But the damage it caused would be different from that of a bullet: A macro would heat the cylinder of tissue in its wake to about 10,000,000° Celsius — vaporizing the tissue and leaving a path of plasma.

    “It’s like if you were in Star Wars, and a Jedi hit you with their lightsaber, or someone shot you with their phaser [gun],” Starkman says.

    Lightsaber? Blasters? Let's do the science:


    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
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  3. #478
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    Haha. All that high tech ####..lightsabers, Blasters, Artificial intelligence, cool flying machines, force fields, etc.

    And all it took was some reinforced steel cable to take down the bad guys.

    What they really needed was a dark matter projectile. Haha. Or NOT.

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    When we were at the science center this weekend, there was actually a display on all of the everyday gadgets inspired by Star Trek.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Markburn1 View Post
    Haha. All that high tech ####..lightsabers, Blasters, Artificial intelligence, cool flying machines, force fields, etc.

    And all it took was some reinforced steel cable to take down the bad guys.

    What they really needed was a dark matter projectile. Haha. Or NOT.
    The Empire had a substantial gap in their operational planning and employment capabilities. Most of those guys working for the Empire deserved to be choked to death by Darth Vader, they were incompetent idiots. No concept of the tried and true American approach of air superiority and long-range fires.
    'I found it is the small everyday deeds of ordinary folk that keep the darkness at bay… small acts of kindness and love.'
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    Quote Originally Posted by kitzbuel View Post
    The Empire had a substantial gap in their operational planning and employment capabilities. Most of those guys working for the Empire deserved to be choked to death by Darth Vader, they were incompetent idiots. No concept of the tried and true American approach of air superiority and long-range fires.
    If you were an interdependent contractor... would YOU have worked for the Empire?

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    Quote Originally Posted by kitzbuel View Post
    The Empire had a substantial gap in their operational planning and employment capabilities. Most of those guys working for the Empire deserved to be choked to death by Darth Vader, they were incompetent idiots. No concept of the tried and true American approach of air superiority and long-range fires.
    Whichever engineer came up with the imperial walker needed to be shot upon presenting the design. What utility is something that can be defeated by cables, or ropes and ewoks?


    I know nothing about anything mechanical and yet I can tell that a big rolling ball would have been more effective than an unbalanced dinosaur.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
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    Quote Originally Posted by DixieZag View Post
    Whichever engineer came up with the imperial walker needed to be shot upon presenting the design. What utility is something that can be defeated by cables, or ropes and ewoks?


    I know nothing about anything mechanical and yet I can tell that a big rolling ball would have been more effective than an unbalanced dinosaur.
    The rebel tow cables, on the other hand, were an engineering marvel. They were thin enough that a single speeder could coil hundreds of meters of cable on that small platform, but the tensile strength was incredible. They could withstand the full force the walker legs without snapping.
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  9. #484
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martin Centre Mad Man View Post
    The rebel tow cables, on the other hand, were an engineering marvel. They were thin enough that a single speeder could coil hundreds of meters of cable on that small platform, but the tensile strength was incredible. They could withstand the full force the walker legs without snapping.
    Yes! I hadn't thought of that, the weight and the length would have made for quite a load under those rather undersized units. Obviously they must have been constructed with the imperial walkers in mind all along, which makes one wonder what it was they were doing shooting at them at the beginning, since it would seem obvious they knew that their lasers wouldn't pierce the outer core.

    But while the speeders used space very efficiently, imagine the wasted steel/iron/whaever that went into the walkers.

    Of course, these were people who built death stars, evidently they had access to plenty of material.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  10. #485
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    Quote Originally Posted by kitzbuel View Post
    The Empire had a substantial gap in their operational planning and employment capabilities. Most of those guys working for the Empire deserved to be choked to death by Darth Vader, they were incompetent idiots. No concept of the tried and true American approach of air superiority and long-range fires.
    I did have to go back and remember why The Empire had to land forces on Hoth in the first place.

    Lord Vader had planned to surprise attack the Rebel Alliance by jumping in to the Hoth system from hyperspace secretly and destroying the base via orbital bombardment, but failed to do so when Admiral Kendal Ozzel jumped too close to the system. This alerted the Rebels, who in return activated their shield generator, causing the anger of Vader, who blamed Ozzel for stupidity and Force choked him upon General Maximillian Veers reporting the blunder. Afterwards he promoted Firmus Piett to the rank of Admiral. Due to the failed attempt of bombing the rebel base, Veers landed AT-ATs, AT-STs and other ground troops to take care of the shield generator from inside it.
    https://starwars.fandom.com/wiki/Orbital_bombardment

    Orbital bombardment would have been much more effective. Again, Imperial leaders worked hard to earn their chokings.
    'I found it is the small everyday deeds of ordinary folk that keep the darkness at bay… small acts of kindness and love.'
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  11. #486
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    Quote Originally Posted by kitzbuel View Post
    I did have to go back and remember why The Empire had to land forces on Hoth in the first place.



    https://starwars.fandom.com/wiki/Orbital_bombardment

    Orbital bombardment would have been much more effective. Again, Imperial leaders worked hard to earn their chokings.
    They always choked on the big ones.
    Hoping you have a sense of humor too!

