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Thread: any other hikers here?

  1. #1
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    Default any other hikers here?

    I thought of starting a thread about this before. Recently ran into 2 GU grads up high at a lookout in the North Cascades. Don't know how recently they graduated, but one just took the bar exam. They rowed crew while they were at GU.

    Anyway I'm about as passionate about hiking as I am college bball. Do it as much as I can, at least 6 months out of the year with less frequent forays during the middle of winter.

  2. #2
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    Love hiking and did loads of it when I lived in the PNW. I've done much less since I moved down here, for a few reasons. Any hike within reasonable driving distance is very crowded, the views are not nearly what they are up north(unless you like smog), and the absence of natural running water. I miss me some northwest hiking. The Sierras are very nice though, but it's. 6+ hour drive.
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  3. #3
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    I love hiking, particularly in Washington State. I don't have the time that I wish, but as often as I can fill the water bottles and lace up, I'm out in the sticks.

    Five stars!
    Once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right

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    I love my Washington Cascades, but the Sierras are great too. My brother was at Edwards AFB for several years, so while he was down there I flew down to visit a couple times and we drove north up 395 and backpacked several places. That got me hooked, so since he moved on I've road tripped down there 3 different times. Only scratched the surface though, there's a lot of ground to cover in the Sierras. A 6 hour drive would be fairly prohibitive for regular forays. Have you checked out the Trinity Alps at all? I've backpacked up two trails there, that's nice too. Kinda like a mini-Sierras. Actually reminds me a lot of some of the Alpine Lakes Wilderness in Washington.

  5. #5
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    Love hiking. Went up around Rainier on Saturday. Several weeks ago was hiking around Bavaria in the Alps, talk about amazing. The old culture and the spirit of hiking is a bit different than here in the northwest. Both have their advantages. There's nothing like hiking through some high mountain pasture with the sound of cowbells in the distance, or right beside you. Pretty awesome.
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  6. #6
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    It is yellow jacket season on the trails..

  7. #7
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    My cousin has summited all the Cascades major peaks, most (all?) did not involve technical climbing so could be considered hikes. I walk my dogs 1-1 1/2 miles everyday, but it's not enough. There are still people that tell me to "take a hike"! How do they know?
    Hoping you have a sense of humor too!

  8. #8
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    Around Spokane, Mt. Spokane state park never disappoints if one just wants a quick "Let's get out of here."

    Favorite place ever is Sawtooth National Rec Area, between lake Alturus and Redfish lake in Idaho. Part wilderness area, so check before about rules, but big parts are just recreation area and rules about people on trails are not a worry.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
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  9. #9
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    Happy times picking huckleberries at the top of Schweitzer yesterday in pristine sunshine.

    Once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right

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    It is not a good idea to tell people about the Sun Valley, Stanley, Challis, Salmon, Sawtooth National Recreation Area......better they should go to the Owyhee,,,

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    Quote Originally Posted by bartruff1 View Post
    It is not a good idea to tell people about the Sun Valley, Stanley, Challis, Salmon, Sawtooth National Recreation Area......better they should go to the Owyhee,,,
    The Owhyee mountains and the northern Nevada mountains around Jarbidge are very much under appreciated, far more room to roam up there than most would guess and it's definitely off the beaten path. Still, the SNRA has plenty of open space if one is willing to pack in for a bit and stay off the well-known day hikes like Independence Day Creek. Beautiful area, was going to be the "third" original national park with Yellowstone and Yosemite but Idaho's delegation blocked it - smart, I think, except it had as much to do with keeping ranching there than keeping it hidden.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  12. #12
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    I love hiking and try to get out as often as possible. I hiked to the top of Mount Ellinor in the Olympics last Saturday. I took my daughter and my wife. They were not happy with me as it is a very steep hike. I ended up carrying my daughter a lot. We got to the false summit and I left them to rest while I finished the hike. I enjoyed a summit beer at the top.



    I had planned on doing the skyline trail on Mount Rainier on Monday with my wife and daughter, but they were done with hiking for a little while.

