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SWZag
02-16-2018, 07:05 AM
There are countless ways to measure the game of basketball. You can measure points, rebounds, points-per-40, games started, minutes, fouls-per-game, effective field goal percentage, the list is nearly endless.

But one thing that isn't, and probably can't, be measured is the team glue guy. I've thought of Melson as being the quiet leader and keeping this team together. His senior leadership is evident. While he's not outwardly emotional, he leads by example with toughness and a no-quit attitude, even during his struggles.

Over the course of this season, another player has really stood out as being a great leader. Perkins. It may not come as a surprise because I'm sure many people view him as the leader of this team. But I'm referring to the little things that really can bring a team together. Perkins is the emotional leader of the team, in my opinion. I think it's been a while since I've seen a player so supportive and congratulatory than Perkins has been this year. My memory isn't always the best, but his behavior has really stood out to me this year. I can't count the number of times he's ran from beyond the three point line to help a falling teammate get up under the basket. He's often the first one there even though his other three teammates are closer. This speaks volumes about a person's character and it's one that I greatly respect. It seems Perkins has to get the "most high/low fives" award. Players all do it, it's part of the game, but I can't recollect a player going out of his way to do it, not just once or twice, but multiple times a game. Perkins is turning into a great leader and next year we'll have a splendid leader. It's the little things that make a great leader.

So how do you measure the glue guy or the team leader? Not by numbers or equations, but by the subjective nature of our minds, I guess.

Anyway, it's just something I've been thinking about and thought I'd share and see if anyone else has noticed this also.

BavarianZag
02-16-2018, 03:42 PM
There are countless ways to measure the game of basketball. You can measure points, rebounds, points-per-40, games started, minutes, fouls-per-game, effective field goal percentage, the list is nearly endless.

But one thing that isn't, and probably can't, be measured is the team glue guy. I've thought of Melson as being the quiet leader and keeping this team together. His senior leadership is evident. While he's not outwardly emotional, he leads by example with toughness and a no-quit attitude, even during his struggles.

Over the course of this season, another player has really stood out as being a great leader. Perkins. It may not come as a surprise because I'm sure many people view him as the leader of this team. But I'm referring to the little things that really can bring a team together. Perkins is the emotional leader of the team, in my opinion. I think it's been a while since I've seen a player so supportive and congratulatory than Perkins has been this year. My memory isn't always the best, but his behavior has really stood out to me this year. I can't count the number of times he's ran from beyond the three point line to help a falling teammate get up under the basket. He's often the first one there even though his other three teammates are closer. This speaks volumes about a person's character and it's one that I greatly respect. It seems Perkins has to get the "most high/low fives" award. Players all do it, it's part of the game, but I can't recollect a player going out of his way to do it, not just once or twice, but multiple times a game. Perkins is turning into a great leader and next year we'll have a splendid leader. It's the little things that make a great leader.

So how do you measure the glue guy or the team leader? Not by numbers or equations, but by the subjective nature of our minds, I guess.

Anyway, it's just something I've been thinking about and thought I'd share and see if anyone else has noticed this also.


I like this post. A lot. He definitely deserves kudos in my mind. If I were a betting man, I'd bet on the fact his teammates feel the same way.

Rui is gin- exciting and nuanced and we keep getting different flavor profiles every outing it seems.
Norvell is like a scotch that isn't completely aged. Wonderful but you can imagine how much better he'll get. Definitely makes an interesting cocktail.
J3 is a good bourbon. Good all by himself but still solid in a variety of different concoctions.
But, Perk...he's the straw that stirs the drink. His teammates know it. His coaches do as well (to me he is clearly doing what is being asked of him).

Edited to add that Silas is like Campari. A little sweet with a touch of bitterness. Balances out the cocktail.

^^^can you tell I was in the middle of happy hour while posting?

Zagceo
02-17-2018, 07:05 AM
Senior night article on Melson


“I used to say, if you could get 11 words out of him,” said Tony, “he likes you.”

http://www.spokesman.com/stories/2018/feb/16/john-blanchette-silas-melson-has-been-a-key-part-o/

23dpg
02-17-2018, 07:20 AM
Senior night article on Melson



http://www.spokesman.com/stories/2018/feb/16/john-blanchette-silas-melson-has-been-a-key-part-o/

This deserves its own thread. Silas will go down as one of my favorite Zags ever!

Reborn
02-17-2018, 07:46 AM
Real good thread. To me the two most underrated thing in basketball cohesiveness and team chemistry. Cohesiveness is the word to describe how the team moves together. It's a thing of beauty. It's like watching professional dancers. Everyone knows what everyone else know and they know how to be in their spot at the right time. Team chemistry for me is best described by the GU coaches. They call this characteristic a closed tight fist "that's ready to knock someone out." The words inside the quotations are mine hahaha). The coaches say it describes the one for all and all for one kind of attitude. It's bond of brotherhood. It's the band of brothers. These two characteristics describe the unselfish play and hustle of every Zag team I've seen. You can't measure these things but you can certainly seem the displayed on the court.

Go Zags!!!

MontanaCoyote
02-17-2018, 08:05 AM
There are countless ways to measure the game of basketball. You can measure points, rebounds, points-per-40, games started, minutes, fouls-per-game, effective field goal percentage, the list is nearly endless.

