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Skimhvn
01-21-2018, 12:53 AM
https://scout.com/college/kansas/Board/103719/Contents/College-Basketball-Popularity-vs-other-sports-72268622
I happened to find this page.
I know March Madness gets high TV ratings, but are there not many people who follow college basketball season?
Does that rank below NHL?

kitzbuel
01-21-2018, 04:22 AM
They are not a dying breed, but they are a niche group.

It is very hard any more to really rank sports popularity in the US because of proliferation of regional sports networks and internet viewing options. Sports fans can now really be specialist sports fans in just the sports of their interest.

Hard core college basketball fans are very dedicated and Gonzaga has a high number of them, because we have no football program. Students and alum from BCS schools will root for their basketball team out of school pride, but football dominates. In Washington for example, everyone roots for either UW Huskies football or WSU Cougars, even if they did not go to either of the schools. This is even more pronounced in the south, like Alabama where people will sometimes get preferential treatment in jobs or business based on whether they are Auburn or Alabama fans. My work has clients down there and that is frequently something we find out about them, if they are Auburn or Alabama fans.

MLB, NHL, and MLS really are niche sports. They have a lot of fans, but most fans watch their local teams and local broadcasts. Nationally televised games outside of championship games donít get wide viewership. NBA is really becoming that way, too. The internet and regional sports packages have really eroded the hold national broadcasters like ESPN or NBC have had on sports which is why they are struggling now.

So in short, college bb is not dying, just becoming specialized.


Almost all NCAA conference alignment decisions are based on football.

Zagger
01-21-2018, 05:09 AM
Not in Spokane :)

Skimhvn
01-21-2018, 05:17 AM
Thanks for great post. So football is too strong in US...

DixieZag
01-21-2018, 07:27 AM
They are not a dying breed, but they are a niche group.

It is very hard any more to really rank sports popularity in the US because of proliferation of regional sports networks and internet viewing options. Sports fans can now really be specialist sports fans in just the sports of their interest.

Hard core college basketball fans are very dedicated and Gonzaga has a high number of them, because we have no football program. Students and alum from BCS schools will root for their basketball team out of school pride, but football dominates. In Washington for example, everyone roots for either UW Huskies football or WSU Cougars, even if they did not go to either of the schools. This is even more pronounced in the south, like Alabama where people will sometimes get preferential treatment in jobs or business based on whether they are Auburn or Alabama fans. My work has clients down there and that is frequently something we find out about them, if they are Auburn or Alabama fans.

MLB, NHL, and MLS really are niche sports. They have a lot of fans, but most fans watch their local teams and local broadcasts. Nationally televised games outside of championship games don’t get wide viewership. NBA is really becoming that way, too. The internet and regional sports packages have really eroded the hold national broadcasters like ESPN or NBC have had on sports which is why they are struggling now.

So in short, college bb is not dying, just becoming specialized.


Almost all NCAA conference alignment decisions are based on football.

In W

Nicely done. I agree.

The only sport that isn't a niche sport now is football, primarily NFL but college, too.

With sports on a million channels at the same time, people can simply watch their own teams exclusively, and thus aren't general fans of the sport itself, or watch sports on tv to just catch a game.

I read that experts think that video gaming is cutting down on the numbers of younger people interested in sports, so fewer people overall become fans.

CDC84
01-21-2018, 01:16 PM
They are not a dying breed, but they are a niche group.

It is very hard any more to really rank sports popularity in the US because of proliferation of regional sports networks and internet viewing options. Sports fans can now really be specialist sports fans in just the sports of their interest.

Hard core college basketball fans are very dedicated and Gonzaga has a high number of them, because we have no football program. Students and alum from BCS schools will root for their basketball team out of school pride, but football dominates. In Washington for example, everyone roots for either UW Huskies football or WSU Cougars, even if they did not go to either of the schools. This is even more pronounced in the south, like Alabama where people will sometimes get preferential treatment in jobs or business based on whether they are Auburn or Alabama fans. My work has clients down there and that is frequently something we find out about them, if they are Auburn or Alabama fans.

MLB, NHL, and MLS really are niche sports. They have a lot of fans, but most fans watch their local teams and local broadcasts. Nationally televised games outside of championship games don’t get wide viewership. NBA is really becoming that way, too. The internet and regional sports packages have really eroded the hold national broadcasters like ESPN or NBC have had on sports which is why they are struggling now.

So in short, college bb is not dying, just becoming specialized.


Almost all NCAA conference alignment decisions are based on football.

This. I also feel the NCAA and other entities don't do a good enough job of promoting the sport of college basketball and its history. It's not going to make college basketball more popular than football, but when 95%+ of "casual fans" are not even aware that Kansas has won, what is it, 14 straight regular season Big 12 titles, there's a problem in the PR dept and explaining why the regular season is important. Also, when I hear "casual/March Madness fans" explain why they don't watch during the regular season, I hate to say it, but their reasons are often based on misinformation. Again, the NCAA, athletic departments, etc., not doing a good enough PR job. College basketball's popularity could be greater than it is across the whole season if they put in the effort. But because it's not going to increase the popularity by 25%, I guess they think it is not worth it.

LouisianaZag
01-21-2018, 04:38 PM
I don't think there is any doubt college basketball is a niche sport. My son a super sports follower seldom watches or pays attention to the basketball regular season. Since I am such a fan of Gonzaga and closely follow my school ULM he has started keeping up with those two but his primary interest is March Madness and March Madness only. He is not alone.

thebigsmoove
01-22-2018, 05:20 AM
In the case of TV ratings which is probably the best metric we can use, College Basketball ranks #6.

1. NFL
2. NBA
3. MLB
4. NCAA Football
5. NASCAR
6. NCAA Basketball (Mens)
7. PGA
8. NHL

But obviously the caveat would be that March Madness has significantly higher ratings than any other time of the year.

If i had to choose personal preference based on my viewership and fanhood, i would rank as follows:

1. NCAA Basketball
2. NFL
3. MLB
4. NBA (this used to be #1 or #2 until the Sonics got stolen)

and thats about it. I might start following the NHL if Seattle gets a team, but honestly i said the same thing when the Sounders joined the MLS and i barely if ever pay attention. Just not my cup of tea.

Birddog
01-22-2018, 05:32 AM
Attendance (sold seats) was down for the 3rd straight year last season, however if you count March madness it is about even. There is a lot of competition for the entertainment dollar. Movies are down significantly, where are people spending their $?
https://www.cbssports.com/college-basketball/news/college-hoops-attendance-dips-again-in-2016-17-kentucky-cuse-louisville-top-draws/

The top 20 are all schools with large arenas as you can see.