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Thread: If you think it, post it

  1. #6076
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    Hoping you have a sense of humor too!

  2. #6077
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    Been on a bit of a Blade Runner 2049 kick lately.

    Lets address the negatives:

    Long.... yes.
    Slow... yes.
    Confusing... somewhat.

    But I have found that upon more viewings that the slowness is partially because the thing is so beautifully shot that wasting even 1 second of some of that cinematography would border on a sin. All of the shots at Wallace Industries are so beautifully shot.
    Long... OK... I can concur... thing is almost 3 hours and there is a rumor that there is a 4 hour cut... but again goes back to the cinematography issue. The confusing part is just an extension of those two things IMHO. After about 2 viewings, the story all clicks. JMHO, that is the true beauty of the movie. It is actually really a great storyline and brings up huge ethical and philosophical questions.

    My 2 pennies.
    "And Morrison? He did what All-Americans do. He shot daggers in the daylight and stole a win." - Steve Kelley (Seattle Times)

    "Gonzaga is a special place, with special people!" - Dan Dickau #21

    Foo me once shame on you, Foo me twice shame on me.

    2012 Foostrodamus - Foothsayer of Death

  3. #6078
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    My neighbor is out picking up dog poop in her yard barefoot. Why wouldn't you put on shoes for that?

  4. #6079
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pallet View Post
    My neighbor is out picking up dog poop in her yard barefoot. Why wouldn't you put on shoes for that?
    How would you know unless you feel that squishy feeling between your toes?
    "And Morrison? He did what All-Americans do. He shot daggers in the daylight and stole a win." - Steve Kelley (Seattle Times)

    "Gonzaga is a special place, with special people!" - Dan Dickau #21

    Foo me once shame on you, Foo me twice shame on me.

    2012 Foostrodamus - Foothsayer of Death

  5. #6080
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    Quote Originally Posted by LongIslandZagFan View Post
    Been on a bit of a Blade Runner 2049 kick lately.

    Lets address the negatives:

    Long.... yes.
    Slow... yes.
    Confusing... somewhat.

    But I have found that upon more viewings that the slowness is partially because the thing is so beautifully shot that wasting even 1 second of some of that cinematography would border on a sin. All of the shots at Wallace Industries are so beautifully shot.
    Long... OK... I can concur... thing is almost 3 hours and there is a rumor that there is a 4 hour cut... but again goes back to the cinematography issue. The confusing part is just an extension of those two things IMHO. After about 2 viewings, the story all clicks. JMHO, that is the true beauty of the movie. It is actually really a great storyline and brings up huge ethical and philosophical questions.

    My 2 pennies.
    Is Wallace Industries upstairs in downtown Wallace?
    Hoping you have a sense of humor too!

  6. #6081
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    Quote Originally Posted by willandi View Post
    Is Wallace Industries upstairs in downtown Wallace?
    LOL
    "And Morrison? He did what All-Americans do. He shot daggers in the daylight and stole a win." - Steve Kelley (Seattle Times)

    "Gonzaga is a special place, with special people!" - Dan Dickau #21

    Foo me once shame on you, Foo me twice shame on me.

    2012 Foostrodamus - Foothsayer of Death

  7. #6082
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    So, I was out enjoying the evening in my garden. It is my "valium" - I walk through my garden as the sun sets, I feel my heart rate slow, look at new growth, enjoy the beauty. It is wonderful.

    Then I hear the "puppy" (who weighs more than daughter, at 100 lbs), he's barking, but it's not a regular bark. It's a "Hey, Boss!! Bos!!! Get over here!" bark. I can tell something is very wrong.

    I grab a shovel and tell my wife to follow me - she goes inside, instead. And I grabbed the wrong shovel. The shortest one.

    I run about 50 yards, and see that he's bayed up a snake. I scream at him - anti-venom is $600 a pop, for one injection, and sometimes it takes 2-3, we know bc he got bit in the foot last year by a moccasin. I scream enough that he's scared, and he gets behind me. That is job one.

    I look at the snake. IT's a problem, bc down here, we have water moccasins, copperheads, eastern diamondbacks, and timber rattlesnakes. It was not "obviously" any of those, which could make it a King snake, which are the type you want around, since they eat the bad snakes. Problem is, it is very very tough to ID them bc water moccassins can come in so many different colors, etc.

