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Thread: Mozilla CEO thrown out of his job...

  1. #1
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    Default Mozilla CEO thrown out of his job...

    ... because he supported Prop 8 with a private donation.

    As best I can tell, his personal opinion had little to nothing to do with how he did his job and he said as much in a blog posting after the controversy began.

    What say you, OCC'ers, is this a good thing?

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    Quote Originally Posted by former1dog View Post
    ... because he supported Prop 8 with a private donation.

    As best I can tell, his personal opinion had little to nothing to do with how he did his job and he said as much in a blog posting after the controversy began.

    What say you, OCC'ers, is this a good thing?

    Kinda bull####. Not worth firing the dude. May not agree with his viewpoint but he is allowed his own viewpoint.
    "And Morrison? He did what All-Americans do. He shot daggers in the daylight and stole a win." - Steve Kelley (Seattle Times)

    "Gonzaga is a special place, with special people!" - Dan Dickau #21

    Foo me once shame on you, Foo me twice shame on me.

    2012 Foostrodamus - Foothsayer of Death

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    Quote Originally Posted by LongIslandZagFan View Post
    Kinda bull####. Not worth firing the dude. May not agree with his viewpoint but he is allowed his own viewpoint.
    This pretty much sums it up.
    Go Zags!!!

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    It's probably unnecessary, but isn't this just the free market speaking?

    The Board saw that he would be bad for their business, so they treated him as a liability...
    Kovarian - "The anger of a good man is not a problem. Good men have too many rules"

    The Doctor - "Good men don't need rules. Today is not the day to find out why I have so many."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Once and Future Zag View Post
    It's probably unnecessary, but isn't this just the free market speaking?

    The Board saw that he would be bad for their business, so they treated him as a liability...
    One of the few times a pragmatic opinion springs from your keyboard.

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    Quote Originally Posted by former1dog View Post
    One of the few times a pragmatic opinion springs from your keyboard.
    Who pissed in your Cheerios this morning?
    Kovarian - "The anger of a good man is not a problem. Good men have too many rules"

    The Doctor - "Good men don't need rules. Today is not the day to find out why I have so many."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Once and Future Zag View Post
    Who pissed in your Cheerios this morning?
    The IRS

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    Point of order here. He stepped down. He was NOT asked by the board to do so. He did so on his own free will due to protests form employees and external groups. Free speech sucks in both directions on this one.
    "And Morrison? He did what All-Americans do. He shot daggers in the daylight and stole a win." - Steve Kelley (Seattle Times)

    "Gonzaga is a special place, with special people!" - Dan Dickau #21

    Foo me once shame on you, Foo me twice shame on me.

    2012 Foostrodamus - Foothsayer of Death

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    Quote Originally Posted by LongIslandZagFan View Post
    Point of order here. He stepped down. He was NOT asked by the board to do so. He did so on his own free will due to protests form employees and external groups. Free speech sucks in both directions on this one.
    I would guess he saw the writing on the wall. We won't ever know, but I think it highly likely that he had conversations with the board prior to his decision.

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    Quote Originally Posted by former1dog View Post
    I would guess he saw the writing on the wall. We won't ever know, but I think it highly likely that he had conversations with the board prior to his decision.

    IMHO... that isn't fair the board of the company. It is making a very large assumption that they requested it. Not saying it isn't possible, but assuming they did is just as unfair.

    http://money.cnn.com/2014/04/03/technology/mozilla-ceo/

    "Mozilla believes both in equality and freedom of speech," said Mitchell Baker, Mozilla's executive chairwoman in a blog post announcing the resignation. "Equality is necessary for meaningful speech. And you need free speech to fight for equality. Figuring out how to stand for both at the same time can be hard."
    "And Morrison? He did what All-Americans do. He shot daggers in the daylight and stole a win." - Steve Kelley (Seattle Times)

    "Gonzaga is a special place, with special people!" - Dan Dickau #21

    Foo me once shame on you, Foo me twice shame on me.

    2012 Foostrodamus - Foothsayer of Death

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    And this is why I keep my politics mostly to myself except in this relatively anonymous space.