  12. #487
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    Quote Originally Posted by willandi View Post
    They always choked on the big ones.
    First good chuckle of the morning. Yes, I have a sense of humor, too.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  13. #488
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    Debate over the universe’s expansion rate may unravel physics. Is it a crisis? https://www.sciencenews.org/article/...physics-crisis


    In a room just steps from the ocean in Santa Barbara, astronomers and physicists shifted restlessly in their chairs. Sunshine and sea breezes beckoned, but the scientists had cloistered themselves to debate one of the biggest quandaries in physics: how fast the universe is expanding

    Estimates based on exploding stars, or supernovas, had suggested that the universe is growing approximately 10 percent faster than indicated by light emitted just after the Big Bang, about 13.8 billion years ago. Now, a measurement based on observations of luminous objects called quasars had pushed the problem beyond a statistical benchmark known as five sigma, denoting that the issue was something to take seriously.

    Much is at stake, including scientists’ basic understanding of what the universe contains and how it evolves over time. So far, a theory known as the standard cosmological model has succeeded in explaining a wide variety of cosmic observations. But the discrepancy in measurements of the universe’s expansion could mean the model itself needs to be drastically altered.

    I don't understand one equation of the underlying science, but when I hear that the standard model might need drastic alteration, I understand why it's a crisis. Careers are on the line.



    Standard Model Intro (5 minutes):

    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
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  14. #489
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    This is a good one. https://www.sciencenews.org/article/...ic-snow?tgt=nr


    Exploding stars scattered traces of iron over Antarctic snow.

    Unlike previous similar detections, the interstellar material dribbled down on Earth recently


    Iron from outside the solar system has sprinkled down on Antarctica in recent years. Measurements of half a ton of snow turned up interstellar iron deposited within the last two decades, scientists report in a study accepted in Physical Review Letters. That iron comes from the explosions of massive stars, or supernovas, the team says.
    Within the snow, the researchers isolated 10 atoms of iron-60, a radioactive variety, or isotope, of iron with a total of 60 protons and neutrons in its nucleus. Previous studies have found iron-60, an isotope spewed from supernovas, in ocean sediments and on the moon (SN: 7/10/99, p. 21)

    This part is fascinating:


    The result could help scientists better understand humankind’s place in space. The solar system resides within a low-density pocket of gas, known as the local bubble. It’s thought that exploding supernovas created shock waves that blasted out that bubble. But the solar system currently sits inside a denser region within that bubble, known as the Local Interstellar Cloud. The detection of recently deposited iron-60 suggests that this cloud may also have been sculpted by supernovas, the researchers say

    I always enjoy thinking about the fact that every atom in our body weighing more than lithium was created in a supernova. We are all, literally, stardust. With souls.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

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    A Glitch, the Matrix, and stuff we may never know.

    https://www.cnet.com/news/astronomer...et-explain-it/

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    Quote Originally Posted by Markburn1 View Post
    A Glitch, the Matrix, and stuff we may never know.

    https://www.cnet.com/news/astronomer...et-explain-it/

    I can't remember the school, but there is an entire wing of the physics department "looking for glitches" in order to either prove or disprove the computer simulation theory.

    That is how seriously the physicists take the argument nowadays. It goes back to the double slit experiment, why would a wave care about someone measuring it? Why would a quantum leap at all? (I know I put that wrong, why would an electron "leap" from specified states and never in between? Why can we not measure the speed and location of an electron at the same time?

    There are so many "shortcuts" within the extremes of nature that it is really hard to not at least consider that they DO look like the shortcuts one would put in to a video representation.

    I could envision a scenario where the "stars in the sky" are just digital lights until someone looks directly at them and the program then makes them "real."

    You can take that right down the level of you being the only player in this simulation and that all of us are unthinking zombies, to make the simulation real, and you live 100 years (I hope you do) and then awake and realize you've been in the simulation one hour from when you started, in the year 3500. You learned a lot of lessons, though.


    Who knows?