    It was coiled up like a cobra, and it kept shaking its tail. But it didn't have a rattle.

    Whack.

    I just couldn't tell for sure, and I do NOT like to kill indiscriminately. My wife's attitude is "a dead snake is a good snake" - - I don't like that. I hugely fear snakes, HUGE. And I do NOT like them. But, they are reclusive animals, they don't "stalk you" or anything unfair. They have a right to live, too. This one just happened to be going the same place as my dog. He was probably 80 yards from the house, 40 from the garden, and 50 from the pond.

    But, it had a triangle head, no doubt. Post-mortem, my daughter and I found two sticks and ran along the top of its mouth, and we were able to "palpitate" two fangs, but not able to get them to fold outward, only reel the prick and (sort of) see them along the top of the mouth. We are still not positive it was poisonous.

    It was not big, it was maybe 4-5 feet long, fairly heavy bodied, mostly black with some gold patterns. The one outlayer is that it could have been a young young eastern diamondback, not old enough to have a rattle, but was shaking its tail like it had one.


    I feel bad bc it is just as likely that I killed a harmless snake as a poisonous one. But, I have a puppy - big as he is, and a daughter, small as she is, that both run right around where this guy was, and it is just too dangerous to have poisonous snake inhabiting the same area. I do not go out in the woods and find them and kill them like some do - that's there spot. But when they come near the house/garden, ….


    It's still bothering me, though.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  8. #6083
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    Yeah. It's easy to rationalize it by saying to yourself, "Better safe than sorry" but I get where you're at with this. These creatures didn't ask us to encroach on their space. They have a right to live. But, you did the right thing protecting your daughter.

    I get the same queasy feeling when driving and hitting a bird or a squirrel. Messes me up for a couple days.

  9. #6084
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    Quote Originally Posted by LongIslandZagFan View Post
    Been on a bit of a Blade Runner 2049 kick lately.
    I enjoyed that movie. I do not remember it being long, but it has been a few years since I last watched it. I will have to rewatch it. I think I saw it on HBO the other day.
    Bring back the OCC

  10. #6085
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    Quote Originally Posted by DixieZag View Post
    So, I was out enjoying the evening in my garden. It is my "valium" - I walk through my garden as the sun sets, I feel my heart rate slow, look at new growth, enjoy the beauty. It is wonderful.

    Then I hear the "puppy" (who weighs more than daughter, at 100 lbs), he's barking, but it's not a regular bark. It's a "Hey, Boss!! Bos!!! Get over here!" bark. I can tell something is very wrong.

    I grab a shovel and tell my wife to follow me - she goes inside, instead. And I grabbed the wrong shovel. The shortest one.

    I run about 50 yards, and see that he's bayed up a snake. I scream at him - anti-venom is $600 a pop, for one injection, and sometimes it takes 2-3, we know bc he got bit in the foot last year by a moccasin. I scream enough that he's scared, and he gets behind me. That is job one.

    I look at the snake. IT's a problem, bc down here, we have water moccasins, copperheads, eastern diamondbacks, and timber rattlesnakes. It was not "obviously" any of those, which could make it a King snake, which are the type you want around, since they eat the bad snakes. Problem is, it is very very tough to ID them bc water moccassins can come in so many different colors, etc.

    It was coiled up like a cobra, and it kept shaking its tail. But it didn't have a rattle.

    Whack.

    I just couldn't tell for sure, and I do NOT like to kill indiscriminately. My wife's attitude is "a dead snake is a good snake" - - I don't like that. I hugely fear snakes, HUGE. And I do NOT like them. But, they are reclusive animals, they don't "stalk you" or anything unfair. They have a right to live, too. This one just happened to be going the same place as my dog. He was probably 80 yards from the house, 40 from the garden, and 50 from the pond.

    But, it had a triangle head, no doubt. Post-mortem, my daughter and I found two sticks and ran along the top of its mouth, and we were able to "palpitate" two fangs, but not able to get them to fold outward, only reel the prick and (sort of) see them along the top of the mouth. We are still not positive it was poisonous.

