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View Full Version : Doubt This Will Go Over Well



BobZag
04-27-2012, 10:24 AM
http://www.cbssports.com/collegebasketball/blog/eye-on-college-basketball/18859937/david-stern-would-like-the-nba-to-go-to-a-twoanddone-nba-draft-philosophy

Two-and done?

CDC84
04-27-2012, 10:25 AM
Stern has always wanted two and done. One and done was just a player's union compromise to get the ball rolling.

zag944
04-27-2012, 10:33 AM
Fair or not (I vote not), sending these kids to school for a year seems to have really helped the NBAs image problem quite a bit. It's a pretty drastic perception shift if Stern is willing to wait on the best young players out there.

2 and done isnt my preference still, but it is much better for the NCAA than 1 and done.

75Zag
04-27-2012, 10:34 AM
This is total bunk and nonsense but I don't see it affecting GU very much. Things could be much more interesting at schools like Kentucky. Imagine Coach Cal telling his starting 5 NBA draft lottery picks from last year that they need to scoot down the bench to spots 6 - 10 on the KY roster so that his incoming crop of 5 NBA draft lottery picks from this year's recruiting class can start this year. Then when his 6-10 players go in next year's NBA lottery, he can repeat the process. Etc. Etc. Etc. Etc.

Zag 77
04-27-2012, 10:44 AM
Under the current "one and done," the "student-athlete" technically only has to pass classes in the first semester/quarter. He can sign up for classes in the 2nd semester and never show up.

Coach Crazy
04-27-2012, 10:58 AM
I personally don't care how much of an experience restriction they put on new entries, they are a franchise, they have the right to post any that are seen to be necessary.

I'm sure we all complain when a job asks for a certain amount of experience to be able to apply for or receive a job in another profession...oh wait.

CDC84
04-27-2012, 11:19 AM
On a semi-related note:

http://aol.sportingnews.com/ncaa-basketball/story/2012-04-23/mark-emmert-kentucky-one-and-done-anthony-davis-kevin-durant


Kentucky’s APR scores reinforce John Calipari’s position that four of UK’s previous five one-and-done players completed their spring coursework before moving on to prepare for the draft, and the three freshmen leaving this year all publicly pledged they’ll finish their current terms.

Consider the University of Texas, which has had four one-and-done players since the rule was introduced—and each completed his spring term coursework before departing. Included among those was the player who, before we all met Anthony Davis, might have been considered THE one-and-done: forward Kevin Durant.

In 2006-07, Durant became the first freshman to win the Oscar Robertson Trophy. He now is working on his third consecutive NBA scoring title. Not only did he complete his full academic year at Texas as a freshman, he since has returned to Austin in particular summers and continued taking classes. After center Tristan Thompson left the Longhorns basketball program last spring, he stuck around the university to complete his coursework—and then was encouraged by the Cleveland Cavaliers to take classes at UT during the fall term, when the NBA lockout was in force.

Kiddwell
04-27-2012, 11:33 AM
Exposure to college, to a new culture (as it were), to new friends from all over the place, to the responsibilities of independence, to academic discipline (etc.) for two whole years makes Kiddwell smile... :) ...'cause all the aforesaid is good stuff on the way to building adulthood.



This fan's $.05 worth...

:]

zagzealot
04-27-2012, 11:45 AM
I like it and i've been a fan of this for awhile. It irks me that these players who are supposed to be student-athletes take scholarship money and leave after one year for their profession. I'd be hardpressed to think of a kid who earned a college scholarship for academic reasons leave after one year of college because he's such an awesome engineer/lawyer/accountant and on and on.

If nothing else, make these players pay back the scholarship they were given if they leave after 1 year.

gbnyba17
04-27-2012, 11:56 AM
could this actually help schools like GU? as one poster eluded, why would a 5star recruit want to spend one of his two years sitting behind another 5 star recruit (which is likely to happen at schools like KU, UK, Duke, UNC, etc)? will this push some of these kids to smaller or slightly less prestigious basketball schools? just a thought. whether this actually plays out, doubtful...

on a side note, end this drama and wait already, PK!

Malastein
04-27-2012, 12:00 PM
I think a lot of people will want to bash the NBA for this, but I think it is overall positive for both college and professional basketball. The stepping stone of higher competition in the NCAA is great for players to hone their skills for the next level, while still having a more normal progression in life. There are so many jobs which require degrees, so having that 2 year requirement is akin to saying you've got to get an associate's before you are qualified. Many of the young guys who came straight to the league didn't have the maturity to make it, and probably weren't as good as they could have been without that stepping stone.

