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View Full Version : Loss to Panama eliminates U.S. from medal round contention



SageOfZagville
07-27-2007, 07:57 AM
While this is sad and a bit shocking, most of the other teams have older players.

http://sports.espn.go.com/oly/news/story?id=2950961

deathchina
07-27-2007, 09:05 AM
Look for the US to win the gold medal in the olympics this year.

And as mediocre as we've been in recent senior men's team events, wouldn't you still put money on the US? If the US doesn't have the best basketball team anymore, who does? Spain? Argentina? Would you rather bet 10 grand on Argentina winning the gold medal or the US?

It used to be that I would have taken the US versus the rest of the field. Perhaps those days are over, but I still think we have the best team year in and year out.

BobZag
07-27-2007, 11:09 AM
Did anyone notice that the US is sending Northern Iowa to Bangkok for the World University Games, as opposed to an all-star collection of players? It will be interesting to see how that works.

Theo begins tryout camp today in Vancouver for Canada. The roster will be announced July 31st.

zagco
07-27-2007, 11:18 AM
If the US even medals in the Olympics, we'll be lucky. Professional basketball in the United States, and even a lot of amatuer level hoops, has turned into a professional wrestling of sorts. No one really plays the game anymore in America. That's why we lose in international play. They play the game better than we do, and we certainly do not have the market cornered on "athletic" people.

deathchina
07-27-2007, 12:42 PM
"If the US even medals in the Olympics, we'll be lucky."

Considering we've medaled in 5 of the last 6 major international competitions (olympics and world championships), I find this statement to be pretty ignorant. The lone exception to this rule was the 2002 world championships, where we sent a roster that was ill-prepared and lacked any of our major talents. Antonio Davis, Michael Finley, Raef Lafrentz, Andre Miller, Jay Williams, Nick Collison and a 37 year old Reggie Miller aren't anywhere close to the best players this country can offer. Also, the committee did a TERRIBLE job picking players that would suit the international style of play.


If anyone wants to propose a team that should be favored over the US, I'm all ears. Who would you propose Zagco?

BBskorer
07-27-2007, 01:40 PM
Did anyone notice that the US is sending Northern Iowa to Bangkok for the World University Games, as opposed to an all-star collection of players? It will be interesting to see how that works.I like it. University competition....send a university team. Solid squad from a solid conference. Guys who know each other's games. Good luck to the "USA Panthers".
Theo begins tryout camp today in Vancouver for Canada. The roster will be announced July 31st.According to this (http://wasssports.blogspot.com/2007/07/canadas-student-team-reassembles-in.html), there's 14 trying out for 12 spots, so on the blind, it's 85%. Throw in the positive comments Theo got during last month's training. And his hops...

CDC84
07-27-2007, 01:45 PM
http://www.sportingnews.com/yourturn/viewtopic.php?t=246392

USA Basketball must abandon tryouts
Mike Decourcy, The Sporting News
July 27, 2007

The United States will play one more game at the Pan American Games, but it'll just be for exercise and, as they say at the depths in sports, for pride.

Perhaps while those 40 minutes of emptiness are transpiring, the folks at USA Basketball can ponder the changes screaming to be made with the nation's youth programs.

They have redesigned the senior men's program into something that has a chance to work, that ought to work. The structure of the youth teams all but guarantees failure, though. USA Basketball continues to rely on poorly designed tryout camps to select teams that will represent the nation in important international competitions.

The Pan-Am team followed the broken model of inviting a few dozen players to tryouts, playing a few days of pickup games and then having a blue-ribbon panel of college coaches choose the team.

So the players who must perform in international competition are selected based not on suitability for that competition, or even on their talents and accomplishments, but on how good they are at going end to end with few set plays or designed defenses. Very little attention apparently is paid to whether the players' skills fit into the international game, where zone defense is more common.

This time, it seems, no attention was paid to whether players' skills overlap. Three players were chosen who are, essentially, undersized shooting guards: Scottie Reynolds of Villanova, Drew Neitzel of Michigan State and Derrick Low of Washington State. None has been as dangerous or proficient a deep shooter as Tennessee's Chris Lofton -- who averaged more than 20 points per game last season -- but Lofton was released because he performed poorly in the tryout.

It seems no attention was paid to the limited value of low-skilled frontcourt players. The U.S. took both Joey Dorsey and James Gist to Brazil; neither excels at low-post scoring or face-up shooting. They are athletic rebounders and defenders. Defensive rebounding is different with the internationals because so many more jumpshots are taken, which creates more long rebounds -- which is why 6-2 Patrick Beverley grabbed as many (48) in nine games at the U-19s as 6-10 Mike Beasley.

It seems no attention was paid to the limited value of non-shooting point guards. Kyle Weaver is a terrific college basketball player for Washington State. Eric Maynor still is a hero for his March play at Virginia Commonwealth. But coach Jay Wright can't find an excuse to play them, even as Neitzel and Reynolds struggle to make shots or control the ball.

The U.S. had a chance to take along elite defenders (Wes Matthews, Mario Chalmers, Jerel McNeal), skilled frontcourt players (Brandon Costner, Tasmin Mitchell, Jon Brockman) and capable shooters (Lofton, Bryce Taylor, Josh Carter) but left all of them home. A few tough days should not have made the difference.

The way to make this better is to install someone as U.S. youth international coach. He could spend the year scouting American players for their suitability to play in the U-19s or the Pan-Ams, then put together the team based on suitability and availability. He presumably would have a strong understanding of what it takes to win internationally.

The teams that beat the U.S. down in Brazil are older, but filled with mid-level former NCAA players, including Martin Osimani of Duquesne (Uruguay) and Danilo Pinnock of George Washington (Panama).

Brazil and Argentina did not field their strongest teams in the Pan-Ams. It would have been possible for the U.S. to win this tournament. It certainly would have been possible for the Americans to win in this tournament.