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ZagNative
12-05-2007, 11:06 AM
Obviously, this is off the topic of the day, the Cougs-Zags game, but one of my goals this season is to become more knowledgeable about how to interpret stats, despite my math limitations, and so I found Ken Pomeroy's post in today's Basketball Prospectus (http://basketballprospectus.com/article.php?articleid=61)very interesting.

I'm bookmarking the article and hope to return to the topic as the season goes on for your help in bootstrapping myself into at least semi-stat-literate status.

That is all.

CDC84
12-05-2007, 11:31 AM
All from an analyst who actually said that the 2005/06 Gonzaga team wasn't good and worthy of any respect....despite their top 10 RPI ranking and 27-3 record going into the tournament.

Sorry - just couldn't resist :D

ZagNative
12-05-2007, 11:43 AM
So, CDC, are you saying I should save my few remaining gray cells for more productive pursuits?

CDC84
12-05-2007, 01:09 PM
Ken is a great source of information. His work just has its limitations and has to be taken in context. I come from the Rick Majerus school of thinking: "Statistics indict in basketball, and films convict." You need both to be able to interpret how good a team is. The reason why Ken is valuable is that people can watch basketball games a lot more easily than they can do statistics. At least that's the way it is for me.

I don't know if I want to get too much into this because I am aware of posters on this board that worship Ken. I'm just not one of them, but he is very much worth reading.

UberZagFan
12-05-2007, 01:33 PM
Uber agrees with CDC that the stats are only part of the picture. But it's helpful to gain an understanding of them and take them for what they are worth. This is especially true for the defensive stats--something very few bball fans are familiar with considering about the only defensive stats one sees in the box score are raw numbers for rebounds (and even then you have to subtract the offensive from the total), steals, blocks, and to some extent turnovers.