CaliforniaZaggin'
04-27-2012, 12:16 PM
I don't like this rule because it is essentially intended to save NBA general managers from themselves. GMs don't have to draft kids coming straight out of high school who aren't ready for the Association, yet they continually do so. It's like they've become addicted to the potential of young, unproven players, and the only way to wean them off of that obsession is to impose this type of limitation. It's like HS players are a drug, and this the NBA's chosen form of detox for addicted GMs.

zag944
04-27-2012, 01:00 PM
I don't like this rule because it is essentially intended to save NBA general managers from themselves. GMs don't have to draft kids coming straight out of high school who aren't ready for the Association, yet they continually do so. It's like they've become addicted to the potential of young, unproven players, and the only way to wean them off of that obsession is to impose this type of limitation. It's like HS players are a drug, and this the NBA's chosen form of detox for addicted GMs.

their track record isnt all that consistent with college players either.

Once and Future Zag
04-27-2012, 01:06 PM
I like MLB's (http://mlb.mlb.com/mlb/draftday/rules.jsp) rules for the draft:


Certain groups of players are ineligible for selection, generally because they are still in school. The basic categories of players eligible to be drafted are:

High school players, if they have graduated from high school and have not yet attended college or junior college;

College players, from four-year colleges who have either completed their junior or senior years or are at least 21 years old; and

Junior college players, regardless of how many years of school they have completed

CDC84
04-27-2012, 01:15 PM
If you really think about it, the entire job description of a sports commissioner is to, when necessary, help save general managers and sports owners from themselves because the damage they do doesn't just harm their own team, but other teams within the league as well, and when that happens, it hurts league's ability to sell itself as a collective product to consumers. That's what he does. Someone has to be looking after the better interests of the league as a whole to ensure competitive balance and such.

Otherwise, there's no point in having a sports commissioner.

For me the question has never been about whether it is right or not for Stern to encourage the age limit. That's his job...to suggest things that he feels will make the league better as a collective product.

I think the real question is whether the age limit betters the league as a collective product. As we have seen time and again on this board, it's a subject that leads to healthy debate.

But this whole notion that some folks have that Stern is a tyrant for doing what he does, well, what the heck else is he supposed to do? Sit in his office and twiddle his thumbs? Provide no vision or guidance? Besides, he doesn't have as much power and authority as a lot of people think. Nothing he wants is going to go into place without other people agreeing with it.

bullzag23
04-27-2012, 01:26 PM
I think the real question is whether the age limit betters the league as a collective product. As we have seen time and again on this board, it's a subject that leads to healthy debate.


In this case I think the answer is a resounding 'yes'. The NBA benefits greatly from players attending college for at least a year or two simply by the increased marketability those players have after showcasing their abilities on the national stage(albeit at a lower level of competition than NBA). When players jump straight from high school there is an overall lack of fan familiarity and this tends to turn away casual fans who want to see recognizable players.

KStyles
04-27-2012, 03:42 PM
In this case I think the answer is a resounding 'yes'. The NBA benefits greatly from players attending college for at least a year or two simply by the increased marketability those players have after showcasing their abilities on the national stage(albeit at a lower level of competition than NBA). When players jump straight from high school there is an overall lack of fan familiarity and this tends to turn away casual fans who want to see recognizable players.

Huge part of it. Most of these guys (Brajdon Jennings, etc., excluded) play for a year with quite a few games on national TV, they are mentioned on Sportscenter every night they have a game, and fans of their school/conference become fans/followers of the players. Way more exposure & fan following for a Kevin Durant after playing for Texas than if he'd jumped from Oak Hill/Montrose Christian straight to the pros. He probably had most of the skills either way, but for him to come into the League with that extra year of exposure definitely helps his marketability right off the bat. The added marketability greatly increases the NBA's product sales.

Angelo Roncalli
04-27-2012, 03:56 PM
If you really think about it, the entire job description of a sports commissioner is to, when necessary, help save general managers and sports owners from themselves because the damage they do doesn't just harm their own team, but other teams within the league as well, and when that happens, it hurts league's ability to sell itself as a collective product to consumers. That's what he does. Someone has to be looking after the better interests of the league as a whole to ensure competitive balance and such.

Otherwise, there's no point in having a sports commissioner.

For me the question has never been about whether it is right or not for Stern to encourage the age limit. That's his job...to suggest things that he feels will make the league better as a collective product.

I think the real question is whether the age limit betters the league as a collective product. As we have seen time and again on this board, it's a subject that leads to healthy debate.