    Funny situation happened to me recently.

    We have a family who has a son in our boys school we have befriended. Through FB posts it became pretty obvious that they are VERY liberal. I really don't care about that. They're nice people and we enjoy their company and I don't discuss politics in polite company. One thing that the Dad seems pretty passionate about is support of gay marriage. At least from his FB posts.

    Well, out of the blue a few weeks back the guy asks me to stand witness to his wedding vows. His wife is going through RCIA and because she wasn't Catholic when they got married they renewed their vows, but this time in a Catholic ceremony. I of course obliged, but got a bit of kick out the private irony.

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    Quote Originally Posted by former1dog View Post
    ... because he supported Prop 8 with a private donation.

    As best I can tell, his personal opinion had little to nothing to do with how he did his job and he said as much in a blog posting after the controversy began.

    What say you, OCC'ers, is this a good thing?
    So it's ok for the Boy Scouts to exclude Gay scout leaders, but it's not ok for a company to exclude a CEO for an anti-Gay stance?

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    I think this generally sucks. Part of the whole IRS 401(c)4 scandal (phony or otherwise) was that people were supposed to be given a means to donate anonymously, and the IRS was asking for way more information than allowed by law. I like protections like that, because this man's stance on traditional marriage has very little to do with his software company, and really shouldn't be any of our business if he doesn't want it to be.

    I think we have established that people are allowed to speak with their pocket books, and companies are allowed to fire people if their actions hurt the bottom line or out of line with their ethics. I do think, however, for the sake of consistency, if we are going to have moral outrage when a gay teacher is fired from a catholic school, moral outrage should be allowed when the shoe is on the other foot.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gu03alum View Post
    So it's ok for the Boy Scouts to exclude Gay scout leaders, but it's not ok for a company to exclude a CEO for an anti-Gay stance?
    Ok isn't the question I asked. Is it right or moral was more the question I was getting at.

    I agree in principle for Mozilla to do what it thinks is best for the company, which in this regard was to let the CEO resign.

    Morally, though, I have a problem with it because his point of view has absolutely nothing to with his job.

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    Quote Originally Posted by former1dog View Post
    Ok isn't the question I asked. Is it right or moral was more the question I was getting at.

    I agree in principle for Mozilla to do what it thinks is best for the company, which in this regard was to let the CEO resign.

    Morally, though, I have a problem with it because his point of view has absolutely nothing to with his job.
    But if the company is getting flack from developers, employees, and more importantly users... then yeah, in the end it DOES have something to do with is job.
    "And Morrison? He did what All-Americans do. He shot daggers in the daylight and stole a win." - Steve Kelley (Seattle Times)

    "Gonzaga is a special place, with special people!" - Dan Dickau #21

    Foo me once shame on you, Foo me twice shame on me.

    2012 Foostrodamus - Foothsayer of Death

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    Quote Originally Posted by LongIslandZagFan View Post
    But if the company is getting flack from developers, employees, and more importantly users... then yeah, in the end it DOES have something to do with is job.
    Yeah. I'm agreeing with that.

    I don't think I have to clarify my point of view for you any more do I. You understand where I'm coming from?

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    I think the Boy Scout example is not an equivalent comparison because the Scout Master is in a role as a de facto father figure to his troop, and part of the scouts is learning morals. It is much more important for a parent to know the world view of a Scout Master, who is a teacher and a mentor, as well as a caregiver (if a camping trip or similar) than the CEO of a software company. That said, a parent has options other than the Scouts, so if the parent was that concerned he/she could explore other options.

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    Quote Originally Posted by former1dog View Post

    I don't discuss politics in polite company.
    So what does that make us ??

    (pokes nest with stick, runs away )


    Be True to Your School

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    Quote Originally Posted by RenoZag View Post
    So what does that make us ??

    (pokes nest with stick, runs away )



    Reno,

    You're always welcome at my kitchen table, you know that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Once and Future Zag View Post
    It's probably unnecessary, but isn't this just the free market speaking?

