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Thread: any other hikers here?

  1. #576
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    I just finished up a vacation out in Colorado and Wyoming. We had a family reunion at Estes Park and then went into WY to show my daughters around my old haunts. My Mom’s family is from Wyoming and I went to Grad school in Laramie.

    We had a good hike in the Rocky Mountain National Park, went first up the very crowded Emerald Lake trail and then came out on the Glacier Knob Loop which was considerably less traveled.

    I wanted to take my girls up into the Snowy Range up Medicne Bow Peak outside Laramie while we were there. I did a lot of hiking and skiing up there as a kid and in grad school. We drove up, but couldn’t even get to the trailhead because the road was still snowed in. We parked on the highway and hiked back to the trailhead. We had to wind our way over snow drifts to get around a lake at the base of the trail only to find the bridge over the outlet was under water due to the lake being swollen with snow runoff. I found a boulder field that forded the outlet so we made our way back up to the trail only to find it drifted under snow. I started breaking through the snow, “post holing” up to my thigh. I finally got a view of the peak and our entire route was still snow covered. It then proceeded to start raining pretty heavily on us, so we headed back.

    We did hike around some lakes at the base of the peak for a while and could see tracks where people were still skiing some of the chutes just below the peak. It was still very much early spring up there.
    'I found it is the small everyday deeds of ordinary folk that keep the darkness at bay… small acts of kindness and love.'
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  2. #577
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    Quote Originally Posted by kitzbuel View Post
    I just finished up a vacation out in Colorado and Wyoming. We had a family reunion at Estes Park and then went into WY to show my daughters around my old haunts. My Mom’s family is from Wyoming and I went to Grad school in Laramie.

    We had a good hike in the Rocky Mountain National Park, went first up the very crowded Emerald Lake trail and then came out on the Glacier Knob Loop which was considerably less traveled.

    I wanted to take my girls up into the Snowy Range up Medicne Bow Peak outside Laramie while we were there. I did a lot of hiking and skiing up there as a kid and in grad school. We drove up, but couldn’t even get to the trailhead because the road was still snowed in. We parked on the highway and hiked back to the trailhead. We had to wind our way over snow drifts to get around a lake at the base of the trail only to find the bridge over the outlet was under water due to the lake being swollen with snow runoff. I found a boulder field that forded the outlet so we made our way back up to the trail only to find it drifted under snow. I started breaking through the snow, “post holing” up to my thigh. I finally got a view of the peak and our entire route was still snow covered. It then proceeded to start raining pretty heavily on us, so we headed back.

    We did hike around some lakes at the base of the peak for a while and could see tracks where people were still skiing some of the chutes just below the peak. It was still very much early spring up there.
    Wow, that sounds awesome and miserable!
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  3. #578
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    Quote Originally Posted by seacatfan View Post
    Here's a link w/ pictures for my backpacking trip:

    http://www.nwhikers.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=8030124
    Great Pictures!
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  4. #579
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    My brother-in-law and I left for Snowgrass Flat on Friday morning. The weather was perfect. We made it to our camp around 1 and setup. The goal was to climb Old Snowy and follow the ridge to Ives Peak on Friday and then climb Gilbert Peak on Saturday. My brother-in-law was worn out. He had done a very difficult climb the week before and was still recovering. We decided to push Old Snowy and Ives Peak to Saturday and skip Gilbert Peak. While he took a nap I wandered around the area. It was so beautiful. Wildflowers were blooming and Mount Adams was crystal clear.





    The weather changed overnight. It was windy and very foggy when we woke up. As we were getting ready for the day and eating breakfast it started to lightly rain. The rain and wind continued even though we kept getting brief moments when it seemed like the sun would break through. Even though it was rainy and windy the hike up Old Snowy was still fun. It was very windy and cold at the top. I was surprised to see two people in sleeping bags near the top, but I'm sure it was pretty awesome the day before. We decided to not continue to Ives because of the lack of visibility.



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  5. #580
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    Mountain weather sure can change in a hurry. Glad you got to enjoy blue skies for part of your trip. Old Snowy is a good outing, close to 8000' w/out being technical at all.