    It was not big, it was maybe 4-5 feet long, fairly heavy bodied, mostly black with some gold patterns. The one outlayer is that it could have been a young young eastern diamondback, not old enough to have a rattle, but was shaking its tail like it had one.


    I feel bad bc it is just as likely that I killed a harmless snake as a poisonous one. But, I have a puppy - big as he is, and a daughter, small as she is, that both run right around where this guy was, and it is just too dangerous to have poisonous snake inhabiting the same area. I do not go out in the woods and find them and kill them like some do - that's there spot. But when they come near the house/garden, ….


    It's still bothering me, though.
    I came across a lot of snakes when I lived in Virginia. One time I looked down and there was one under the table I was sitting next to. I don't think I have jumped and ran so fast before. All the snakes at my house were non-poisonous though my neighbors had posted pictures of copperheads in their yards. I came across a rattlesnake in Shenandoah when I was out for a hike. It was just laying in the trail all coiled up. I tried to go around it giving it like ten feet, but it started hissing and shaking its rattle. I backed off and waited. A few minutes later it went back into the bushes and I was able to pass.

    I think I would have done the same thing as you in your situation (if I had enough courage with a short shovel).
    Bring back the OCC

  11. #6086
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    Quote Originally Posted by DixieZag View Post
    So, I was out enjoying the evening in my garden. It is my "valium" - I walk through my garden as the sun sets, I feel my heart rate slow, look at new growth, enjoy the beauty. It is wonderful.

    Then I hear the "puppy" (who weighs more than daughter, at 100 lbs), he's barking, but it's not a regular bark. It's a "Hey, Boss!! Bos!!! Get over here!" bark. I can tell something is very wrong.

    I grab a shovel and tell my wife to follow me - she goes inside, instead. And I grabbed the wrong shovel. The shortest one.

    I run about 50 yards, and see that he's bayed up a snake. I scream at him - anti-venom is $600 a pop, for one injection, and sometimes it takes 2-3, we know bc he got bit in the foot last year by a moccasin. I scream enough that he's scared, and he gets behind me. That is job one.

    I look at the snake. IT's a problem, bc down here, we have water moccasins, copperheads, eastern diamondbacks, and timber rattlesnakes. It was not "obviously" any of those, which could make it a King snake, which are the type you want around, since they eat the bad snakes. Problem is, it is very very tough to ID them bc water moccassins can come in so many different colors, etc.

    It was coiled up like a cobra, and it kept shaking its tail. But it didn't have a rattle.

    Whack.

    I just couldn't tell for sure, and I do NOT like to kill indiscriminately. My wife's attitude is "a dead snake is a good snake" - - I don't like that. I hugely fear snakes, HUGE. And I do NOT like them. But, they are reclusive animals, they don't "stalk you" or anything unfair. They have a right to live, too. This one just happened to be going the same place as my dog. He was probably 80 yards from the house, 40 from the garden, and 50 from the pond.

    But, it had a triangle head, no doubt. Post-mortem, my daughter and I found two sticks and ran along the top of its mouth, and we were able to "palpitate" two fangs, but not able to get them to fold outward, only reel the prick and (sort of) see them along the top of the mouth. We are still not positive it was poisonous.

    It was not big, it was maybe 4-5 feet long, fairly heavy bodied, mostly black with some gold patterns. The one outlayer is that it could have been a young young eastern diamondback, not old enough to have a rattle, but was shaking its tail like it had one.


    I feel bad bc it is just as likely that I killed a harmless snake as a poisonous one. But, I have a puppy - big as he is, and a daughter, small as she is, that both run right around where this guy was, and it is just too dangerous to have poisonous snake inhabiting the same area. I do not go out in the woods and find them and kill them like some do - that's there spot. But when they come near the house/garden, ….


    It's still bothering me, though.
    You did the right thing and you're right it's probably a juvenile so the markings weren't obvious. When I was in high school my dad was working in our garden and found this tiny snake with a really bad attitude. It was maybe 6" and was just determined to "strike" and very territorial. Somehow he managed to get it trapped in a bucket, it turned out it was a baby copperhead and it was nasty! It's a good thing we never came across mama copperhead, but we did find some really long snake skins that were shed.

