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Thread: General Science Thread

  1. #201
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    Fun for top of page. https://www.sciencenews.org/article/...-debris?tgt=nr

    Castaway critters rafted to U.S. shores aboard Japan tsunami debris




    The 2011 tsunami that devastated Japan’s coast cast an enormous amount of debris out to sea — way out. Japanese marine life took advantage of the new floating real estate and booked a one-way trip to America. From 2012 to 2017, at least 289 living Japanese marine species washed up on the shores of North America and Hawaii, hitching rides on fishing boats, docks, buoys, crates and other nonbiodegradable objects, a team of U.S. researchers report in the Sept. 29 Science.
    Organisms that surprisingly survived the harsh 7,000-kilometer journey across the Pacific Ocean on 634 items of tsunami debris ranged from 52-centimeter-long fish (a Western Pacific yellowtail amberjack) to microscopic single-celled protists. About 65 percent of the species have never been seen in North America’s Pacific waters. If these newcomers become established, they have the potential to become invasive, disrupting native marine habitats, says study coauthor James Carlton, a marine scientist at Williams College in Mystic, Conn.


    The Northern Pacific sea star (Asterias amurensis) is among the world’s most invasive species. Though this purple and yellow sea star is normally found in shallow habitats, it can live as deep as 200 meters.

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    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
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  2. #202
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    Another enigma of the world of the small, quantum mechanics small.

    I was shocked to read this:

    Electrons are indeed far away from the nucleus! If we could magnify the simplest hydrogen atom so that its nucleus (a proton) were the size of a basketball, then its lone electron would be found about 2 miles away. All of the space in between the electron and the basketball-size nucleus is empty!
    Even with quadrillions of atoms making up your desk, those supposed "particles" are still fundamentally mostly "empty space" that all that "empty space" shouldn't be able to make a "thing" upon which you can rest your papers. And yet it does.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
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  3. #203
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    Interesting.

    The world of the small still is an enigma, but i found an article from 2014, that at least has a theory that at least pulls quantum mechanics back from that "spooky" world Einstein hated. However, given it was written in 2014 and we have yet to hear that quantum mechanics has been overtaken with a new model, likely means it hasn't had much success. Still interesting ....to some of us. https://www.wired.com/2014/06/the-new-quantum-reality/

    This idea that nature is inherently probabilistic — that particles have no hard properties, only likelihoods, until they are observed — is directly implied by the standard equations of quantum mechanics. But now a set of surprising experiments with fluids has revived old skepticism about that worldview. The bizarre results are fueling interest in an almost forgotten version of quantum mechanics, one that never gave up the idea of a single, concrete reality.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  4. #204
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    Perhaps, with a variation of the cryo-electron microscope, they will soon be able to look at those molecules you speak of Dixie!

    Cryo-electron microscopy changes all of this. Researchers can now freeze biomolecules mid-movement and visualise processes they have never previously seen, which is decisive for both the basic understanding of life’s chemistry and for the development of pharmaceuticals.

    https://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_pri...017/press.html
    Hoping you have a sense of humor too!

  5. #205
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    Blue Origin CEO: We're taking tourists to space within 18 months

    http://www.kxly.com/news/money/blue-...nths/632621265
    Hoping you have a sense of humor too!

  6. #206
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    Great stuff, will -but I'll believe that 18 month claim by Blue Origin when I see it.

    Thx for contributing.

    All are encouraged.

    Especially the real scientists around here.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  7. #207
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    Quote Originally Posted by DixieZag View Post
    Great stuff, will -but I'll believe that 18 month claim by Blue Origin when I see it.

    Thx for contributing.

    All are encouraged.

    Especially the real scientists around here.
    I didn't mean to imply that I believed it, but my wife asked 'How much? I wanna go!"

    If you get the chance, we will be at the Spokane Renaissance Faire this weekend, in Colbert, a few miles north of Cat tails.
    Hoping you have a sense of humor too!

  8. #208
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    We are all going to die: http://www.express.co.uk/news/scienc...lcano-eruption



    Yellowstone Volcano: Record earthquake levels at supervolcano sparking fears it will BLOW


    THE area surrounding the deadly Yellowstone supervolcano has experienced one of the biggest recorded periods of seismic activity, sparking fears that it could release a devastating eruption.

    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  9. #209
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    Actually, it's worse. http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2...ought-science/


    Yellowstone Supervolcano May Rumble to Life Faster Than Thought



    If the supervolcano underneath Yellowstone erupts again, we may have far less advance warning time than we thought.

    After analyzing minerals in fossilized ash from the most recent mega-eruption, researchers at Arizona State University think the supervolcano last woke up after two influxes of fresh magma flowed into the reservoir below the caldera.

    And in an unsettling twist, the minerals revealed that the critical changes in temperature and composition built up in a matter of decades. Until now, geologists had thought it would take centuries for the supervolcano to make that transition.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  10. #210
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    If you need further proof something very bad is happening in Yellowstone .... http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/weird-n...zaggs-11326474

    'UFO' emerged from behind hill and zigzagged across the skies over a supervolcano in eerie CCTV



    The video was filmed on June 9 but was only recently uploaded to YouTube, according to Fox News .

