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View Full Version : Can someone explain to me reclassifying?



thespywhozaggedme
06-14-2018, 07:44 PM
Top 5 2019 stud center Charles Bassey just reclassified 2018 and committed to Western Kentucky. RJ Barret and I think Cam Reddish did it to and committed to Duke. This is a pretty recent phenomenon and I honestly don't get how it works, how to you just jump a grade and enter college a year before you're supposed to?

Zagceo
06-14-2018, 07:45 PM
GED?

https://ged.com/

zagamatic
06-14-2018, 08:22 PM
I know that a lot of kids have nearly enough, if not enough, credits accumulated by the end of their junior year to graduate if they really take the right courses and lay off the cupcake classes. Heck, a lot of kids have college credits by the time they graduate. I would imagine that it's something along those lines, but I admit that it's just an educated guess.

Spoko13
06-14-2018, 08:39 PM
If only it was because they worked so hard in school that they accumulated enough credits to graduate! I’m dying over here reading that one!!

These are kids who were held back in in 6th, 7th or 8th grade because of sports.......they are the 15 year old 8th graders your son is playing against in AAU.....and who knows maybe they were already old for their grade so they might be close to 16 by the time 8th grade is over.....then they get to HS and realize they’ll be nearly 20 when they graduate......time to re-class!!!

CarolinaZagFan
06-15-2018, 03:46 AM
Most of them don’t go to real schools, just these basketball academies. So I guess they can just make their transcripts say whatever they want whenever they want.

thebigsmoove
06-15-2018, 04:52 AM
Its a combination of all the things stated in this thread and more. Every players story is a little different. Ultimately what occurs is a player either has enough credits or takes weekend or summer classes to earn enough credits to graduate "early". In some cases that is because the student athlete did in fact work harder than others to jump a grade or in other cases they had a plan in place with the administration of their school to knock off an extra class a semester or something along those lines. The term simply means they are graduating early and dropping a year off their anticipated graduating class.

Zaga
06-15-2018, 05:26 AM
My daughter as an incoming Freshman has completed three online high school elective courses to this point through IDLA which is supported through the Idaho Legislature. The courses are legit semester courses and count againt the future graduates GPA. Unsure but other states must have some similar opportunities. This could be another way for student athletes to move forward more quickly.

Go Zags!

LongIslandZagFan
06-15-2018, 07:02 AM
Most of them don’t go to real schools, just these basketball academies. So I guess they can just make their transcripts say whatever they want whenever they want.

Think that is a pretty broad assumption to make. I am sure some are, but from my experience with my own kids, It isn't unrealistic if your kid is on an honors track that they have enough to graduate early. My kids didn't choose to, but could have. Many kids are taking HS level classes in 8th grade.

thespywhozaggedme
06-15-2018, 07:16 AM
My daughter as an incoming Freshman has completed three online high school elective courses to this point through IDLA which is supported through the Idaho Legislature. The courses are legit semester courses and count againt the future graduates GPA. Unsure but other states must have some similar opportunities. This could be another way for student athletes to move forward more quickly.

Go Zags!

We have something similar here in Greenville, there's a charter school that gives you high school and college credits simultaneously, but I don't think that's the same thing that we're talking about here. In this case kids who are supposed to graduate in 2019 suddenly "reclassify" and become 2018 recruits, the latest top 3 2019 stud center Charles Bassey who just "reclassified" to 2018 and committed to Western Kentucky.

NotoriousZ
06-15-2018, 08:58 AM
GED?

https://ged.com/

When I first saw this I thought you were suggesting Spy should get his GED. Thanks for the entertainment, carry on.

webspinnre
06-15-2018, 10:48 AM
I know that a lot of kids have nearly enough, if not enough, credits accumulated by the end of their junior year to graduate if they really take the right courses and lay off the cupcake classes. Heck, a lot of kids have college credits by the time they graduate. I would imagine that it's something along those lines, but I admit that it's just an educated guess.

This is the most likely answer. The minimum requirements to graduate in many states isn't that high, such that if you take the right classes, and possibly pick up an extra or two, it isn't too hard to do this. I graduated in three years, and even had time to take two band classes my "senior" year.

MileHigh
06-15-2018, 11:07 AM
This is the most likely answer. The minimum requirements to graduate in many states isn't that high, such that if you take the right classes, and possibly pick up an extra or two, it isn't too hard to do this. I graduated in three years, and even had time to take two band classes my "senior" year.

Just about every HS student can easily accumulate enough credits to graduate by December of their senior year, without ever going to summer school. This is real common with football kids who start college a semester early so that they can participate in spring football

If a kid wants to graduate a full year earlier it usually requires the student to take 3 or 4 summer classes (over multiple summers) and an additional class during the spring of their jr year. Some of these classes can be taken on line or pass fail. As long as all your core courses are taken for a grade you are an ncaa qualifier. Contrary to what another post suggested, you have to be a pretty diligent student to reclassify because it requires all your core classes be done over 6 semesters instead of 8

MileHigh
06-15-2018, 11:15 AM
Most of them don’t go to real schools, just these basketball academies. So I guess they can just make their transcripts say whatever they want whenever they want.

