PDA

View Full Version : OT: There are lines that shouldn't be crossed as fans



LongIslandZagFan
10-08-2012, 07:31 AM
I would love to think this would never happen at GU or on this board... Just sickening and classless no matter what how you try to justify it.

Chief fans cheer own QB's injury. (http://www.arrowheadpride.com/2012/10/7/3470224/eric-winston-quotes-matt-cassel-injury-fans-cheering)

ETA... I'll move it to other sports section later but thought it should get some eyes over here first.

OregonZag5
10-08-2012, 08:26 AM
I truely hope we never never seen anything like this on our board. From my standpoint, we already have too much negativity.

zagitup
10-08-2012, 08:54 AM
I remember 2-3 years ago some moron on this board was openly wishing for Meech to blow a knee out so he'd have to sit and force Few to play someone else at PG.

I also remember legions of us here running that guy off the board on a rail. It was a good thing tar and feathers weren't handy. I was never prouder to be a Zag fan than that day.

ridgebackzag
10-08-2012, 09:40 AM
Mob mentality.

gozagswoohoo
10-08-2012, 10:10 AM
That's ridiculous.

Gonzdb8
10-08-2012, 12:39 PM
While I agree with the general sentiment I think there is probably more to consider here. The NFL has created a product that absolutely glorifies violence. In fact, thats the basis of many of the lawsuits now facing the league. Now, i'm a huge fan of football (go Texans!), but it is what it is, a game that rewards those who can most effectively brutalize their opponents during a frantic game of land grab. Fans are socialized to cheer and go nuts when a particularly vicious hit is put on an opposing player so is it really that surprising that a fans conditioning spills over to cheering when a player from their team who is under performing takes a hard hit and then leaves the game? Add to the mix the huge amounts of alcohol consumed before and after the games and this simply doesn't surprise me at all. Why have none of you ever spoken up when fans cheer over an opposing player going down? When Patty Mills got hurt against us in K2 a couple years ago there were more than a few Zag fans in the stands high-fiving (i was there, i saw it) but there wasn't any outrage on our boards over it (at least not that i can remember).
So again, i get the sentiment and agree with it in principle that we should not cheer when anyone gets injured, but we simply should not be surprised about it or feign shock given the nature of the game and what its evolved into.

LongIslandZagFan
10-08-2012, 12:55 PM
While I agree with the general sentiment I think there is probably more to consider here. The NFL has created a product that absolutely glorifies violence. In fact, thats the basis of many of the lawsuits now facing the league. Now, i'm a huge fan of football (go Texans!), but it is what it is, a game that rewards those who can most effectively brutalize their opponents during a frantic game of land grab. Fans are socialized to cheer and go nuts when a particularly vicious hit is put on an opposing player so is it really that surprising that a fans conditioning spills over to cheering when a player from their team who is under performing takes a hard hit and then leaves the game? Add to the mix the huge amounts of alcohol consumed before and after the games and this simply doesn't surprise me at all. Why have none of you ever spoken up when fans cheer over an opposing player going down? When Patty Mills got hurt agains us in K2 a couple years ago there were more than a few Zag fans in the stands high-fiving (i was there, i saw it) but there wasn't any outrage on our boards over it (at least not that i can remember).
So again, i get the sentiment and agree with it in principle that we should not cheer when anyone gets injured, but we simply should not be surprised about it or feign shock given the nature of the game and what its evolved into.

Not sure your read the article. The player acknowledges much of what yoy say. Fans have every right to cheer even boo their own players. No doubt. But in the end these guys are just playing a game and nobody should rejoice injuries of ANY player let alone one of their own players. Honestly, I've been to a few NFL games and I've never ever seen or heard people rejoicing when an opposing player got hurt. More often than not... The place gets very quiet typically. By not being shocked one is the problem and not the solution. You SHOULD be shocked... It's classless and wrong.