  12. #6087
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    Well, now after a day, and after reviewing pictures put out by the State of MS Depart of Ecology, I am STILL not sure what kind of snake it was. I would go and retrieve the body but I don't want the puppy following me to where I threw it. I want to ID it bc I want to get better at ID'ing them, so that I can leave the harmless ones alone.

    I will kill any poisonous snake near the house. True, it is not their fault that they wandered up near the house, but nature is pretty cruel, too.

    A couple of really positive things came of it:

    1. My dog now HAS to be scared of snakes. Because I just screamed at him like no tomorrow as he danced around it baying it up. And he saw ME terrified, so he has to know "these guys are not good" - - and that's huge bc he's not even 2 yet and already been bit once, and it's just a matter of time until he gets it again, since he enjoys going down for a swim on hot days and guess where the snakes like to lay during the day? In the tall grass right at the lip of the water. He won't get bit WHILE swimming, he'll get bit jumping in or out of the pond, UNLESS he smells them before and figures out, "I don't want anything to do with these guys."

    2. I had my daughter practice defending herself with the shovel. Now, of course, I said "First rule is that if you can, you back up slowly, and run away and get me." But if she isn't in that position, I had a chance to teach her how to do it. I told her "Most people get bit 'stepping into the lunge' since they don't know how far out a snake can strike. So, put your foot forward, plant it, and then lunge over the foot with the shovel at the head, and pin the head. Once the head is pinned, then you can whack it." - - Yes, it's gross to tell the story, but I did feel it was important to show her, AND she sort of demanded to know how to do it. She's seen enough to know it's also only a matter of time until she runs into one herself, and if she has to "do something" I would just assume her do it right.

    I learned a good ID method, slit eyes - vertical - means "vipers" and at least in North America, that means poisonous. Ellipical eyes in North America means non-poisonous. (Don't take that advice on the road, obviously, Black Mambas have round eyes) I didn't get to go "eye to eye" with this one, and I'm not going to get its body.

    Better than 50-50 that I killed a harmless king snake. But, I have done even more to educate myself so that it doesn't happen again, and I am at peace with having to defend this place with what we have.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  13. #6088
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    Dixie... remember when it comes to family and pets... err on the side of safety over not wanting to kill an animal/reptile/insect/what-have-you. You don't want to make a mistake and second guess yourself after something bad happens. As long as you aren't out there killing willie-nillie then it is just part of the natural process of life... harsh as that may sound
    "And Morrison? He did what All-Americans do. He shot daggers in the daylight and stole a win." - Steve Kelley (Seattle Times)

    "Gonzaga is a special place, with special people!" - Dan Dickau #21

    Foo me once shame on you, Foo me twice shame on me.

    2012 Foostrodamus - Foothsayer of Death

  14. #6089
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    Quote Originally Posted by gu03alum View Post
    I enjoyed that movie. I do not remember it being long, but it has been a few years since I last watched it. I will have to rewatch it. I think I saw it on HBO the other day.
    Shade under 3 hours. Definitely watch it again. Knowing the full story and going back allows you to see some of the foreshadowing more clearly and lets you focus on the subtleties
    "And Morrison? He did what All-Americans do. He shot daggers in the daylight and stole a win." - Steve Kelley (Seattle Times)

    "Gonzaga is a special place, with special people!" - Dan Dickau #21

    Foo me once shame on you, Foo me twice shame on me.

    2012 Foostrodamus - Foothsayer of Death

  15. #6090
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    Years ago, when my youngest daughter was about 4, we had a small snake show up in our garage. I had just bought a bushel of apples from an orchard, so I assume it came in with that. My wife saw it first and went into panic mode. I got a spade and lopped it’s head off. My oldest daughter fell apart and blamed me for killing one of God’s creatures. My 4 year old walked in rather airily and simple said “Snakes don’t belong in garages” and kept walking right on by with hardly a glance.
    'I found it is the small everyday deeds of ordinary folk that keep the darkness at bay… small acts of kindness and love.'
    - Gandalf the Grey

    ________________________________



    Foo Time

  16. #6091
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    Quote Originally Posted by kitzbuel View Post
    Years ago, when my youngest daughter was about 4, we had a small snake show up in our garage. I had just bought a bushel of apples from an orchard, so I assume it came in with that. My wife saw it first and went into panic mode. I got a spade and lopped it’s head off. My oldest daughter fell apart and blamed me for killing one of God’s creatures. My 4 year old walked in rather airily and simple said “Snakes don’t belong in garages” and kept walking right on by with hardly a glance.
    4 year old's statement....