    Yellowstone is a nearly 3,500-square mile national park atop a volcanic wilderness and has become a hot spot for UFO sightings.
    I have been assured that Fox is a reputable and reliable news source, so .....

    As I said, we're all going to die. And they beady-eyes are going to watch.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  11. #211
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    So, I am heartened by the fact that 300 of you have seen that Yellowstone may go at any minute, and that is of interest to my space brothers, and yet no one commenting on the horror of it all.

    And then I thought, "maybe it's bc they assured that the beady-eyes clearly got the situation under control. They are not spectators to the end of North America, but rather technicians, ensuring that it continues to be the coolest park around.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  12. #212
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    I didn't read it in order, and when I saw references to people watching with "beady eyes" I thought you were talking about scientists. Not all scientists look like Professor Honeydew....some do, but not all. Then I saw you were actually talking about aliens.

    I would like to see Yellowstone by day before the big ka-boom.

  13. #213
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    Quote Originally Posted by DixieZag View Post
    So, I am heartened by the fact that 300 of you have seen that Yellowstone may go at any minute, and that is of interest to my space brothers, and yet no one commenting on the horror of it all.

    And then I thought, "maybe it's bc they assured that the beady-eyes clearly got the situation under control. They are not spectators to the end of North America, but rather technicians, ensuring that it continues to be the coolest park around.
    I can't afford to drink that much!

    When they were having the Soviet going to attack in the mid 1980's, whenever the alarm went off, I went to the bar and ran a tab. At the end of the day I had to pay it, we hadn't been annihilated.

    Yellowstone blowing is much the same. I can't do anything about it and can't prepare (other than end of the world scenarios), and I sure can't sit in a bar and run a tab day afetr day, so I just ignore it. It's an interesting topic, I just hope we don't see it!
    Hoping you have a sense of humor too!

  14. #214
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    Oh, I have a sense of humor.

    One thing I wonder. If geologists, or astronomers, saw something that would wipe out significant numbers, or all numbers (other than maybe those in the know deep underground with 10 years of supplies (of which we have some) would survive, would they tell the public. I doubt it, and that's likely a good policy.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

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    Two stars crash into each other, wobbling the universe and flinging out huge amounts of gold
    The discovery opens a 'new chapter in astrophysics', say experts, and has been described as one of the most exciting ever.
    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/sc...-a8003146.html

    Worth a look...

    Scientists have observed two stars slamming into each other deep in space, sending out huge amounts of gold in an alchemical explosion.

    The super-dense stars crashed together 130 million light years away, spewing out precious metals and other heavy elements like platinum and uranium – and experts say the event has kickstarted a "new chapter in astrophysics" and confirmed theories about the origin of the mysterious neutron stars.

    The huge explosion rocked the fabric of the universe, distorting spacetime. That is a major discovery in itself, marking only the fifth time that gravitational waves have been spotted on Earth.
    "The Foo is the most extraordinary collection of talent, of human knowledge, that has ever been gathered together on one message board with the possible exception of when Thomas Jefferson blogged alone." JFK -4.29.62-

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  17. #217
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martin Centre Mad Man View Post
    That was cool.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  18. #218
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    Hoping you have a sense of humor too!

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    Ha! For some random reason, reminds me of an article I read in The Onion:https://www.theonion.com/looking-bac...s-t-1819584954

    Looking Back On My Life, I Guess My Biggest Regret Is Trying To Fight That Alligator 5 Minutes Ago

    As I reach the end of my life, it’s hard for me not to look back on all the years that have passed and think of what might have been. Frankly, there are a lot of things I wish I had done differently. But when I consider all the paths my life has taken and those that it hasn’t, I would have to say that my greatest regret is probably trying to fight that alligator five minutes ago.

    I’ve made my share of mistakes throughout my life, but scaling that concrete barrier in order to wrestle the largest alligator in the enclosure is probably the one I’d most like to take back.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  20. #220
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    We revisit the solar system's second most interesting moon, Enceladus.

    A sandy core may have kept Enceladus’ ocean warm




    A soft heart keeps Enceladus warm from the inside. Friction within its porous core could help Saturn’s icy moon maintain a liquid ocean for billions of years and explain why it sprays plumes from its south pole, astronomers report November 6 in Nature Astronomy.

    The team made computer simulations of water circulating through the spongey core using data from the Cassini spacecraft and geoengineering experiments with sand and gravel on Earth. They found that, depending on the core’s makeup, the ocean should get enough heat to stay liquid for tens of millions to billions of years.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  21. #221
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    TEN STRANGE FACTS ABOUT OUR MOON



    1. Moon's Age: The moon is far older than previously expected. Maybe even older than the Earth or the Sun. The oldest age for the Earth is estimated to be 4.6 billion years old; moon rocks were dated at 5.3 billion years old, and the dust upon which they were resting was at least another billion years older.