NCAA has done a pretty good job over the last few years of cleaning up the diploma mills. I know legit HS students who have had their eligibility held up while the clearinghouse checked and double checked their courses to make sure they fit all the requisite requirements, and those were students at regular public high schools. The prep schools get scrutinized even closer

caldwellzag
06-15-2018, 11:19 AM
I can tell you from teaching for the last 12 years that in the past 4-5 years there has been a huge push for students to take more and more high school credits in 8th grade, so that they can take college credits in high school. Last year my school hand 10 or so students with their AA on graduating, 10 years ago it was maybe 1 or 2. Online schools (like IDLA) have really made it easier for students to graduate early. Pass classes, get credits, and take senior English and Government early is all it requires. Senior year requirements in most states are just English and Government.

thebigsmoove
06-15-2018, 12:06 PM
When I first saw this I thought you were suggesting Spy should get his GED. Thanks for the entertainment, carry on.

:roll:

webspinnre
06-15-2018, 02:20 PM
Just about every HS student can easily accumulate enough credits to graduate by December of their senior year, without ever going to summer school. This is real common with football kids who start college a semester early so that they can participate in spring football

If a kid wants to graduate a full year earlier it usually requires the student to take 3 or 4 summer classes (over multiple summers) and an additional class during the spring of their jr year. Some of these classes can be taken on line or pass fail. As long as all your core courses are taken for a grade you are an ncaa qualifier. Contrary to what another post suggested, you have to be a pretty diligent student to reclassify because it requires all your core classes be done over 6 semesters instead of 8

The NCAA only requires 16 core courses, so that's not particularly challenging to accomplish in 3 years, as long as you have a plan to do so, the biggest one being doubling up on English or taking it over the summer at some point. At most schools you'll be completing between 18 and 21 courses over three years. I'm a high school guidance counselor and work in this area.

thespywhozaggedme
06-15-2018, 02:54 PM
When I first saw this I thought you were suggesting Spy should get his GED. Thanks for the entertainment, carry on.

My dad is an immigrant with a 3rd grade education. He came to America when he was 19 with less than $100 to his name. He started washing dishes in a diner in NJ, within 5 years he owned a diner. I am the first person in my family to graduate college. Your post was very insensitive and cruel.

seacatfan
06-15-2018, 04:08 PM
Marvin Bagley raised a few eyebrows. 3 different high schools in 3 years, hardly considered a good student, but graduated a year early. Duke has been way ahead of the curve on this. How dare other schools start getting recruits to reclassify? What's really weird is that several of the kids that skipped a year of HS because K really needed them right now ended up rotting on the bench for a year or two and then transferring out. (Has anyone figured out yet that I don't like K or Duke?)

MDABE80
06-15-2018, 05:02 PM
My dad is an immigrant with a 3rd grade education. He came to America when he was 19 with less than $100 to his name. He started washing dishes in a diner in NJ, within 5 years he owned a diner. I am the first person in my family to graduate college. Your post was very insensitive and cruel.

But why????

thespywhozaggedme
06-15-2018, 05:26 PM
Interesting development: 5* guard Ashton Hagans, the #17 recruit for 2019 just reclassified to 2019 and committed to Kentucky. Wasn't that the scholarship that they were leaving for Reid Travis?

NotoriousZ
06-15-2018, 09:39 PM
Didn't mean to offend, Spy. I just found it funny because you've been catching so much flack here lately (even more than you normally get) and at first glance it seemed like Zagceo was saying maybe you needed a little more education to understand the definition of reclassifying (as a joke). No offense was intended for those without a high school education.

KStyles
06-15-2018, 09:50 PM
Multiple ways to do it.

Some take summer courses to finish up the requirements after they've reclassified, some are in a prep school for a post-hs grad year where they've already qualified, some started high school with a graduation date year 5 years ahead, some just grind for 3 years to complete their courses knowing they'll have the option later to take PE/Band/Art/etc. (which don't matter to the NCAA) in the 4th year.

thespywhozaggedme
06-15-2018, 09:59 PM
Didn't mean to offend, Spy. I just found it funny because you've been catching so much flack here lately (even more than you normally get) and at first glance it seemed like Zagceo was saying maybe you needed a little more education to understand the definition of reclassifying (as a joke). No offense was intended for those without a high school education.

It just came across as very mocking towards people that are less educated and does hits pretty close to home for me as I mentioned my father never made it past the third grade yet despite all of that he wound up being very successful in life.

Spoko13
06-17-2018, 12:39 PM
While certainly not necessarily wrong, the posts on this thread have become naive and somewhat comical. Re-classing in the high end D1 world has ABSOLUTELY NOTHING to do with a kid working so hard in school that they decide to graduate early!! Again, these are HOLD BACKS.....kids who did a year over......for example if you move from your traditional HS to a private academy HS as a Sophomore and you repeat your Sophomore year over, it a a miracle but by the end of your “junior” year you have enough credits to graduate (you completed 4 years of HS)........you then to RE-Class from the 2019 class back to your natural 2018 class......