    My 5yo loves reading about snakes, reptiles, spiders, all the creepy crawlies. We were at the park last week with his preschool girlfriend and he tried to woo her with knowledge of birdeater tarantulas.

  17. #6092
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    Quote Originally Posted by LongIslandZagFan View Post
    Dixie... remember when it comes to family and pets... err on the side of safety over not wanting to kill an animal/reptile/insect/what-have-you. You don't want to make a mistake and second guess yourself after something bad happens. As long as you aren't out there killing willie-nillie then it is just part of the natural process of life... harsh as that may sound
    I really appreciate the clarity and support of the people here, bc it has summed it up for me and I am at peace with it.

    I struggled with it precisely bc I am so phobic of snakes that I probably over-protected that I was killing them just to be killing snakes, but it's actually not the case. I was fully prepared to let that one go.

    I have educated myself about as much as one can, and am content with "If I cannot identify it, and it is close to the house, it has to go" - - and that was drilled into me by the legal secretary that I work with here who has lived here all her life. She said "around here, the water moccasins have no set pattern or anything, you will never know beforehand unless you're an expert. If you're in doubt, they have to go."

    And that's that.

    Weird evolutionary point, I have yet to run into a rattlesnake here but rumor has it they're evolving, to NOT rattle anymore. The rattle evolved when their biggest threat was being stepped on by something with hooves, deer, buffalo, whatever. Now, though, the rattle has done them nothing but a disservice, with it getting them noticed and killed. So, people say that they are content to not rattle nowadays, I don't know.

    I know copperheads easily, I have had to dispatch 2 of those. And I know I spent $1,250 on vet bills last year with the pup, and I try to imagine the pain that the puppy went through, and place my daughter in that position - or me - and figure, it's just too dangerous.

    Thanks, all.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  18. #6093
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    Quote Originally Posted by kitzbuel View Post
    Years ago, when my youngest daughter was about 4, we had a small snake show up in our garage. I had just bought a bushel of apples from an orchard, so I assume it came in with that. My wife saw it first and went into panic mode. I got a spade and lopped it’s head off. My oldest daughter fell apart and blamed me for killing one of God’s creatures. My 4 year old walked in rather airily and simple said “Snakes don’t belong in garages” and kept walking right on by with hardly a glance.
    Yeah, I think I'm totally on board with that rule, absolutely.

    We had a gecko in the sunroom, that I kind of liked to watch, he would eat bugs, etc, I kind of liked the guy. But my daughter said "Get it out, no reptiles loose in the house" - and so I did. I gave him a nice shady spot … next to the house.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  19. #6094
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    Oracle... how much do you suck... let me count the ways. Wasted 5 hours tonight during an upgrade because the system thought it would be a great idea to take something simple and make it way more complex than it needed to be. Simple process of building an index, which should have taken less than a second... it takes and does it in parallel 32 times across 3 database servers... making it run for 1 minute. Then I open up a severity 1 case with them to get this resolved... they come back with NADA... Zero. My boss took a lead on something I found while trying to figure out what was going while I opened the case. Simple parameter change telling the database engine to stop making stuff more complicated and boom... 1000 indexes needed to get built... first 200 took an hour... when we changed it... boom remaining 800 done in 20 minutes. I want the last 6 hours back thank you.

    </rant>
    "And Morrison? He did what All-Americans do. He shot daggers in the daylight and stole a win." - Steve Kelley (Seattle Times)

    "Gonzaga is a special place, with special people!" - Dan Dickau #21

    Foo me once shame on you, Foo me twice shame on me.

