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YukonJack
03-11-2017, 12:47 PM
I think its a joke. Either you go straight to the draft from high school or just go professionally somewhere or you comit to college for four years or at least until your junior year assuming you have graduated. The game would be better and fans would have tighter attachment to the players. The good teams right now are just good, not great. I was thinking how great those UNLV teams were back in the early 90s. We will never have that greatness again. For one all of these Kentucky players would not go to Kentucky. Calipari would would ha e to actually recruit. Maybe for GU we would have never seen Collins or Daye, but as for everyone else I dont think anything else would have changed. The transfer rule is fine as is I think, but maybe you could add a stipulation that the transfer either happens as a hardship, or a coaching change. Just rambling, but the bottom line is that one and done just doesn't do it. It feels unearned and fake.

gonzagafan62
03-11-2017, 01:03 PM
I think nba and college would be a lot better if it went to something like:

A. You can go straight from high school
B. But if you went to college you must stay three years

sittingon50
03-11-2017, 01:13 PM
I think nba and college would be a lot better if it went to something like:

A. You can go straight from high school
B. But if you went to college you must stay three years

That's what college baseball does. My preference of the 2.

gonzagafan62
03-11-2017, 01:32 PM
That's what college baseball does. My preference of the 2.

Too much drafting on potential rather than actual skill.

I don't even know where Anthony Bennett is anymore. What a shame. The playing against better basketball athletes drives me nuts. Yeah sure sometimes that works. Only with the better athletes and players though that don't get demoralized easily. Need to work on their skill set in college. I hate watching NBA and not knowing where half the kids were before.

thespywhozaggedme
03-11-2017, 01:46 PM
That's what college baseball does. My preference of the 2.

Just to be clear, it's not college baseball, it's MLB. It's the pro leagues that say how long a player has to play college sports.

bartruff1
03-11-2017, 01:56 PM
A person should have the right to seek his own self interest....without restraint by some monopoly ...

tyko
03-11-2017, 02:17 PM
A person should have the right to seek his own self interest....without restraint by some monopoly ...

Correct. 100% agree.

All Weather Fan
03-11-2017, 02:20 PM
As a college basketball fan I would like it too if players went straight to the League out of high school or stayed in college for 2 - 3 years. However I totally agree with Bartruff1. Individuals should always be free to pursue their self interest whether athletes or top talents in any other field.

bartruff1
03-11-2017, 02:37 PM
There are plenty of professional soccer, golf, tennis, even hockey players that are in their early teens....Joe Nuxhall was 15 and pitched in the Majors..... I think the youngest NBA player was Bynum who was drafted at 17 and the youngest NFL player was 19...

I had a boy who was a professional snow boarder at 16 and traveled all over the world and was making about 15 times what I was...today he is a Electrical/Mechanical Engineer married 16 years with 3 sons...a home, a good job.and no debt !!!

MontanaCoyote
03-11-2017, 02:42 PM
Correct. 100% agree.

I just don't know if a 17 year old truly knows what's in their best long term interests. I know I sure didn't. I was being heavily scouted by the St. Louis Cardinals and Baltimore Orioles. Gave absolutely no thought to any thing else. Whoops,
I was going to buy a new Oldsmobile with my signing bonus. Just sayin.'


Taught high school seniors government for 30 years. This upper left on bulletin board; "I like you. you remind me of myself when I was young and stupid."

Could be different/better now. Just hope kids with real talent know enough to listen to advice from trusted family, friends.

zag buddy
03-11-2017, 02:46 PM
I didn't know my best choices at 17, but I made them.

sittingon50
03-11-2017, 04:33 PM
Just to be clear, it's not college baseball, it's MLB. It's the pro leagues that say how long a player has to play college sports.

Thanks spy. Your statement is more accurate.

DixieZag
03-11-2017, 04:41 PM
I'm for more empowerment of the student/player, not less.

As it is, the NCAA has all the power and $$$, followed closely by the coaches.

gonzagafan62
03-11-2017, 05:51 PM
I'm for more empowerment of the student/player, not less.

As it is, the NCAA has all the power and $$$, followed closely by the coaches.

They'd still have the power. Actually they'd have more in my scenario. The good ones - that is.