  6. #581
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    I injured my shoulder mountain biking a couple weeks ago. It still hurts, but has been getting better. I have been itching to do something active. I went for a run on Friday and I felt pretty good. My daughter and I went to attempt Shriner Peak again (I tried it earlier in the year and was turned around by snow). Her little legs were starting to complain so I convinced her to keep going to where I thought there was a good place to eat lunch. Boy was it a great place to eat lunch. We had a beautiful view of Rainier while we ate and she got a nice reward for pushing herself a little further.

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  7. #582
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    Nice gu03. I haven't gotten out for a while either, til today. On short notice I joined a buddy for a long loop day hike in Olympic National Park. I'd done it once before. I was a bit worried because I'm not in the best shape this year, but it was okay. Saw 6 bears! I've never seen anywhere near that many in a single day. None were real close. They are very busy eating, getting ready for hibernation. I'm assuming they were feasting on the blueberries that are all around up there.

  8. #583
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    The Yakamas say that when you can see the horse on Pahto (Mount Adams)....the berries are ready …… had a bear in my front yard last week after the berries....there is a hint of Fall in the air...cool mornings and warm afternoons...my favorite season....

  9. #584
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    Quote Originally Posted by bartruff1 View Post
    there is a hint of Fall in the air...cool mornings and warm afternoons...my favorite season....
    Me too. There was a bit of red and yellow on some of the various plants and trees yesterday.

  10. #585
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    For some reason there are very few Yellowjackets this year ???? It might have something to do with the severe cold and deep snow we had in Eastern Washington in Feb...…

    I was able to boat some 50 miles on the Columbia this morning and saw one other person... a young lady in a home made kayak who was traveling the entire Columbia from Canal Flats to the " Ocian in View " as Clark exclaimed .....(wrongly) ...in any case...... she hopes to reach the Pacific in Oct...

  11. #586
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    I went hiking last Friday to Granite Lakes. I took my dad, my brother, and my brother's wife. It was cold and wet. Sometimes it rained harder than others. One nice thing about the rain is that there was not many people on the hike given this is a hike that I think is very popular. Trail was in good shape considering all of the rain, but we did have to cross a lot of creeks.

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  12. #587
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    Quote Originally Posted by bartruff1 View Post
    For some reason there are very few Yellowjackets this year ???? It might have something to do with the severe cold and deep snow we had in Eastern Washington in Feb...…

    I was able to boat some 50 miles on the Columbia this morning and saw one other person... a young lady in a home made kayak who was traveling the entire Columbia from Canal Flats to the " Ocian in View " as Clark exclaimed .....(wrongly) ...in any case...... she hopes to reach the Pacific in Oct...
    Wow, that's crazy!
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  13. #588
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    O3...when we were planning the Alpine Lakes Wilderness we got a hand written letter from a very very VIP that you and your dad know....

    suggesting that there should be a trail along the Columbia from start to finish...

    that was beyond the scope of the plan..... but IMHO a much better idea than the Pacific Crest Trail across Washington.....it would be available year round and would have easy access to lodging and meals...... and would not be a highway thru the Wilderness for horses and trail runners.... and would probably…... eliminate the need to rescue damn fools with helicopters....and they could get their participation trophy...

  14. #589
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    Well bart I didn't complete the entire length of the Columbia, but I was on a rocky promontory about 1600 ft. above the river today. House sitting for my parents so I'm down near Portland. Wahkeena Falls to Angels Rest, nice moderate hike. Some of it burned during the Eagle Creek fire 2 years ago. Other than some blackened trees you can't even tell anymore. The underbrush has grown back with a vengeance. I don't know if it has something to do w/ dead or weakened trees but I don't think I've ever seen so many woodpeckers before. The little ones, I can't tell the difference between hairy or downy. After several days of rotten weather down this way, I wasn't the only person out enjoying a bit of sunshine.

