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View Full Version : OT - Time to change timeout rule?



CDC84
01-11-2015, 03:33 PM
http://www.sportingnews.com/ncaa-basketball/story/2015-01-11/notre-dame-virginia-timeout-mike-brey-jerian-grant

I prefer the FIBA rule where you can only call a timeout when the ball is dead.

DixieZag
01-11-2015, 03:45 PM
Interesting.

I wonder if there is a way to take away the ability to call timeout as a means of saving oneself from the defense but preserving the ability to take a timeout to set up the offense, as when they will dribble across half court and call a t.0. to set up a play? It would be hard. But, if there was something about how a player who is "engaged" by the defender (kind of like the five second rule), weave it into this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Five-second_rule_(basketball)


A five second closely guarded violation may be called against an offensive player with the ball when that player is guarded closely for five seconds or more and does not pass, shoot, or dribble within that time. Under NCAA men's rules, to be considered "closely guarded", a defender must be guarding a player who is located in the frontcourt and within six (6) feet of the player.[2] The count applies to a player who is either holding or dribbling the ball. This allows for multiple closely guarded counts to occur. NCAA women's rules require the defender to be within three (3) feet and can occur anywhere on the playing court, but only applies when the offensive player is holding the ball.[3] A count ends whenever the player with the ball gets his head and shoulders past the defender, the defender is no longer within the required distance, the same defender does not continuously closely guard the player in control of the ball, or another opponent is between the defender and the ball.[4]

I would like to hear what others think. I like it if a player can't be saved, but I also like a coaches ability to set up plays.

zag buddy
01-11-2015, 04:18 PM
I like it. It's like excellent defenders get their defense nullified by the time out. The better your defense the more this new rule will help.

seacatfan
01-11-2015, 04:33 PM
To play devil's advocate, if you have to use TO's to "save" a ball handler from tough defense, you are burning TO's you wont' have available later to set you offense or defense or otherwise do some strategizing.

23dpg
01-11-2015, 04:36 PM
I'd rather just reduce the amount of timeouts from 6 in a game to 2 each half.
It archaic to have so many, especially with a tv timeout every 4 minutes of game time.

KStyles
01-11-2015, 05:46 PM
I don't mind the current rule.

CDC84
01-11-2015, 06:44 PM
Another reason why I like the idea of changing the rule: floor scrums. College basketball players (both on offense and defense) and coaches are too often granted timeouts when they clearly don't have possession of the ball on the floor. Not having to worry about timeouts would allow the refs to focus more on body contact that takes place far too often during floor scrums. A floor scrum is not supposed to resemble a fumble during a football game with players piling on top of one another.

During yesterday's Iowa State/WVU game, there was a floor scrum where the ref was more tuned into the Iowa State coach and whether or not he would call a TO than the action on the floor. WVU tied the ball up well before Hoiberg signaled for the timeout.

seacatfan
01-11-2015, 06:57 PM
Another reason why I like the idea of changing the rule: floor scrums. College basketball players (both on offense and defense) and coaches are too often granted timeouts when they clearly don't have possession of the ball on the floor. Not having to worry about timeouts would allow the refs to focus more on body contact that takes place far too often during floor scrums. A floor scrum is not supposed to resemble a fumble during a football game with players piling on top of one another.

During yesterday's Iowa State/WVU game, there was a floor scrum where the ref was more tuned into the Iowa State coach and whether or not he would call a TO than the action on the floor. WVU tied the ball up well before Hoiberg signaled for the timeout.

I agree with you on that. If either 1) a player doesn't have control of the ball or 2) multiple players have control of it simultaneously, I don't understand how a TO can be granted. Also agree that scrums can get out of control and players can get away with way too much physical contact.

WallaWallaZag
01-11-2015, 11:47 PM
i prefer a middle-ground...only player in possession of the ball can call the TO...no coaches from the sideline except on dead ball situations.

jbslicer
01-12-2015, 03:34 AM
I'd like to see a rule where you can't call a timeout after a made basket. The ball shouldn't be dead and you don't have possession.
Also too many timeouts. Up to 12 in the second half.

Bogozags
01-12-2015, 04:26 AM
The ball is dead as soon as it travels through a basket and becomes live again when it is touched on the ensuing inbounds play. A time out can be called only when Team A has the ball or during a dead ball.

I have played under International Rules (FIBA) and strategy is different when using your time outs, which can ONLY be called during a dead ball. A time out cannot save a team when trying to cross half court, which is imo the way it should be...this is the only change I would make to NCAA rules...