Obviously there are lots instances of smart kids who work really hard to graduate HS after their Junior year and go on to college.... That is NOT called re-classing....that is called graduating early!!! Get out in the AAU travel circuit and pay just a little bit of attention.

MileHigh
06-17-2018, 01:23 PM
While certainly not necessarily wrong, the posts on this thread have become naive and somewhat comical. Re-classing in the high end D1 world has ABSOLUTELY NOTHING to do with a kid working so hard in school that they decide to graduate early!! Again, these are HOLD BACKS.....kids who did a year over......for example if you move from your traditional HS to a private academy HS as a Sophomore and you repeat your Sophomore year over, it a a miracle but by the end of your “junior” year you have enough credits to graduate (you completed 4 years of HS)........you then to RE-Class from the 2019 class back to your natural 2018 class......

Obviously there are lots instances of smart kids who work really hard to graduate HS after their Junior year and go on to college.... That is NOT called re-classing....that is called graduating early!!! Get out in the AAU travel circuit and pay just a little bit of attention.

I have been out on the circuit for the last 15 years and know all about hold backs and prep schools, but the most high profile "reclass" kids of late dont fit your profile. Deryk Thornton graduated HS at 17(Duke) , Jontay Porter graduated HS at 17 (Mizzou), Marvin Bagley graduated HS at 18 (Duke). None of them were in HS more than 3 years.

Spoko13
06-17-2018, 02:09 PM
I have been out on the circuit for the last 15 years and know all about hold backs and prep schools, but the most high profile "reclass" kids of late dont fit your profile. Deryk Thornton graduated HS at 17(Duke) , Jontay Porter graduated HS at 17 (Mizzou), Marvin Bagley graduated HS at 18 (Duke). None of them were in HS more than 3 years.


Wrong - he had 4 years of HS......only played 3 though as he was ineligible one year.......at least one was at Prep school......so instead of doing his “senior” year in his 5th year of HS ball he “re-classes” back to his original year...

MileHigh
06-17-2018, 02:29 PM
Wrong - he had 4 years of HS......only played 3 though as he was ineligible one year.......at least one was at Prep school......so instead of doing his “senior” year in his 5th year of HS ball he “re-classes” back to his original year...

which of the kids are you referring to?

Spoko13
06-17-2018, 11:20 PM
Bagley

Spoko13
06-17-2018, 11:52 PM
As for Thornton - he was also “old”:

Before he reclassified, Thornton was ranked No. 11 overall in the Class of 2016 by ESPN. He ended up ranked the 17th-best player in the 2015 class, and the Blue Devils are especially excited about his abilities on the defensive end of the floor.

And because he repeated third grade for reasons unrelated to athletics, Thornton is 18, the age of most freshmen. Freshmen Chase Jeter and Brandon Ingram both are younger than he is despite spending four years in high school.

*Graduating early*

Most high school juniors are not in a position to graduate in three years and qualify at an NCAA Division I school. But Thornton didn’t go to a typical high school.

Findlay Prep, his alma mater in Henderson, Nev., is a boarding school composed only of the members of the school’s basketball team (last season, there were 11 of them).

They attend classes at Henderson International School, about 20 miles from Las Vegas. The school has about 400 students in its pre-K through eighth-grade levels, according to Findlay Prep coach Andy Johnson.

Its high school is made up entirely of the basketball team, which lives in two dorms about five minutes from campus.

Unlike Thornton, it takes most players four years to graduate.

“Our goal here, that we strive for every year, is for our guys to go into college as sophomores and not freshmen, where they are getting college-level practices, getting weights every day, going on the road playing top competition every game, living away from their families and homes, making that transition,” Johnson said. “So when they go into college, they’ve kind of already done college, their freshman year, at the high school level.”

The curriculum at Findlay calls for only NCAA core classes: English, math, natural, physical and social science classes (foreign languages count, too). NCAA athletes must take 16 core classes in high school to qualify to play at the Division I level, and maintain at least a 2.0 GPA and possibly higher, depending on their SAT/ACT scores:

▪ Four years’ worth of English

▪ Three years of math at the algebra 1 level or higher

▪ Two years of natural/physical science

▪ An additional year of one of the above categories

▪ Two years of social science

▪ Four additional years of English, math, natural/physical science, social science, foreign language, comparative religion or philosophy

Thornton transferred to Findlay Prep in 2013 after his freshman year at the more traditional Sierra Canyon High, a private school outside of Los Angeles. After that year and two years at Findlay not wasting time with electives, Thornton was in a position to finish his core classes this past summer after his junior year and join a high-level college basketball program this fall.

http://www.newsobserver.com/sports/college/acc/duke/duke-now/article44296788.html