    The Board saw that he would be bad for their business, so they treated him as a liability...
    Not sure about the free market thing. I can think of a lot of companies that have upset employees on how the leaders and business is doing and they don't get rid of a CEO or the CEO doesn't "step down."

    I know how it is to have an opinion that happens to go against the "tolerance" people, who are the most intolerant people I know, and it's not easy. This guy was probably saving his sanity and himself from further persecution. I guess these employees and users aren't so tolerant as they expect everyone else to be.
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    That is sad and reprehensible . Intolerance is intolerance and shameful. The good news is that Mr. Mozilla will find a job and as a member of a vast majority will be welcome, perhaps even benefit from this incident.

    Sitting here with my coffee this morning , just off the top of my head, I can think of a dozen non conforming men and women who never even got a job they were qualified for and others who were ridiculed, ostracized and harassed and even sabotaged out of a job they were performing well.

    In the context of untold millions who have been bullied and cheated , this is not such a big outrage.... I am sure he will be very successful ..

    It is unfortunate that people will use these incidents to justify their bigotry with the " but mom, everyone does it " excuse.

  22. #22

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    http://whatever.scalzi.com/2014/04/0...h-and-mozilla/

    When you’re the CEO of a corporation where a large number of your stakeholders support same sex marriage, either for personal or professional reasons, your choice in the past to offer support to make such (at the time legal) marriages illegal is a legitimate issue for discussion. Additionally, your further choice not to speak on your current personal thoughts on the topic (whether or not you pledge your company to openness and diversity) is also a legitimate issue for discussion. If a CEO is not willing to accept that there are consequences to his or her past and current actions, they should not be a CEO. Being a CEO is fundamentally about there being consequences to your actions.
    MB: Scalzi's "Whatever" is one the few exceptions of the 1st rule of the internet: "Never read the comments"
    Last edited by Once and Future Zag; 04-06-2014 at 10:02 AM.
    Kovarian - "The anger of a good man is not a problem. Good men have too many rules"

    The Doctor - "Good men don't need rules. Today is not the day to find out why I have so many."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Once and Future Zag View Post
    http://whatever.scalzi.com/2014/04/0...h-and-mozilla/



    MB: Scalzi's "Whatever" is one the few exceptions of the 1st rule of the internet: "Never read the comments"
    I find it galling that a guy like Scalzi, who's never run so much as a hot dog stand according to his biography on his blog, has decided he knows what is "fundamental about being a CEO."

    Seriously, what the #### does he know?

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    Quote Originally Posted by former1dog View Post
    I find it galling that a guy like Scalzi, who's never run so much as a hot dog stand according to his biography on his blog, has decided he knows what is "fundamental about being a CEO."

    Seriously, what the #### does he know?
    I am only saying this because I care - there are a lot of decaffeinated brands on the market today that are just as tasty as the real thing.

    But seriously - do you have any substantive disagreements, or did you just not like his reasoning?
    Kovarian - "The anger of a good man is not a problem. Good men have too many rules"

    The Doctor - "Good men don't need rules. Today is not the day to find out why I have so many."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Once and Future Zag View Post
    I am only saying this because I care - there are a lot of decaffeinated brands on the market today that are just as tasty as the real thing.

    But seriously - do you have any substantive disagreements, or did you just not like his reasoning?
    I'm just curious as to why we should given any credence whatsoever to Mr. Scalzi's opinion? Seems like a knucklehead with a keyboard.

    The substantive objection is he doesn't know what the #### he's talking about.

    If I were to rank as a percentage issues important to Mr. Eich's performance as CEO of Mozilla his personal belief on same sex marriage prior to it being made public, it would be around .01% or less.

    I'll elaborate. If it came up at all as a matter of consideration, it would be a very quick conversation with the head of HR. The question would be something like this:

    HR VP - Mr. Eich are we going to extend benefits to same sex couples.

    Eich - Absolutely, we'll need to do that to stay competitive in our hiring practices.


    CEO's make business decisions. This is a business decision and unless its something that is illegal, unsafe or blatantly immoral, the morality question isn't considered and Mr. Eich's private beliefs on the matter wouldn't enter into the conversation either.

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