MDABE80
03-11-2017, 06:08 PM
In the present culture, there's no controlling it unless the NBA does. Of course kids can spend a year or two playing in Japan , China or one of those. NBA has the say on this. They're a private corp.
When the kid's 20 or so, he's welcome back.....if he's worthy.
Lots of kids who are one and done, don't make it though. It's their choice. Gas station jobs. Or a 7-11 o something better ( I hope). They can always return to college to get a degree and join the rest of us!! Freedom!!

Malastein
03-11-2017, 06:43 PM
Well, I think that currently the rules are set up quite poorly as I think there's really no legislation actually looking out for the best interest of the individual. When a guy like LeBron James comes along and can waltz into the league and average 20-5-5 his first season then I think the rules are limiting him from properly developing. However, there's plenty of guys who would develop better in the college game and could've had productive careers by flailed around the league in bad developmental situations because they weren't naturally talented enough to make it. I think there needs to be a best interest recommendation that would keep some people in college longer by the consensus of talent evaluators which maybe expires after their sophomore season.

DixieZag
03-11-2017, 06:45 PM
In the present culture, there's no controlling it unless the NBA does. Of course kids can spend a year or two playing in Japan , China or one of those. NBA has the say on this. They're a private corp.
When the kid's 20 or so, he's welcome back.....if he's worthy.
Lots of kids who are one and done, don't make it though. It's their choice. Gas station jobs. Or a 7-11 o something better ( I hope). They can always return to college to get a degree and join the rest of us!! Freedom!!

Good point, true.

Perhaps more cooperation between the two entities, but when it gets right down to it, you're right.

RenoZag
03-22-2018, 05:06 AM
LINK: http://www.espn.com/mens-college-basketball/story/_/id/22860872/big-east-replace-1-done-2-none



The Big East has recommended replacing one-and-done with a two-or-none policy in college basketball, along with NCAA regulation of agents and the creation of an elite player unit to focus on "players with realistic aspirations of playing in the NBA."

The Big East's recommendations come a week after a similar report by the Pac-12 for the NCAA's commission on college basketball, led by former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice. The commission was created in response to a federal investigation into corruption in college basketball.

The Big East's plan calls for the elimination of the NBA's one-and-done rule, which prohibits its teams from drafting players until they are at least 19 or a year removed from high school.

Two-or-none would be an NCAA policy requiring basketball players who decide to go to college to commit for at least two seasons. Meanwhile, high school players who declare for the NBA draft would forfeit future college eligibility.



As MDABE points out above, unless the NBA Player's Association changes the rules in their CBA, the status quo will abide.

CDC84
03-22-2018, 09:00 AM
I think its a joke. Either you go straight to the draft from high school or just go professionally somewhere or you comit to college for four years or at least until your junior year assuming you have graduated. The game would be better and fans would have tighter attachment to the players. The good teams right now are just good, not great. I was thinking how great those UNLV teams were back in the early 90s. We will never have that greatness again. For one all of these Kentucky players would not go to Kentucky. Calipari would would ha e to actually recruit. Maybe for GU we would have never seen Collins or Daye, but as for everyone else I dont think anything else would have changed. The transfer rule is fine as is I think, but maybe you could add a stipulation that the transfer either happens as a hardship, or a coaching change. Just rambling, but the bottom line is that one and done just doesn't do it. It feels unearned and fake.

The problem isn't one and done. It's the NBA rookie salary cap that was instituted in the mid-90's. It's responsible for 70% of the problems in high school, college and NBA basketball. The only way these issues will ever be fixed is to junk it. Getting rid of the rookie salary cap allows kids to go pro right from high school if they want to, but it puts economic incentives in place for players to go to and remain in school. You get the best of both worlds.

That great UNLV team you are describing, which started three senior lottery picks in 1991, was before the cap era. No one dared to enter the draft until they were a fully developed prospect. That's why you never saw high schoolers come out because a team could draft the kid and offer him only $75,000 a year if they wanted to. Whereas a fully developed prospect like Larry Johnson, within one year of graduating from UNLV, landed the most lucrative contract in NBA history. Why? The market commanded it. He could've held out.......and someone else would have eventually paid him big money.