    2012 Foostrodamus - Foothsayer of Death

  20. #6095
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    Quote Originally Posted by LongIslandZagFan View Post
    Oracle... how much do you suck... let me count the ways. Wasted 5 hours tonight during an upgrade because the system thought it would be a great idea to take something simple and make it way more complex than it needed to be. Simple process of building an index, which should have taken less than a second... it takes and does it in parallel 32 times across 3 database servers... making it run for 1 minute. Then I open up a severity 1 case with them to get this resolved... they come back with NADA... Zero. My boss took a lead on something I found while trying to figure out what was going while I opened the case. Simple parameter change telling the database engine to stop making stuff more complicated and boom... 1000 indexes needed to get built... first 200 took an hour... when we changed it... boom remaining 800 done in 20 minutes. I want the last 6 hours back thank you.

    </rant>

    Are they like so much of high tech industry nowadays where they're basically a monopoly now?


    Is there competitive stuff that does what you need professionally, but maybe better service?


    So much of modern American business is based on monopoly now, Walmart, Amazon, Windows, Google, FB, Xfinity, Boeing or they are based on price collusion, airlines, banking, that it is just sickening.


    That transcends party in power. Doesn't matter anymore.


    There actually still is a department at DOJ that is the anti-trust division, they just no longer do anything. When MSFT escaped being broken up, it told the nation "everything goes now" bc if you couldn't break up that company, what could one break now?

    And there's no modern day TDR in our future, not with Citizen's United. Warren would likely bust a lot up or at least enforce rules, which is precisely why she will never be elected.

    That is not a political statement, again, that transcends all parties now.

    Put me in charge for a day as benevolent king and I break Google, FB, MSFT, etc. into a thousand little pieces.

    Irony is that it would make the stockholders MORE money as they'd get pieces of each and competition increases value.

    But, CEOs and Board's want power over money nowadays, and stability. That doesn't happen if broken all up.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  21. #6096
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    Neat answer to my snake problem.

    I actually had a second one that WAS poisonous (copperhead) wander up the grass yesterday.

    There are exterminators that will come and weed a lot out, but they're not all that effective outdoors, and they pretty much kill everything.

    So I called Miss State - the ag school, and talked to a reptile specialist, professor.

    He is going to come out and bring some grad students.

    Reason being, we have 2 extremely rare gopher tortoises on the prop, so they are always studied (highly endangered, felony to move them)

    AND, I told them they could have the run of the place to study, we have turtles, the snakes, small gators (they never come up out of the water here) the rare rare tortoises, and the habitat with fish, birds, insects they eat, all that, small lake on the prop, and other than me fishing, most of it goes totally untouched all year every year - granny has it logged about every 10-12 years.

    So, he's super excited, said he had a couple grad students that needed a habitat that would be basically untouched (we have 160 acres of just forest, creek) to do studies.

    AND, he said he'd poke around "a lot" and remove any nests of snakes "at least cut down the population quite a bit" and release them down by the reservoir 3 miles down the road.

    That just seems like a great win for all of us.

    Nice guy, smart biologist, herpetologist, and experienced.

    Amazingly, bad as the reputation of all the public schools down here is, the ag programs at Miss State are extremely well respected. It's not UC Davis, WSU or TAMU, but it is a more than respectable program, closer to those elite ones than to an Arkansas or even the sub-tier LSU or whatever.

    Anyway, just thought some might think it a neat solution.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  22. #6097
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    Quote Originally Posted by DixieZag View Post
    Neat answer to my snake problem.

    I actually had a second one that WAS poisonous (copperhead) wander up the grass yesterday.

    There are exterminators that will come and weed a lot out, but they're not all that effective outdoors, and they pretty much kill everything.

    So I called Miss State - the ag school, and talked to a reptile specialist, professor.

    He is going to come out and bring some grad students.

    Reason being, we have 2 extremely rare gopher tortoises on the prop, so they are always studied (highly endangered, felony to move them)

    AND, I told them they could have the run of the place to study, we have turtles, the snakes, small gators (they never come up out of the water here) the rare rare tortoises, and the habitat with fish, birds, insects they eat, all that, small lake on the prop, and other than me fishing, most of it goes totally untouched all year every year - granny has it logged about every 10-12 years.

    So, he's super excited, said he had a couple grad students that needed a habitat that would be basically untouched (we have 160 acres of just forest, creek) to do studies.