    My cousin and I are planning on hiking to the top of Mount Stuart in October. Have any of you been?
    Bring back the OCC

  13. #13
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    Back in July my cousin and I hiked up to the Kendall Katwalk, but on the way we did a short scramble to the top of Kendall Peak. This is me at the top.



    After that we came back and finished the hike to the Kendall Katwalk. That was really cool too.

    Bring back the OCC

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by gu03alum View Post
    I love hiking and try to get out as often as possible. I hiked to the top of Mount Ellinor in the Olympics last Saturday. I took my daughter and my wife. They were not happy with me as it is a very steep hike. I ended up carrying my daughter a lot. We got to the false summit and I left them to rest while I finished the hike. I enjoyed a summit beer at the top.


    I had planned on doing the skyline trail on Mount Rainier on Monday with my wife and daughter, but they were done with hiking for a little while.

    My cousin and I are planning on hiking to the top of Mount Stuart in October. Have any of you been?
    We did the Skyline Trail on Saturday (NPS birthday, so free entry - added bonus). Tons of people, but thinned out the farther you got from Paradise. Got their early and the mountain was clear, when we left it was completely covered. Beautiful day though for hiking.
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    Quote Originally Posted by SWZag View Post
    We did the Skyline Trail on Saturday (NPS birthday, so free entry - added bonus). Tons of people, but thinned out the farther you got from Paradise. Got their early and the mountain was clear, when we left it was completely covered. Beautiful day though for hiking.
    Were you able to go across the snow field or did you go up and around it?
    Bring back the OCC

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    Mt Stuart (in the Alpine Lakes Wilderness) is not a hike....it is a climb and in Oct the weather is dangerous.... I do not know what the current permit system is, but they can give you all that info at the Leavenworth Ranger Station....

    I have never climbed Stuart, but I have been in the Enchantments from both Snow Lakes and Assgard Pass.....

    You might get a copy of Fred Beckey's Alpine Guide....the south side is different from the north side and rock fall is a problem when the snow is gone..

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    I've climbed Stuart. Are you going via Cascadian Couloir on the south side? Much of the couloir is loose dirt and kinda tedious. Gets more fun higher up on the mountain. Multiple options toward the end. I think all involve a little bit of scrambling (at least class 2 or 3), but if you take the wrong line you can definitely get into class 4 or 5 terrain.

  18. #18
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    I love the Sawtooths. Done a few trips over there, some day hikes and some backpacking. While some of the trails are somewhat popular, it's all relative. They certainly aren't anything like popular trails near Seattle. I don't think the Sawtooths are in much danger of becoming completely overrun. People from afar are more drawn to the national parks in Wyoming and Montana if they are visiting the Northern Rockies, and there just isn't a large population near enough the Sawtooths to be a huge problem.

    The Seven Devils and Bighorn Crags are other cool areas in Idaho I've checked out at least a little bit.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by seacatfan View Post
    I love the Sawtooths. Done a few trips over there, some day hikes and some backpacking. While some of the trails are somewhat popular, it's all relative. They certainly aren't anything like popular trails near Seattle. I don't think the Sawtooths are in much danger of becoming completely overrun. People from afar are more drawn to the national parks in Wyoming and Montana if they are visiting the Northern Rockies, and there just isn't a large population near enough the Sawtooths to be a huge problem.

    The Seven Devils and Bighorn Crags are other cool areas in Idaho I've checked out at least a little bit.
    Agree with above 100% re; SNRA. The view out from Galena summit on done to the Stanley Basin remains my number 1(a) of the most beautiful on earth 1(b) is the view over the Golden Gate with SF in the backdrop.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by bartruff1 View Post
    Mt Stuart (in the Alpine Lakes Wilderness) is not a hike....it is a climb and in Oct the weather is dangerous.... I do not know what the current permit system is, but they can give you all that info at the Leavenworth Ranger Station....

    I have never climbed Stuart, but I have been in the Enchantments from both Snow Lakes and Assgard Pass.....