The NBA is never going to get rid of the one and done. This is why:

http://www.sportingnews.com/nba/news/nba-mock-draft-2018-one-and-done-rule-bagley-ayton-lebron-durant-analysis-news/lboc9ymq69dn1s3c7uff6ul6c

The NBA has made a fortune since instituting the one and done. The composition of this season's NBA all-star team shows that kids even playing one year of college basketball has as an impact on their development and them becoming household names before they enter the league:


2. Development

Following the introduction of the rookie salary cap in advance of the 1995 draft — which drastically reduced the incentive for prospects to enter the league as polished products who could command contracts on the order of Glenn Robinson (10 years, $112 million in 2017 dollars) — Garnett filed for early entry and became the No. 5 overall pick.

His eventual success made the practice more common, enough so that by the time the age limit was introduced there had been 40 players to enter the draft directly out of high school. Nearly all of those players ranked with the elite prospects in their high school classes. Seven were rated the No. 1 prospect in their respective classes.

Only nine of the preps-to-pros prospects were eventually chosen to participate in at least one NBA All-Star Game.

Of the 28 players selected for the 2018 NBA All-Star Game, 11 entered the draft as one-and-done prospects.

"We’re really not equipped to develop them at the NBA level," one Eastern Conference scout told SN. "We would have to invest much more into the G League staff to do the same work. We take for granted what they get taught in college."

The evidence shows that players who enter the NBA after a year of college rather than directly out of high school are better prepared to handle all that comes with being a pro, including the game of basketball.

North Carolina coach Roy Williams is in the position that might lead him to complain bitterly about the one-and-done rule. He has coached only two such players since the rule was introduced more than a decade ago, and rival Duke most likely will have four from this year’s team alone. Instead, Williams is most disturbed at how the reaction to the age limit has been "sensationalized" and would prefer those examining the rule to look at the facts.

"Tell me if there are as many mistakes as there were before. The answer is NO," Williams said. "Have the kids benefited from college a year? Most of them, yeah. Have they been hurt by it? Most of them NO. That’s the reality of it."

To get a sharper picture of the difference in the performance of one-and-done players vs. those from the preps-to-pros era, Sporting News looked for a fair sample size of early career development among each group. So we took those who entered the draft between 2007 and 2012 and examined their first six seasons as pros. Then we worked backward from 2005, the last draft in which high school players could enter, and examined the six prior draft classes to see how the preps-to-pros performed in their first six seasons.

The sample of players drafted in the age-limit period was larger: 52 one-and-dones as compared to 34 preps-to-pros. But the success of those who’d played in college was significantly greater.

Some of the key points:

— Only three of the preps who entered between 2000-05 were selected for the NBA All-Star Game in their first six seasons, for a total of nine appearances. Four of those were by LeBron James. Ten of the collegians were chosen as All-Stars a total of 21 times.
— The preps played in an average of 215 games in those six years and produced an average of 2,462 total points. The collegians played in 247 games and produced 2,957 points.
— Slightly less than 62 percent of the preps appeared in the playoffs in their first six seasons, for an average of 19 games total. The collegians’ percentage of playoff participants was 69 percent for an average of 18 games.
— 82 percent of the high school entrants played in the NBA, compared to 90 percent of the collegians.
— 26 percent of the high schoolers could be considered "busts," compared to 21 percent of collegians.

In addition to the fact that they don't want to pay for a legit minor league system where rosters are held intact throughout the entire season and players are competing in games that truly matter. The NBA doesn't want a baseball minor league system because baseball may have "teams," but it's essentially an individual sport between a pitcher and a batter. If this weren't the case, we wouldn't see September call-ups, which wreck minor league teams who are competing for championships. Whereas in basketball, five guys often need to do 2 things in the span of 8 seconds in order for one of them to get a half-second open look at a 15 foot jumper. Having a roster intact that is playing in games that really matter to fans......games that lead toward a playoff system and a championship is a critical part of the process of player development in a team sport. That is how the NBA guys view it, although they will never tell you that.

Although this article comes from 1998, I highly recommend that anyone who hates the one and done read it as it is the definitive article on why the NBA's rookie salary cap might be the worst rule that any professional sports organization has implemented in the past 30 years. It's responsible for so many of the game's problems.....including some of the corruption we have seen recently:

http://www.enquirer.com/editions/1998/05/10/cap10.html