But one thing that isn't, and probably can't, be measured is the team glue guy. I've thought of Melson as being the quiet leader and keeping this team together. His senior leadership is evident. While he's not outwardly emotional, he leads by example with toughness and a no-quit attitude, even during his struggles.

Over the course of this season, another player has really stood out as being a great leader. Perkins. It may not come as a surprise because I'm sure many people view him as the leader of this team. But I'm referring to the little things that really can bring a team together. Perkins is the emotional leader of the team, in my opinion. I think it's been a while since I've seen a player so supportive and congratulatory than Perkins has been this year. My memory isn't always the best, but his behavior has really stood out to me this year. I can't count the number of times he's ran from beyond the three point line to help a falling teammate get up under the basket. He's often the first one there even though his other three teammates are closer. This speaks volumes about a person's character and it's one that I greatly respect. It seems Perkins has to get the "most high/low fives" award. Players all do it, it's part of the game, but I can't recollect a player going out of his way to do it, not just once or twice, but multiple times a game. Perkins is turning into a great leader and next year we'll have a splendid leader. It's the little things that make a great leader.

So how do you measure the glue guy or the team leader? Not by numbers or equations, but by the subjective nature of our minds, I guess.

Anyway, it's just something I've been thinking about and thought I'd share and see if anyone else has noticed this also.

I really agree with your thesis and with your nod to Silas. Glue Guys, Leaders, accomplish what they do in many different ways and styles. It really is too bad that all the things these players do, both statistically quantifiable and intangible, can't be combined and quantified as a stat because, especially given the intangibles, they are true difference makers.

Last year I posted, possibly too often, that I thought no other player in D-1 basketball was as valuable to his team in so many different ways than Przemek Karnowski. I will believe that until the day I die.

Then we were also blessed with Nigel. Man, who could ask for more?!

Please excuse if "over share." When Gideon of "Gideon's Trumpet" fame (this was the Supreme Court case that required the accused be provided an attorney for trial even if unable to afford one) let his post conviction pro bono attorney know that he was going to appeal his case to the U.S. Supreme Court, the attorney told Gideon "You'd better get your 'sheet' together."

That's what these glue guy leaders do. They keep their team's sheet together.

Silas isn't NWG or Shem, he just does the same thing differently!

bballbeachbum
02-17-2018, 10:14 AM
excellent thread! great posts, thanks to all

that link is sweet Zagceo!!

zagbeliever
02-17-2018, 10:39 AM
This deserves its own thread. Silas will go down as one of my favorite Zags ever!

+1

Zagger
02-17-2018, 11:31 AM
Mike Hart factor :)
I think it can be measured by how red/sore the knees and elbows are - or maybe how often the kid sweepers have to come onto the floor.

Vanzagger
02-19-2018, 09:19 AM
SWZag great stuff

TimberZag
02-19-2018, 10:23 AM
Great post, SWZag. Love Silas. I especially love his sheepish look he’s given so many times after hitting a 3, and the little half grin. Perkins has stepped up as a leader and even more so as the season has progressed. So awesome to be able to watch these guys this year.

mgadfly
02-19-2018, 10:32 AM
Real good thread. To me the two most underrated thing in basketball cohesiveness and team chemistry. Cohesiveness is the word to describe how the team moves together. It's a thing of beauty. It's like watching professional dancers. Everyone knows what everyone else know and they know how to be in their spot at the right time. Team chemistry for me is best described by the GU coaches. They call this characteristic a closed tight fist "that's ready to knock someone out." The words inside the quotations are mine hahaha). The coaches say it describes the one for all and all for one kind of attitude. It's bond of brotherhood. It's the band of brothers. These two characteristics describe the unselfish play and hustle of every Zag team I've seen. You can't measure these things but you can certainly seem the displayed on the court.

Go Zags!!!

I agree, but I also include good bench guys (regardless of whether they ever get into a game or not) in with the cohesion and chemistry. Having had a couple bad apples on the bench before on teams Iíve coached there is a world of difference between a 12th man that is excited to be there and helps players who are getting time keep perspective and one who is either not in to it or a cancer.

Talent is really important but so is chemistry and cohesion and the latter two requires glue guys and scout team guys to be at their best too.

Markburn1
02-19-2018, 11:19 AM
Back to the title of the thread.

I was watching a game recently and one of the players was continually in the mix on the boards, on defense, loose balls, etc. I believe it was Fran Fraschilla on the mic and he encapsulated what it means to influence a game without creating measurable stats. He said, "An unrelenting energy and a willingness to pay attention to detail is a talent." He is absolutely correct and every championship team needs at least one of those to go along with the "stat" guys on the team.

Draymond Green is one of those guys.

Mantua
02-19-2018, 11:29 AM
Back to the title of the thread.

I was watching a game recently and one of the players was continually in the mix on the boards, on defense, loose balls, etc. I believe it was Fran Fraschilla on the mic and he encapsulated what it means to influence a game without creating measurable stats. He said, "An unrelenting energy and a willingness to pay attention to detail is a talent." He is absolutely correct and every championship team needs at least one of those to go along with the "stat" guys on the team.

Draymond Green is one of those guys.

Green could get many more double-doubles and triple-doubles, but he is a team first guy, (except for some of his technicals). Green hustles on every play.

Despite the foul trouble and missed shots we’ve seen lately, I think Zach Norvell is making an honest effort to bring energy to the game during his minutes.