  15. #590
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    I sampled a couple of Wilderness Areas close to where I grew up that I never previously visited--Salmon-Huckleberry and Badger Creek. I wasn't exactly blown away by either. Oh well, good to try something different sometimes. I did witness a raven party today, 11 of them flew by within a few moments. That's pretty rare, they are usually seen solo or in pairs. Later on I saw one vigorously encouraging some kind of raptor to leave the area. Also got a little peep show of 4 gray jays (I flat out refuse to start calling them Canada jays, I don't care what ornithologists think) taking a bath in a muddle puddle formed by tire ruts. Got serenaded by chickadees and red breasted nuthatches off and on all day. Those 2 border Mt. Hood to the south and east, I think next time I'll just stick to something on the shoulder of Hood.

  16. #591
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    Last Friday I went in search of Larches. I was going to go way up north, but the forecast called for heavy snow. I decided to drive to Teannaway and hike up to Ingalls Lake. Throughout the hike the weather went like this cloudy and cold > light rain > rain stopped, got windy > light snow for a while > after the snow for the last few miles of my hike the sun came out for the first time. I think the larches had just turned as some of them were not quite full yellow yet. I can see why the hike is so popular. It is a very pretty hike and the lake is really cool.







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  17. #592
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    Quote Originally Posted by bartruff1 View Post
    O3...when we were planning the Alpine Lakes Wilderness we got a hand written letter from a very very VIP that you and your dad know....

    suggesting that there should be a trail along the Columbia from start to finish...

    that was beyond the scope of the plan..... but IMHO a much better idea than the Pacific Crest Trail across Washington.....it would be available year round and would have easy access to lodging and meals...... and would not be a highway thru the Wilderness for horses and trail runners.... and would probably…... eliminate the need to rescue damn fools with helicopters....and they could get their participation trophy...

    I like the PCT, but I'm sure you have good reasons why you don't. I would enjoy a trail along the Columbia River though I think large stretches of it might be kind of boring.
    Bring back the OCC

  18. #593
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    Quote Originally Posted by seacatfan View Post
    I sampled a couple of Wilderness Areas close to where I grew up that I never previously visited--Salmon-Huckleberry and Badger Creek. I wasn't exactly blown away by either. Oh well, good to try something different sometimes. I did witness a raven party today, 11 of them flew by within a few moments. That's pretty rare, they are usually seen solo or in pairs. Later on I saw one vigorously encouraging some kind of raptor to leave the area. Also got a little peep show of 4 gray jays (I flat out refuse to start calling them Canada jays, I don't care what ornithologists think) taking a bath in a muddle puddle formed by tire ruts. Got serenaded by chickadees and red breasted nuthatches off and on all day. Those 2 border Mt. Hood to the south and east, I think next time I'll just stick to something on the shoulder of Hood.
    I have never seen more than one raven at a time. That is awesome! It sounds like you had a great day of bird watching. I think it's funny that the gray jay is the Canadian national bird. Why would you pick something nicknamed camp robber as a national bird?
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  19. #594
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    Quote Originally Posted by gu03alum View Post
    I have never seen more than one raven at a time. That is awesome! It sounds like you had a great day of bird watching. I think it's funny that the gray jay is the Canadian national bird. Why would you pick something nicknamed camp robber as a national bird?
    Ha ha. Hey our bald eagles are renowned thieves and bullies, they often steal food from other birds. I guess that's the perks of being the biggest and baddest. Although I've seen some pretty cool footage of eagles and great blue herons in the same hunting grounds, some GBH's don't play and won't back down from anybody.

  20. #595
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    That's cool you got up to Ingalls Lake gu03. That is a beautiful hike. I haven't been up there for a while but I love that one.


    I got in one more hike near Mt. Hood before I headed back north again. Perfect weather day too. I've been to Lost Lake many times, pass by a sign for Wahtum Lake on the way and I've always been curious about it (stop reading now bart because it's along the PCT) but never been there. Finally made it. Long, winding road to get there, some great fall colors. The lake is pretty, fairly generic, surrounded by woods. There is a pleasant 4 mile loop around the lake. Although it's not blooming now most of the loop the forest floor is absolutely covered by beargrass. That must be sweet around June or so. The kicker for the hike is the short, steep spur up to Chinidere Mountain. Great 360 view, really close to Hood, Jefferson further south, and to the north St. Helens, Rainier and Adams. There was something else barely poking up even further south, probably North Sister. So I think it's a 6 volcano view. Also a really good vantage of the Eagle Creek drainage demonstrating just how bad the damage from the fire was. Almost 100% of the trees in that valley/canyon are dead. The parallel drainages are hit and miss w/ fire damage but at ground zero it's just completely devastated. Amazing what one stupid teenager with a firecracker can do.

