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View Full Version : Twitter: Not always a recruit's best friend.



SLOZag
04-05-2015, 04:46 PM
Obviously, there has been a lot (some might say an excess amount) of discussion here about this or that recruit's Twittering. Here's a pretty thoughtful newspaper article on the topic that is worth considering if you have a dog in that "discussion", one way or another:

http://usatodayhss.com/2015/one-bad-tweet-can-be-costly-to-a-student-athlete-8

Sample: "A college coach recruiting two of his Fairport High School boys basketball players called to say how much he liked what he saw after watching them play an AAU game, and that he thought both were good enough to see court time on his team as freshmen. “But we’re going to stop recruiting one of them,” the college coach said. Stunned, Fitch asked why. “We found his Twitter account, looked through it and some of what we saw isn’t representative of what our university is about,” the recruiter explained."

One more: "Ron Whitcomb Jr., ... an assistant football coach at Old Dominion University, said he’ll research a recruit’s social media presence before he even makes any contact with the player ... .
“You’ve got to dig through all the avenues you can,” said Whitcomb, 30, who is ODU’s recruiting coordinator. He’ll check for a Facebook profile, Twitter and now Instagram — all tools he may later use to keep in touch with the player. Recently, ODU stopped recruiting a quarterback because it didn’t like what it found on his Facebook profile. There was vulgar language, some pictures with the player posing with his tongue out. “He looked like Miley Cyrus,” Whitcomb said. “That can’t be the face of your team (as a QB).” Another “turn-off,” Whitcomb said, was finding a player posted too often for ODU’s taste. “Sixteen posts a day? He was on social media too much,” he said. “Is he spending enough time on important stuff?” Anything that’s racially insensitive or sexist is also a red flag, he said. Old Dominion, he said, is probably one of about 10 college football teams that doesn’t allow its players to post on Twitter. Whitcomb doesn’t want to come off as “holier than thou,” he said, but he wants teens to know these are factors recruiters watch when evaluating a player’s character.

In late July, Penn State stopped recruiting a [football] player because of social media. “Actually glad I got to see the ‘real’ person before offered him,” tweeted offensive line coach Herb Hand ... . Hand later elaborated to an online publication, 247sports.com, saying: “If a guy makes the decision to post or (retweet) stuff that degrades women, references drug use or cyber-bullying crap, then I can make the decision to drop them, especially if I have discussed it with them prior, and especially in today’s climate of athletics.”"

hooter73
04-05-2015, 05:09 PM
Hard lesson but kids better learn it early. Employers have been doing the same for years now.

Incidentally, Jesse Wade has one of the best twitter histories ever. Love that kid!

webspinnre
04-05-2015, 05:50 PM
I always do a quick social media look before hiring anybody. Just good business practice.

CDC84
04-05-2015, 05:55 PM
Unfortunately, I have heard of some employers not hiring people simply because they didn't have a social media presence on the internet.

It's almost as if these kids are expected to be on twitter, even if they don't want to be.

ZagaZags
04-05-2015, 05:58 PM
Obviously, there has been a lot (some might say an excess amount) of discussion here about this or that recruit's Twittering. Here's a pretty thoughtful newspaper article on the topic that is worth considering if you have a dog in that "discussion", one way or another:

http://usatodayhss.com/2015/one-bad-tweet-can-be-costly-to-a-student-athlete-8

Sample: "A college coach recruiting two of his Fairport High School boys basketball players called to say how much he liked what he saw after watching them play an AAU game, and that he thought both were good enough to see court time on his team as freshmen. “But we’re going to stop recruiting one of them,” the college coach said. Stunned, Fitch asked why. “We found his Twitter account, looked through it and some of what we saw isn’t representative of what our university is about,” the recruiter explained."

One more: "Ron Whitcomb Jr., ... an assistant football coach at Old Dominion University, said he’ll research a recruit’s social media presence before he even makes any contact with the player ... .
“You’ve got to dig through all the avenues you can,” said Whitcomb, 30, who is ODU’s recruiting coordinator. He’ll check for a Facebook profile, Twitter and now Instagram — all tools he may later use to keep in touch with the player. Recently, ODU stopped recruiting a quarterback because it didn’t like what it found on his Facebook profile. There was vulgar language, some pictures with the player posing with his tongue out. “He looked like Miley Cyrus,” Whitcomb said. “That can’t be the face of your team (as a QB).” Another “turn-off,” Whitcomb said, was finding a player posted too often for ODU’s taste. “Sixteen posts a day? He was on social media too much,” he said. “Is he spending enough time on important stuff?” Anything that’s racially insensitive or sexist is also a red flag, he said. Old Dominion, he said, is probably one of about 10 college football teams that doesn’t allow its players to post on Twitter. Whitcomb doesn’t want to come off as “holier than thou,” he said, but he wants teens to know these are factors recruiters watch when evaluating a player’s character.

In late July, Penn State stopped recruiting a [football] player because of social media. “Actually glad I got to see the ‘real’ person before offered him,” tweeted offensive line coach Herb Hand ... . Hand later elaborated to an online publication, 247sports.com, saying: “If a guy makes the decision to post or (retweet) stuff that degrades women, references drug use or cyber-bullying crap, then I can make the decision to drop them, especially if I have discussed it with them prior, and especially in today’s climate of athletics.”"

When we hear about a new recruit, I think most of us check out the social media on that recruit. Sometimes a few don't pass the eye test. That being said, most of them are great. April will be an interesting month. ( I can't be the only one who sees this.)

cggonzaga
04-05-2015, 06:52 PM
I don't know what is worse, kids saying stupid stuff on social media or middle aged men and women following said kids and writing on internet board forums about them. Leave it to the staffs and universities to make decisions on these kids.

webspinnre
04-05-2015, 07:00 PM
I don't know what is worse, kids saying stupid stuff on social media or middle aged men and women following said kids and writing on internet board forums about them. Leave it to the staffs and universities to make decisions on these kids.

You're right, let's never speculate on any aspect of a recruit from now on, we'll just leave it to the staff and university. This is a message board, pretty much what these sorts of things are for.

That being said, following recruits on twitter is a bit more than I'd be doing.

ZagaZags
04-05-2015, 07:06 PM
If you ever check out this recruiting site, it lists all recruits for all NCAA schools. Twitter just so happens to come with this recruiting site for each recruit. Maybe we shouldn't look at recruiting sites either.

http://verbalcommits.com/schools/gonzaga

willandi
04-05-2015, 07:39 PM
I don't do any searches for recruits, other than what I see and read about here and on ESPN. But what I have read about some would make me not wish that recruit to be a Zag. Much like the question when DT Hardy was a free agent (NFL) and supposedly was going to talk to the Seahawks. Many in the Seattle media questioned whether the fans would accept a player with that kind of baggage, no matter how good.

There is a difference, in my mind, of somebody needing/wanting a second chance, and current behavior too, but I will leave the vetting up to the Staff and team. If they are all right with someone, I will surely trust their judgement.