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Zag 77
10-10-2012, 09:50 AM
(Mods, feel free to move this wherever it fits.)

Guys from my generation will remember Karras as a guy who succesfully made the transition away from football and was a pretty darned good football commentator. He did a stint on Monday Night Football and was not afraid to argue with Howard Cossell. An under-rated character actor, his most memorable movie role was as "Mongo" in " Blazing Saddles."

http://movieclips.com/edVUm-blazing-saddles-movie-mongo-comes-to-town/

LongIslandZagFan
10-10-2012, 11:36 AM
(Mods, feel free to move this wherever it fits.)

Guys from my generation will remember Karras as a guy who succesfully made the transition away from football and was a pretty darned good football commentator. He did a stint on Monday Night Football and was not afraid to argue with Howard Cossell. An under-rated character actor, his most memorable movie role was as "Mongo" in " Blazing Saddles."

http://movieclips.com/edVUm-blazing-saddles-movie-mongo-comes-to-town/

Mongo just pawn in game of life.


RIP Alex.

HillBillyZag
10-10-2012, 12:46 PM
Alex Karras was one of the best lineman to wear the Detroit Lions Silver & Blue. As Zag 77 stated, he was great as a football announcer and a pretty good actor too. I've read and heard he possessed a great sense of humor and did'nt take himself too seriously. I loved him as James Garners friend and body guard in " Victor/Victoria " with the late ,great, Robert Preston. This flic was a riot! RIP-#77.

gamagin
10-10-2012, 01:07 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8_RKPGS2vwM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SKRma7PDW10

treehorn
10-10-2012, 01:37 PM
Karras was named to four Pro Bowls, and he was a member of the N.F.L’s All-Decade team of the 1960s. He was never elected to the Hall of Fame, however, an oversight that has sometimes been attributed to the fact that the Lions fielded mostly undistinguished teams during his tenure; in Karras’s only playoff game, the Lions lost to the Dallas Cowboys by the unlikely score of 5-0 in 1970.

But another theory is that his unwillingness to be an obedient N.F.L. citizen — especially his antagonism toward the longtime N.F.L. commissioner Pete Rozelle — resulted in an unofficial blackballing.

Witty, brash and probably smarter than your average bear (or Lion or Packer or Giant, for that matter), Karras was, throughout his career, a thorn in the side of league authorities, speaking out against team owners in general and the Lions’ management in particular. He deplored the way players were treated like chattel on the one hand, deployed as seen fit, and children on the other, held to restrictive behavioral standards, scolded and disciplined.

New York Times (http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/11/sports/football/alex-karras-nfl-lineman-and-actor-dies-at-77.html?hp)

Terrible that he suffered from dementia at the end, like so many former NFL stars.

ZagLawGrad
10-10-2012, 06:09 PM
And dont forget Alex and George Plimpton

MDABE80
10-10-2012, 06:17 PM
ZagLaw...I remember that very fondly. Just a good guy. Fun, burley...good guy all around. Saddest is the dementia. I wonder why this is such a surprise. Multiple truama to the head........even with helmets...seems like these people will eventually get chronic damage.
Not like in HS where a kid gets a pop or there and then moves on the flag FB . It's a tragedy this dementia...........I wonder how the owners will avoid this. I wonder what'll happen if this problem isn't solved.

MickMick
10-10-2012, 09:57 PM
Read the book, "Instant Replay" by Jerry Kramer, All Pro guard for the Green Bay Packers (coached by Vince Lombardi).

Jerry Kramer played against Merlin Olsen of the Ram's "Fearsome Foursome". He played against the Colt's Bubba Smith. He played against Jethro Pugh of the Dallas Cowboys. He played against Charlie Krueger of the San Francisco Forty Niners. He played against Alan Page and Gary Larsen of the Minnesota Vikings "Purple People Eaters".

In his book, he says that Alex Karris was the best defensive lineman he had faced in his entire career.

Karris wasn't just an actor. He was the dominate NFL interior tackle of his time. I will say, though, that Alan Page took the role shortly thereafter. Page peaked after Kramer had retired. Alan Page was just an incredible player.

These were the players I watched as a boy. Merlin Olsen, Deacon Jones, Johnny Unitas, Bart Starr, Dick Butkus, Jim Brown, Mike Ditka, Dick Labeau,..........Alex Karris.

Zag365
10-11-2012, 08:02 AM
For Detroiters of my generation, Karras was a much beloved local sports figure. He was part of a great Lions defense (one of the original groups tagged with the "Fearsome Foursome" moniker -- Brown, McCord, Williams, and Karras -- before it became associated with L.A. Rams Olsen, Grier, and company). Unfortunately, in the early '60s the Lions offense wasn't as stellar as the defense and the greatness of those teams was overshadowed by the ascendancy of the GB Packers. The Lions were always a second or third place team in the early '60s after winning the championship in 1957 (and they have never been back since). The defense also had Joe Schmidt ("56") at MLB, who I consider better than Sam Huff of his era, but Huff played for the NY football Giants and got more pub. The Lions also had Wayne Walker at OLB (can't remember the other side) plus an all-Pro secondary of Lane, Lebeau, Larry, and Lowe (and later Lem Barney) that was outstanding.

Even before Blazing Saddles and some tv stuff, Karras did a number of local commercials and appeared as a guest on shows where he willingly played a funny, self-depricating jock. Not sure who I'd compare him to in Zag lore. Maybe Calvary, Batista, Turiaf -- long-time fan favorite who performed well, didn't have large ego, and came across as an accessible guy that would be fun to have a conversation with.