    You might get a copy of Fred Beckey's Alpine Guide....the south side is different from the north side and rock fall is a problem when the snow is gone..
    I hiked through the enchantments when I was 18 or so. That was a beautiful hike.

    Quote Originally Posted by seacatfan View Post
    I've climbed Stuart. Are you going via Cascadian Couloir on the south side? Much of the couloir is loose dirt and kinda tedious. Gets more fun higher up on the mountain. Multiple options toward the end. I think all involve a little bit of scrambling (at least class 2 or 3), but if you take the wrong line you can definitely get into class 4 or 5 terrain.
    I think we are doing the southern route. I was told there would only be scramble and no climbing.
    Bring back the OCC

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    Back in the mid 80's I hiked thru the Enchantments with your old boss....Bob Gates.....long story...

    One place I always wanted to go is the Napeequa Valley north of Lake Wenatchee......I got close a couple times but never made it....has to be one of the wildest places in the Cascades...

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by DixieZag View Post
    The Owhyee mountains and the northern Nevada mountains around Jarbidge are very much under appreciated, far more room to roam up there than most would guess and it's definitely off the beaten path. Still, the SNRA has plenty of open space if one is willing to pack in for a bit and stay off the well-known day hikes like Independence Day Creek. Beautiful area, was going to be the "third" original national park with Yellowstone and Yosemite but Idaho's delegation blocked it - smart, I think, except it had as much to do with keeping ranching there than keeping it hidden.
    Ya Jarbridge....with any luck you will run into a Hungarian Partridge or a Bundy cousin....

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by bartruff1 View Post
    Back in the mid 80's I hiked thru the Enchantments with your old boss....Bob Gates.....long story...

    One place I always wanted to go is the Napeequa Valley north of Lake Wenatchee......I got close a couple times but never made it....has to be one of the wildest places in the Cascades...
    That sounds like a story worth telling.

    Napeequa Valley sounds bad ass LINK

    There’s a hidden valley in Washington’s Glacier Peak Wilderness that some have likened to Shangri-La, the fictional utopia of James Hilton’s novel Lost Horizon. Hilton’s Shangri-La was an earthly paradise … beautiful and nearly inaccessible to the outside world. Washington’s Shangri-La is the Napeequa River Valley. And perhaps the best place to look down on the Napeequa is from Little Giant Pass.

    To get the view, one of the finest of the Cascades, you gotta do some leg work first. Your first obstacle is just a few feet from the parking area—a bridgeless crossing of the Chiwawa River. You’re not a bird, so you must wade the river. September is a great time to cross, as the river is at its lowest flow of the year and shouldn’t be higher than knees or thighs, but always be on the lookout for water currents and depth. From there, the 5-mile trail to Little Giant Pass isn’t far, but it is a bit steep. In season, berry breaks help temper the work, and soon enough you’ll see it, the lovely Napeequa Valley. The long valley sprawls out beneath you … as deep as it is isolated, as lush and green as it is wild. The icy Clark Mountain, a peek at Glacier Peak, the steep walls of Chiwawa Ridge and the snaking course of the Napeequa River all help complete the visual explosion. It doesn’t get more idyllic than this, so sit back, drink in the view and imagine your own Shangri-La.
    Bring back the OCC

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by bartruff1 View Post
    Back in the mid 80's I hiked thru the Enchantments with your old boss....Bob Gates.....long story...

    One place I always wanted to go is the Napeequa Valley north of Lake Wenatchee......I got close a couple times but never made it....has to be one of the wildest places in the Cascades...
    The Napeequa looks beautiful from above. I've seen it from Little Giant Pass and right on the edge of the steep drop off to the valley beyond Triad Lake and High Pass. Haven't been down into the valley myself, like you.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by bartruff1 View Post
    Ya Jarbridge....with any luck you will run into a Hungarian Partridge or a Bundy cousin....
    Go about 25 miles south of there and it's all black helicopters and men in black these days. Actually, it always has been, or at least since the Chenowith golden era, circa 1998.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

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