    2. Rock's Origin: The chemical composition of the dust upon which the rocks sat differed remarkably from the rocks themselves, contrary to accepted theories that the dust resulted from weathering and breakup of the rocks themselves. The rocks had to have come from somewhere else.


    3. Heavier Elements on Surface: Normal planetary composition results in heavier elements in the core and lighter materials at the surface; not so with the moon.

    According to Wilson,

    "The abundance of refractory elements like titanium in the surface areas is so pronounced that several geologists proposed the refractory compounds were brought to the moon's surface in great quantity in some unknown way. They don't know how, but that it was done cannot be questioned."

    4. Water Vapor: On March 7, 1971, lunar instruments placed by the astronauts recorded a vapor cloud of water passing across the surface of the moon. The cloud lasted 14 hours and covered an area of about 100 square miles.


    5. Magnetic Rocks: Moon rocks were magnetized. This is odd because there is no magnetic field on the moon itself. This could not have originated from a "close call" with Earth - such an encounter would have ripped the moon apart.


    6. No Volcanoes: Some of the moon's craters originated internally, yet there is no indication that the moon was ever hot enough to produce volcanic eruptions.


    7. Moon Mascons:
    Mascons, which are large, dense, circular masses lying twenty to forty miles beneath the centers of the moon's maria, "are broad, disk-shaped objects that could be possibly some kind of artificial construction. For huge circular disks are not likely to be beneath each huge maria, centered like bull's-eyes in the middle of each, by coincidence or accident."

    8. Seismic Activity: Hundreds of "moonquakes" are recorded each year that cannot be attributed to meteor strikes. In November, 1958, Soviet astronomer Nikolay A. Kozyrev of the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory photographed a gaseous eruption of the moon near the crater Alphonsus. He also detected a reddish glow that lasted for about an hour.

    In 1963, astronomers at the Lowell Observatory also saw reddish glows on the crests of ridges in the Aristarchus region. These observations have proved to be precisely identical and periodical, repeating themselves as the moon moves closer to the Earth. These are probably not natural phenomena.


    9. Hollow Moon: The moon's mean density is 3.34 gm/cm3 (3.34 times an equal volume of water) whereas the Earth's is 5.5. What does this mean?

    In 1962, NASA scientist Dr. Gordon MacDonald stated,

    "If the astronomical data are reduced, it is found that the data require that the interior of the moon is more like a hollow than a homogeneous sphere."

    Nobel chemist Dr. Harold Urey suggested the moon's reduced density is because of large areas inside the moon where is "simply a cavity."

    MIT's Dr. Sean C. Solomon wrote,

    "the Lunar Orbiter experiments vastly improved our knowledge of the moon's gravitational field... indicating the frightening possibility that the moon might be hollow."

    In Carl Sagan's treatise, Intelligent Life in the Universe, the famous astronomer stated, "A natural satellite cannot be a hollow object."


    10 Moon Echoes: On November 20, 1969, the Apollo 12 crew jettisoned the lunar module ascent stage causing it to crash onto the moon. The LM's impact (about 40 miles from the Apollo 12 landing site) created an artificial moonquake with startling characteristics - the moon reverberated like a bell for more than an hour.

    And some "unsettling" bonus facts:

    Moon Diameter: How does one explain the "coincidence" that the moon is just the right distance, coupled with just the right diameter, to completely cover the sun during an eclipse?

    Again, Isaac Asimov responds,

    "There is no astronomical reason why the moon and the sun should fit so well. It is the sheerest of coincidences, and only the Earth among all the planets is blessed in this fashion."

    Weird Orbit
    : Our moon is the only moon in the solar system that has a stationary, near-perfect circular orbit.

    Stranger still, the moon's center of mass is about 6000 feet closer to the Earth than its geometric center (which should cause wobbling), but the moon's bulge is on the far side of the moon, away from the Earth.

    "Something" had to put the moon in orbit with its precise altitude, course, and speed
    .

    Just fun to ponder
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  22. #222
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    So I'd never heard of this creature until my newly turned 4 year old informed me of their existence...thank you PBS.
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tardigrade

  23. #223
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzgirl_127 View Post
    So I'd never heard of this creature until my newly turned 4 year old informed me of their existence...thank you PBS.
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tardigrade
    Was a big part of the new Star Trek Discovery tv show. Good stuff!


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  24. #224
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    First known depiction of human hunters with leashed dogs seems to date back at least 8,000 years:

    The engravings likely date back more than 8000 years, making them the earliest depictions of dogs, a new study reveals. And those lines are probably leashes, suggesting that humans mastered the art of training and controlling dogs thousands of years earlier than previously thought
    .



    “It’s truly astounding stuff,” says Melinda Zeder, an archaeozoologist at the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C. “It’s the only real demonstration we have of humans using early dogs to hunt.” But she cautions that more work will be needed to confirm both the age and meaning of the depictions.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  25. #225
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    Quote Originally Posted by DixieZag View Post
    First known depiction of human hunters with leashed dogs seems to date back at least 8,000 years:

    .

    I'm going to guess that the artist was also that hunter because, uhm...

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