But this whole notion that some folks have that Stern is a tyrant for doing what he does, well, what the heck else is he supposed to do? Sit in his office and twiddle his thumbs? Provide no vision or guidance? Besides, he doesn't have as much power and authority as a lot of people think. Nothing he wants is going to go into place without other people agreeing with it.

I don't know if he's a tyrant, but he's a duplicitous son of a #####.

CDC84
04-27-2012, 04:50 PM
I don't know if he's a tyrant, but he's a duplicitous son of a #####.

Spoken like a true Sonics fan :)

Zag Mom
04-28-2012, 10:31 AM
The stats for NBA players bankrupt is large. How many one and dones are still in the league? How many are bankrupt? And when their careers are over and all professional sports careers do end what are they able to do when their money runs out.

CaliforniaZaggin'
04-28-2012, 11:26 AM
Good point, ZM. I doubt many one-and-done NBA rookies are setting aside money from their game checks to pay for for college tuition just in case their careers aren't as long and prosperous as they had hoped.

UberZagFan
04-29-2012, 12:35 PM
I'd be hardpressed to think of a kid who earned a college scholarship for academic reasons leave after one year of college because he's such an awesome engineer/lawyer/accountant and on and on.


Not on scholarship but Zuckerberg and Gates come to mind. Uber is pretty sure there are thousands of students who were on academic sholarships and left their schools for one reason or another--we just usually don't hear about them unless they founded Microsoft or Facebook.


The stats for NBA players bankrupt is large. How many one and dones are still in the league? How many are bankrupt? And when their careers are over and all professional sports careers do end what are they able to do when their money runs out.

Bankrupt? Really? Uber is only aware of 2 one and dones that are currently not on NBA rosters -- Javaris Crittenton, the guy who got in the gun thing with Arenas and is now facing murder charges and Tiny Gallon (who broke a backboard against GU his freshman year at OU). The other 37 one and dones are playing in the NBA and are likely far from bankrupt.

JPtheBeasta
04-29-2012, 01:46 PM
Spoken like a true Sonics fan :)

As a Phoenix transplant/Suns fan (and Sonics fan) I have to agree with Angelo. MANY people can't stand him here because of the suspensions handed down from the fight-that-wasn't against the Spurs several years ago. I actually have a hard time even listening to him in interviews. Some day, I hope to get over it, but I'm not there yet.

As for the rule change, I'm in the camp with those that think the NBA can do whatever it wants. If I was good enough at something to make the money I do without going to college, I probably wouldn't have gone. On the other hand, these guys are celebrities in college and the experience they have while there has to be pretty amazing. I selfishly like to see these guys play in college because I'm just not that into the NBA, but I don't have any moral or ethical high ground that I feel is firm enough to stand on.

JAGzag
04-29-2012, 02:09 PM
The stats for NBA players bankrupt is large. How many one and dones are still in the league? How many are bankrupt? And when their careers are over and all professional sports careers do end what are they able to do when their money runs out.

Good thought but I highly doubt many of these kids are academically inclined and really, how is another year of woodcarving classes going to help them in the long run? No, for most these kids going to college to play ball is just another business investment.

awberke
04-29-2012, 02:49 PM
The stats for NBA players bankrupt is large. How many one and dones are still in the league? How many are bankrupt? And when their careers are over and all professional sports careers do end what are they able to do when their money runs out.

If you have the stat, post it. Don't propagate misinformation. "High" is a really vague word.

I'm not saying its not "high" but at least back your claims.

KStyles
04-29-2012, 07:43 PM
The stats for NBA players bankrupt is large. How many one and dones are still in the league? How many are bankrupt? And when their careers are over and all professional sports careers do end what are they able to do when their money runs out.

Since 2006, there have been 49 'One & Dones.' 40 were drafted, 37 are still in the league.

Not a much higher percentage than the 33 out of 47 preps-to-pros who made a decent career playing in the NBA.

http://www.nba.com/2012/news/features/david_aldridge/04/09/morning-tip-nba-draft-age-limit-debate/index.html

KStyles
04-29-2012, 07:52 PM
If you have the stat, post it. Don't propagate misinformation. "High" is a really vague word.

I'm not saying its not "high" but at least back your claims.


Percentage of NBA players who go bankrupt within 5 years of their careers ending was estimated at 60%, as of a few years ago, although the SI article doesn't distinguish further between high-schoolers, one & dones & college grads.

"Within five years of retirement, an estimated 60% of former NBA players are broke."

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vault/article/magazine/MAG1153364/2/index.htm