Gonzdb8
10-08-2012, 02:56 PM
yeah, i read the article, not sure what you meant by that comment. but i certainly don't think i'm "part of the problem" because i chose to make a criticism of violence in american sports and culture anymore than i think someone who directs their outrage over this incident at those fans is "part of the solution". also, i don't disagree with much of what you wrote, and i'd certainly prefer we live in a society where people really can be truly shocked and outraged when violence occurs (whether it occurs on a football field, a schoolyard, or anywhere else for that matter) but that is not the reality of where we're at in this culture. we are becoming numbed to violence and my broader point was that this act just wasn't surprising given how much we glorify the role of violence in sports (and also in film and television, childrens toys, etc.). also, i've been to my fare share of NFL games and i've seen both responses to injuries, the one you describe as well as the one i describe. my point was that these actions are not isolated incidents. sports is a microcosm of society and what we witnessed is not "shocking" in the sense that anyone who looks at society/culture through any type of critical lens can see these broader patterns emerging. perhaps i'm just thinking about this stuff more as my kids starts getting to the age where he is going to be exposed more often to the violent imagery that has become commonplace in our culture.
i think we agree much more than we disagree and i apologize if my point wasn't clear.

team6
10-08-2012, 03:37 PM
I completely am shocked by this, and totally disagree with what gonzdb8 has to say. I have many friends that play in the NFL and have been to many of there games. I played in college and have gone to countless college football games and never have I seen a fan cheer for a serious injury. Once in a while they can give a high five if they know for sure the injury is not serious but I personally have never seen fans cheer if the injury has implications that it is serious what so ever... and if a fan did cheer I am positive that fans around that fan would scold them. This is an outrageous act... totally disrespectful and uncalled for and i truly believe this is unable in this society... sure games have violence as do sports but there is a line and as of now i believe that line is clearly seen... but who knows maybe i'm way off

BobZag
10-08-2012, 04:10 PM
While I agree with the general sentiment I think there is probably more to consider here. The NFL has created a product that absolutely glorifies violence. In fact, thats the basis of many of the lawsuits now facing the league. Now, i'm a huge fan of football (go Texans!), but it is what it is, a game that rewards those who can most effectively brutalize their opponents during a frantic game of land grab. Fans are socialized to cheer and go nuts when a particularly vicious hit is put on an opposing player so is it really that surprising that a fans conditioning spills over to cheering when a player from their team who is under performing takes a hard hit and then leaves the game? Add to the mix the huge amounts of alcohol consumed before and after the games and this simply doesn't surprise me at all. Why have none of you ever spoken up when fans cheer over an opposing player going down? When Patty Mills got hurt against us in K2 a couple years ago there were more than a few Zag fans in the stands high-fiving (i was there, i saw it) but there wasn't any outrage on our boards over it (at least not that i can remember).
So again, i get the sentiment and agree with it in principle that we should not cheer when anyone gets injured, but we simply should not be surprised about it or feign shock given the nature of the game and what its evolved into.

Why I cannot stand the NFL anymore and haven't watched a minute of it since long, long ago.

I, too, was at that Patty Mills game and did not see high-fives but I do sit above a very mature section (parents, guests, girlfriends, etc.) so I may have simply missed it. But if anyone had seen high-fiving it would've been posted by someone on this board (people can't resist); if you go back through the years on this board, you can find the thread(s) on Patty Mills being injured. I don't recall anyone being thrilled about it.

adoptedzag
10-08-2012, 07:28 PM
Things are cyclical. The Roman empire had the gladiators and we have... football. Its one of those things. In the bloodlust of the moment, combined with alcohol and mob mentality, these things happen. I was in Ohio when the browns fans totally lost their collective minds and were raining (then) glass bottles of beer on the field. It was not safe for anyone involved.

My point is that this is what we breed, violence and more violence. As the game has evolved, the players have gotten bigger, stronger, faster and we've given them weapons (helmets made of plastic).