PDA

View Full Version : Recruiting Student/Athletes



rijman
04-27-2011, 08:30 AM
I wonder how much GU's academic standards limit the available basketball players they can recruit. There has been discussion in this forum about different top players, who don't end up with the Zags, but I don't recall any recent discussion of players who aren't the right fit for academic reasons.

The reason I mention this is because in recent years there was talk of Notre Dame being hampered in football because of their academic requirements, which applied to their athletes. They weren't able to recruit all the top athletes that other schools were getting. For some reason I never hear about Stanford having trouble bringing in top athletes and they have competed well in major sports in recent years. I suspect Stanford is lenient in the academic qualifications of their athletes, but this is just pure speculation.

Does Gonzaga still have a high academic standard for their athletes? I recall my father, GU '58, talking proudly about how GU recruited basketball players that were good students and athletes. With GU becoming ever more competitive on the basketball court do they widen the range of students they will admit to get top athletes? I suspect there are top basketball players that GU won't recruit because their commitment to academics in high school was lacking, but I never hear about it. If Gonzaga is unable to recruit some of the top basketball players because of academics and those athletes end up somewhere else (I'm not going to mention Kentucky even though Bobby Knight did) playing against schools such as Gonzaga then they have an advantage on the court.

This perspective helps me to attain a higher appreciation of the Zags recent accomplishments because I suspect that they don't even try to recruit many top athletes for academic reasons despite what they are capable of contributing to GU's athletics for one or 2 seasons before moving on.

CDC84
04-27-2011, 08:55 AM
For some reason I never hear about Stanford having trouble bringing in top athletes and they have competed well in major sports in recent years. I suspect Stanford is lenient in the academic qualifications of their athletes, but this is just pure speculation.

Stanford, like almost every division one basketball program, will lower its admission standards at times for athletes. But trust me, no dummies are getting in. They won’t pursue athletes who they feel can’t academically compete at their university. I think you have to separate admissions from the ability to academically compete once an athlete has been accepted. Did Jeremy Pargo’s high school transcript equal the transcript of the average Gonzaga student? Probably not. Could he academically compete? Yes. He graduated from Gonzaga with a degree. At no point during his time at Gonzaga did you hear of him having academic problems. That’s the main concern for me.

webspinnre
04-27-2011, 09:15 AM
The other thing to point out is that while Gonzaga is a very good school, its admissions process isn't super-demanding. According to the College Board site, 62% of students who apply are admitted. For Stanford, that number is 7%. So, as CDC mentions, as long as a student can compete academically, its not like an athlete would be taking the spot of some other deserving student.

JPtheBeasta
04-27-2011, 09:36 AM
My recollection was that GU cooled on Casto (WSU) because he couldn't read.

That is hyperbole, and a joke for people that remember the incident in question, but I believe I read here that the staff was worried he wouldn't pass academic muster at GU.That said, I get the impression (from someone about as outside-looking-in as you can get) that character and the well-documented team chemistry test/veto is a bigger deal. As someone who barely got into grad school because of bad GPA and competed well with his transcript-blessed classmates once in my program, I appreciate what they did for Pargo (and I'm sure others). In a way, when you feel like someone takes a chance on you, then you work hard to prove you should be there- a dynamic that could be at work with Bryce Jones as well, should he transfer here.

hooter73
04-27-2011, 09:51 AM
it may be conjectured and Ive said it myself but we do have tougher than most academics here. Whether that really really in the long run hurts us in recruiting I dont think so. Big East schools and warm climate schools are established in their programs and legacy's. We are the quality mid to high major school in our region and if someone was looking at Duke, Carolina, Kentuky, Kansas... they wouldnt be seriously looking at us anyway - Witjer included.

rijman
04-27-2011, 12:45 PM
We are the quality mid to high major school in our region and if someone was looking at Duke, Carolina, Kentuky, Kansas... they wouldnt be seriously looking at us anyway - Wiltjer included.
I think recruiting is a 2 way street and if Gonzaga doesn't recruit the top athletes who are lacking in academic discipline then they won't ever have a chance to get them, which is fine, I have no problem with that. Look at Notre Dame who wasn't getting enough top athletes for football because the football players had to meet stringent academic requirements above and beyond those found at most D1 schools. It was widely reported that the majority of top 100 recruits weren't available to ND because of academics.

I'm curious how much Gonzaga's academic standards affect their recruiting. I'm sure Duke's academic standards limit their ability to get some top basketball players as well.

With all the NCAA rules and regulations I find it interesting that each schools own self imposed academic standards affect their recruiting and this can create an uneven playing field.

CDC84
04-27-2011, 12:58 PM
It's more difficult for football due to the enormous amount of players you have to get to fill a roster.

Bogozags
04-27-2011, 03:39 PM
With regards to Pargo's recruitment, I read on this board sometime ago that it was questionable on whether he would be able to get in that he had to get so many references to stand up for him and also the academic improvements he made from his junior to senior year. He worked extremely hard to get to the point GU offered him a scholarship and he proved everyone right in the classroom and on the court!

Baseline
04-27-2011, 09:36 PM
I think this years freshmen all are pretty solid academically. I know a couple were listed as having very good great points. This years Freshmen may be one of the smarter classes, but I haven't followed the grades too long so I'm sorta guessing based on a few comments.

CB4
04-28-2011, 12:47 AM
An variable that often gets overlooked is the fact that admitting a student with a poor high school GPA and ACT/SAT may not reflect on what that student can contribute to the university. Jeremy Pargo, despite his poor grades in high school, probably contributed a lot more to the Gonzaga community than the average GU student.

The admissions office admits students with on unique skills that they believe will be beneficial to the university. Grades are a major part of getting into college, but all schools admit unique students, athletes or otherwise, that they believe can contribute to the university.

gu03alum
04-28-2011, 03:24 AM
An variable that often gets overlooked is the fact that admitting a student with a poor high school GPA and ACT/SAT may not reflect on what that student can contribute to the university. Jeremy Pargo, despite his poor grades in high school, probably contributed a lot more to the Gonzaga community than the average GU student.

The admissions office admits students with on unique skills that they believe will be beneficial to the university. Grades are a major part of getting into college, but all schools admit unique students, athletes or otherwise, that they believe can contribute to the university.

As CB4 points out, the admissions process is holistic. They look at the whole student. There are no hard and fast GPA and test standards. Those things figure in, but so does activities, ability to communicate in an essay, and other factors.