    It helped me spiritually, a lot. Because if we are a simulation, then whoever created it really invested a lot of time into "God" and "Jesus" and "ethics" and all that.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  17. #492
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    If you have the 15 minutes, this is fascinating and extremely easy to follow, an explanation as to why the LIGO experiment and slamming black holes, near proved that there are no larger 4-11 dimensions. String theory may be okay - for now, as they say - bc string theory presumes tiny ripples as 4-11 dimensions.


    But, this is worth it if you have the time. It is amazing:


    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DixieZag View Post
    If you have the 15 minutes, this is fascinating and extremely easy to follow, an explanation as to why the LIGO experiment and slamming black holes, near proved that there are no larger 4-11 dimensions. String theory may be okay - for now, as they say - bc string theory presumes tiny ripples as 4-11 dimensions.


    But, this is worth it if you have the time. It is amazing:


    Interesting. It's just as important to rule out what isn't as it is to discover new things. I don't pretend to understand the esoteric nature of the science, but trying to find alternate universes/dimensions seems a bit much to me. Even the Fifth Dimension with their "Age of Aquarious" was off the rails for me.

    Your affinity for a simulation borders on Calvinism and predestination. That makes me very uncomfortable. I'm a free will guy. It's really up to us to choose our path. I don't care for someone or some entity creating a computer program to control our destiny as human beings with souls.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Markburn1 View Post
    Interesting. It's just as important to rule out what isn't as it is to discover new things. I don't pretend to understand the esoteric nature of the science, but trying to find alternate universes/dimensions seems a bit much to me. Even the Fifth Dimension with their "Age of Aquarious" was off the rails for me.

    Your affinity for a simulation borders on Calvinism and predestination. That makes me very uncomfortable. I'm a free will guy. It's really up to us to choose our path. I don't care for someone or some entity creating a computer program to control our destiny as human beings with souls.
    To the extent I believe a simulation is possible, I believe that the program is sophisticated enough to give you self awareness, and thus free will, the program encourages free will, and the programmer is someone who cares about the fact you have a soul.

    After all, isn't that what the program promised?
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DixieZag View Post
    To the extent I believe a simulation is possible, I believe that the program is sophisticated enough to give you self awareness, and thus free will, the program encourages free will, and the programmer is someone who cares about the fact you have a soul.

    After all, isn't that what the program promised?
    So, if there is a "program" that would indicate there is something outside the program. If you win the game, i.e. satisfy the program is the reward another program called heaven? And if you screw up inside the program is the resulting program hell?

    I just don't think God interferes in everyday life like someone controlling a video game. I'd rather just converse with Him and have Him be my friend. I'm comfortable that He is the Creator and I get where you correlate that to a program but your version is way too cold for me.

  21. #496
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    Quote Originally Posted by Markburn1 View Post
    So, if there is a "program" that would indicate there is something outside the program. If you win the game, i.e. satisfy the program is the reward another program called heaven? And if you screw up inside the program is the resulting program hell?

    I just don't think God interferes in everyday life like someone controlling a video game. I'd rather just converse with Him and have Him be my friend. I'm comfortable that He is the Creator and I get where you correlate that to a program but your version is way too cold for me.
    Well, it is fun to discuss, but I assure you, the way I envision it, there was nothing cold about it, ever lasting life?

    Jesus talked a great deal about material things not mattering in the least - where do material things matter less than when one is a character walking through life? The soul, however, would be invaluable, as the only thing that is really "you".

    But, fun to discuss.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

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    I recall hearing of a physicist who was able to reconcile quantum physics with classic physics by theorizing that the universe is a holographic projection.

    It bears repeating that we are on the cusp of understanding things about our physical universe that are simply amazing.

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  23. #498
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    Quote Originally Posted by billyberu View Post
    I recall hearing of a physicist who was able to reconcile quantum physics with classic physics by theorizing that the universe is a holographic projection.

    It bears repeating that we are on the cusp of understanding things about our physical universe that are simply amazing.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
    Leonard Susskind is famous for being one of the first to find the holographic principle. That comes from marrying QM and General relativity around a black hole, and the information paradox.

    I don't understand it. But I don't think he claimed to marry QM and Newtonian, it was more just a way of linking GR and QM in some ways.

    The "theory of everything" that Einstein pursued, and everyone since, is the object of String Theory, which looks great in math, but has a real difficult time being proven. the LHC hasn't found super-symmetry, which is a big blow to string theorists.

    Susskind is a great guy to listen to, Jewish New Yorker out in California, he was one of 3 co-inventors of String Theory, then he left it, solved the holographic principle, and is now into quantum computing at age 78.

    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

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