    AND, he said he'd poke around "a lot" and remove any nests of snakes "at least cut down the population quite a bit" and release them down by the reservoir 3 miles down the road.

    That just seems like a great win for all of us.

    Nice guy, smart biologist, herpetologist, and experienced.

    Amazingly, bad as the reputation of all the public schools down here is, the ag programs at Miss State are extremely well respected. It's not UC Davis, WSU or TAMU, but it is a more than respectable program, closer to those elite ones than to an Arkansas or even the sub-tier LSU or whatever.

    Anyway, just thought some might think it a neat solution.
    That's really cool. An opportunity for the students to study a relatively unmolested ecosystem combined with a little less stress worrying about dangerous creatures. An elegant solution and a generous offer on your part. Well done.

  23. #6098
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    Best way to keep snakes at bay is to eliminate habitat for their prey. We got rid of old wood piles, keep the yard and bushes trimmed back and try to keep sheds cleaned out pretty well. That helps keep the rodent population down. Foxes help with that a lot, too.
    'I found it is the small everyday deeds of ordinary folk that keep the darkness at bay… small acts of kindness and love.'
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  24. #6099
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    Quote Originally Posted by kitzbuel View Post
    Best way to keep snakes at bay is to eliminate habitat for their prey. We got rid of old wood piles, keep the yard and bushes trimmed back and try to keep sheds cleaned out pretty well. That helps keep the rodent population down. Foxes help with that a lot, too.
    Oh I absolutely positively have done that the first couple weeks.

    I removed the wood, took out all tall grass around the house, basically removed all shade near the nouse, then I mowed down acres of weeds and tall grass that started about 30 yards from the house and literally mowed a few acres down to the level of a fairway.

    The grass filled it in over one season, and today it LOOKS like fairways with a few tall trees and SMALL islands of saplings/rocks left untouched to make it REALLY pretty. Granny said it is "stunning" bc I keep it mowed now down to the level of tight fairway (I mow an hour a day, love it, relaxing).

    It literally looks like small golf course and I MADE a 6 hole par 3 course with just pylons and circles around them as the "hole" - 4 holes are 80'ish" yards, 2 holes are 125.

    My daughter's softball team had batting practice on the prop this year bc they could do more convenient times, not worrying about other teams.


    Anyway, did all that bc it keeps mice away, and keeping mice away keeps snakes away, plus snakes do NOT like slithering over tight grass/spaces bc they're exposed to hawks and ME.

    I researched all that as my first attempts. The ones we find slithering on the tight grass are - according to my research - "lost," took a wrong turn - and trying to figure out how to get off, more than trying to get near the house.


    We just have SO many bc we're totally in the most concentrated area of poisonous snakes in the country (FLA panhandle, southern AL, MS, LA), AND, we have the forest, and granny has a HUGE lake (for private prop) they built damning the creek, that is FANTASTIC bass fishing for me bc I'm the ONLY person who fishes and I release all but maybe one medium one 3-4x a year when granny wants "some fresh fish" - ….

    So she sorta created this "snake haven," and obviously a haven for other reptiles, too, and the rare tortoises, the guy at MSU couldn't believe we had TWO.


    The fairways start about 40 yards from the house, lake is 200 yards, and I even mow among the pine near the house.


    So I agree 100% and did all that immediately. Of course, I had to research how to do the stuff, other than the obvious "remove junk, all wood, etc"
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

  25. #6100
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    Quote Originally Posted by kitzbuel View Post
    Best way to keep snakes at bay is to eliminate habitat for their prey. We got rid of old wood piles, keep the yard and bushes trimmed back and try to keep sheds cleaned out pretty well. That helps keep the rodent population down. Foxes help with that a lot, too.
    The one other thing that helps a TON is if we had 6-8 outdoor cats. But granny had an old dog that would've killed them, and then we got the pup who would now kill them (if we had them when he came at 6 weeks it would've worked, but old dog was still here then), so we can't do that.


    But having 3-5 outdoor cats would REALLY keep all mice away and the cats are somehow more naturally able to avoid snakes, smell or something, whereas the big dog just runs and runs, and loves chasing birds, and just steps on them or runs straight into one.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.
    Mark Twain.

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