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SLOZag
08-21-2015, 09:27 AM
Interesting piece about a CBSSports.com survey of nearly 100 coaches done in the past three weeks:

"Michigan basketball coach John Beilein has a reputation for being a unique offensive mind. According to a survey of his peers, he's the best offensive mind in the country. ... Beilein's two-guard offense revolves around a four out one in structure and is heavily reliant on three-pointers and back cuts. ... The rest of the top five: Davidson's Bob McKillop (his offense is off ball screens), Wisconsin's Bo Ryan (swing offense), Gonzaga's Mark Few (no set structure) and Duke's Mike Krzyzewski (adapts to personnel). Aside from Few, who is 52, Beilein is one of the youngsters in this group at 62 years old."

Possible conversation starter: Would you prefer your coach to have an established "style" or "formula", and to draft kids to fit it? Or would you prefer your coach to adapt the program to fit the best kids he can accumulate?

TheGonzagaFactor
08-21-2015, 11:13 AM
Interesting piece about a CBSSports.com survey of nearly 100 coaches done in the past three weeks:

"Michigan basketball coach John Beilein has a reputation for being a unique offensive mind. According to a survey of his peers, he's the best offensive mind in the country. ... Beilein's two-guard offense revolves around a four out one in structure and is heavily reliant on three-pointers and back cuts. ... The rest of the top five: Davidson's Bob McKillop (his offense is off ball screens), Wisconsin's Bo Ryan (swing offense), Gonzaga's Mark Few (no set structure) and Duke's Mike Krzyzewski (adapts to personnel). Aside from Few, who is 52, Beilein is one of the youngsters in this group at 62 years old."

Possible conversation starter: Would you prefer your coach to have an established "style" or "formula", and to draft kids to fit it? Or would you prefer your coach to adapt the program to fit the best kids he can accumulate?



I'll always choose to adapt the program. That way you keep opposing coaches on their toes more often and you aren't doomed to a losing season if a certain type of player isn't available. Both routes have their downfalls, but I see them as less damaging if you can adapt to your personnel. It shows a common trait of a great coach: being able to adjust on the fly.

When I was in HS our football coach loved to pass the ball a lot, but my senior year the team was built to be a running team (best RB at our classification, two other really good RBs, a good running QB with a mega arm, experienced OL, no TE, no WRs). The coach still chose to pass the ball a lot, partly because his soph. son was a (awful) QB and partly because he was a QB in college. I just HATED how he knew for at least 2 years what kind of personnel we would have and he refused to change up the system. I'd run into opposing players later on in college and they all said they were glad our RB only got 7-10 carries per game as we committed suicide by throwing the ball 20+ times. Opponents would ask me why we never ran the ball even though we succeeded at it. This was infuriating.

It doesn't matter now, but that experience (and a similar one with the school's basketball team) just convinced me that it's best to adapt to personnel, ESPECIALLY in HS/sub-power 5 NCAA where you have much less control over the makeup of your roster.

LongIslandZagFan
08-21-2015, 11:25 AM
I am trying to figure out the difference between no set structure and adapting to personnel.

DixieZag
08-21-2015, 11:28 AM
I love how Few adapts and does what we are best suited for, not trying to suit what we have to him.

I recall early on, when we had far less athleticism, we did lots of backdoor cuts with the focus on ball movement.

Since we've been so dominant with the bigs, we've concentrated on getting it inside, even with having Pangos and Wiltjer ready to rain down from above.

Last year, against WSU, the Cougs just couldn't stop Karno. The ball just continued to go down low, no point in doing anything different. I love that Few will just adjust himself, works so well.

MickMick
08-21-2015, 11:41 AM
Few has made several offensive transitions....all a product of what he has to work with. Lately, he has a lot more to work with.

Originally, motion and flex offense which slowly transitioned to more of an up tempo transition game (reflecting upon the improving athleticism of each successive squad), until Few finally begins habitually landing offensively skilled big men. Lately, his offensive game is centered upon getting the ball down low, as a base offense, with everything else a spin off from that.

His offensive philosophy can be best described as "Do what your roster does best".