  21. #596
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    I attempted Shriner Peak for the 3rd time this year. Today I was finally successful. The first time I turned around a mile from the top because the snow was making it difficult to follow the trail and it was foggy and cloudy so no view would be had. The second time my daughter and I made it about 3 miles and she was done. We ate lunch with a great view of Rainier and then turned around. The weather couldn't have been better today. At the top, there is a fire lookout and views of Rainier, Adams, St Helens, and Goat Rocks. There were also two campsites at the top so I'm going to keep that in mind for next year. Only problem is there is not much water on the hike so I would need to carry a lot up. Honestly, this might be my favorite hike. There are hardly any other hikers all 3 times I went and the views are outstanding at the top. It's got good elevation gain (3400 feet) over 4.5 miles.







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  22. #597
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    Joined a buddy for a quick, early trip to Lake 22 on Saturday. Less than half a dozen cars when we arrived around 8. Drippy, cloudy day. I don't think it was really raining, but trees/brush were wet. Haven't done that trail in a while, always nice for a quick fix. Most of the leaves have fallen off the big trees, but some fall colors on display still--devils club, huckleberry, ferns, grasses. Mostly yellow and gold, not so much of the flashy red and orange, but still pretty. Only saw a few other parties on the way up, nobody as we looped around the lake, quite a bit more traffic heading up when we were returning to the trailhead. Back in time to watch the stinkin' Huskies blow a 2 touchdown lead against the Ducks. Oh, heard several pikas and saw one. I can never get over how cute those little critters are. The one we saw quickly bit thru a fern frond and then dragged it inside its den for a snack.

  23. #598
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    Quote Originally Posted by seacatfan View Post
    Joined a buddy for a quick, early trip to Lake 22 on Saturday. Less than half a dozen cars when we arrived around 8. Drippy, cloudy day. I don't think it was really raining, but trees/brush were wet. Haven't done that trail in a while, always nice for a quick fix. Most of the leaves have fallen off the big trees, but some fall colors on display still--devils club, huckleberry, ferns, grasses. Mostly yellow and gold, not so much of the flashy red and orange, but still pretty. Only saw a few other parties on the way up, nobody as we looped around the lake, quite a bit more traffic heading up when we were returning to the trailhead. Back in time to watch the stinkin' Huskies blow a 2 touchdown lead against the Ducks. Oh, heard several pikas and saw one. I can never get over how cute those little critters are. The one we saw quickly bit thru a fern frond and then dragged it inside its den for a snack.
    That sounds like a nice hike. I was thinking I might be done for the season, but will have to remember these lower elevation hikes. I think I don't really like hiking in the snow that much. It looks like Crystal got a ton of snow this weekend. Hopefully, I will be skiing in a few weeks.
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  24. #599
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    Finally dragged my lazy butt out for a hike. The sun came out today after several cloudy days. I'm with my parents, east of Portland. it was chilly this morning, around 20 degrees when I woke up. Creeping up to upper 30s by the time I started hiking. Picked something moderate, was about right for the day. Only a few miles further east to the trailhead. Did a loop starting at the Labyrinth, then over to the top of Coyote Wall and back down. Some nice views of Mt. Hood and the Columbia River. Lots of oak trees and yellow/gold grasses.

  25. #600
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    Quote Originally Posted by seacatfan View Post
    Finally dragged my lazy butt out for a hike. The sun came out today after several cloudy days. I'm with my parents, east of Portland. it was chilly this morning, around 20 degrees when I woke up. Creeping up to upper 30s by the time I started hiking. Picked something moderate, was about right for the day. Only a few miles further east to the trailhead. Did a loop starting at the Labyrinth, then over to the top of Coyote Wall and back down. Some nice views of Mt. Hood and the Columbia River. Lots of oak trees and yellow/gold grasses.
    That sounds awesome!
    Bring back the OCC

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