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CDC84
04-14-2011, 09:20 AM
A couple of articles:

http://aol.sportingnews.com/ncaa-basketball/story/2011-04-13/ncaa-would-be-wrong-to-move-up-early-entry-date


The NCAA’s Legislative Council on Wednesday approved the heinous Proposal 2010-24, which would move the withdrawal deadline for college underclassmen wishing to retain NCAA eligibility to the day before the spring letter-of-intent signing period.

The only hope now is for the NCAA Board of Directors to squash this proposal, as it has done periodically -- but not universally -- when the council has been this irresponsible in the past.

If the new deadline were in place this year, Missouri's Kim English, Michigan's Darius Morris and Pitt's Ashton Gibbs would have been forced to make up their minds by April 12.

The NBA does not even require players to enter the draft until April 24, and the final draft order won’t be set for nearly a month.

“Testing the waters” used to be a legitimate exercise for college players with professional aspirations. Now, if they get a splash of that water on their sneakers they’ll be gone from college for good.

The coaches from the Atlantic Coast Conference pushed for the change of the NBA’s withdrawal deadline for early entrants, which had allowed players to consider their options until 10 days before the draft, to the early May deadline that was in place in 2010 and will be again this year. The ACC again backed this new proposal, supposedly so the colleges could have some degree of certainty regarding future rosters.

The honest truth?

Certain coaches want the deadline again pushed forward so they can play golf or go fishing in May without having to call NBA general managers and coaches on behalf of players trying to determine the best course for their futures.

http://aol.sportingnews.com/ncaa-basketball/story/2011-04-13/underclassmen-have-no-clear-choice-in-nbas-muddy-waters


Calipari long has been criticized for his stance on college players and the draft. He never has had a player projected as a high lottery pick return to school because Calipari’s advice -- no, his insistence -- always has been that any player whose draft position can’t be greatly improved should take advantage.

In the cases of Brandon Knight and Terrence Jones, it’s not as clear. And it’s harder to locate clarity in part because of the ridiculous rule that forces players to make their ultimate decisions by May 8 -- before the NBA conducts its draft lottery to establish the order of selections.

If a team that currently figures into the 10th position were to tell Calipari it liked one of his players enough to take him at that spot and the player stayed in the draft -- what would happen if that team turned out to be a lottery winner and moved into the No. 2 pick? The “promise” would vanish. The player still might be chosen by another team in that range, or he could plummet to later in the round.

“There are two hopes: Either we’re in the green room and we’re laughing and they get picked, or they come back with an absolute passion to improve and help us win every game,” Calipari said.


Calipari has been thinking for months about the looming NBA lockout’s impact on this process.

Players such as UCLA’s Malcolm Lee charged eagerly onto the early-entry list with no apparent concern for this issue, although coach Ben Howland warned it could damage his development.

“I feel bad because I think it’s a really tough time for these kids to be coming out,” Howland said. “From the standpoint of the lockout looming -- how that affects the draft, how that affects your ability to position yourself for a team you’re drafted by.”


The NBA reportedly has canceled its Las Vegas summer league, which would mean second-round picks -- Lee is projected to go in Round 2, according to Howland -- wouldn't get the chance to establish their potential in the way Luke Harangody did for the Celtics last July.

If training camps are wiped out, it would be another lost opportunity for young players to prove their worth.

If games are lost, players wouldn't get paid.

Through all of this, those who do turn professional must keep themselves in condition to play whenever a lockout does end. And that kind of training does not come for free.

Ultimately, if there’s a long lockout, players who enter the draft without the kind of endorsement opportunities of Kemba Walker likely will find themselves deep in debt. Will agents help? Sure. They’ll set up access to training, help arrange loans to fund it. But pay for it themselves? Please.

lothar98zag
04-14-2011, 09:53 AM
Stupid, just stupid.

The coaches behind this need to grab their

http://www.diaperconnection.com/images/binky.jpg,

stop crying, and shut up. Want more time off? Go coach NAIA or something.

spudzag
04-14-2011, 10:03 AM
The best change they could make is to just let kids go pro out of high school. Let's get beyond this one and done BS. If a kid wants to go pro let him. Let college ball and pro ball be the two different things they should be.

CDC84
04-14-2011, 10:18 AM
This issue really isn't about one and done kids like John Wall who are going to go top 5 whether they play college ball or not. That's really a separate issue. This issue is about college players who weren't good enough to be pros directly out of high school, but who are possibly good enough to go pro while they still have college eligibility left. There are far, far more of these kinds of kids than there are one and done types like John Wall. Frankly, this deadline sucks for them. No kid (and his family) should have to make a life altering decision like this just 8 days after the national title game and right in the middle of an academic semester. There needs to be time for the NBA lottery draft order to be determined, and for the kids to get a proper evaluation so that they can make an informed decision.

As a side note - before the NBA age limit was put in place, it wasn't as though every McDonald's AA went directly to the draft. In 2005, only 8 high schoolers went into the draft directly out of high school. Same in 2004. So if you lifted the age limit, it's not as though the controversy surrounding this NBA draft decision deadline would vanish.

GUDan07
04-14-2011, 07:22 PM
The best idea that I have heard is to allow the kids to make the choice to enter the NBA straight out of high school or play college, but if they chose college, require them to stay until after the completion of their junior year. This scenario seems to make the most sense and takes into account the inrests of the kids, the NBA and their prospective schools.

skan72
04-14-2011, 07:44 PM
The best idea that I have heard is to allow the kids to make the choice to enter the NBA straight out of high school or play college, but if they chose college, require them to stay until after the completion of their junior year. This scenario seems to make the most sense and takes into account the inrests of the kids, the NBA and their prospective schools.

I like the sounds of that! I'd rather it be until after their sophomore year, but it sounds like a great idea. Where has this been proposed? Anywhere that actually will make a difference?

webspinnre
04-15-2011, 06:00 AM
The best idea that I have heard is to allow the kids to make the choice to enter the NBA straight out of high school or play college, but if they chose college, require them to stay until after the completion of their junior year. This scenario seems to make the most sense and takes into account the inrests of the kids, the NBA and their prospective schools.

Which is basically what football and baseball require (complete three years of school, which could include the redshirt year).

cjm720
04-15-2011, 06:25 AM
Good rule. Focus on school, not the NBA. Will force only the players that are locks to enter their name, which is good for both the NBA and NCAA.

CDC84
04-15-2011, 08:55 AM
The best idea that I have heard is to allow the kids to make the choice to enter the NBA straight out of high school or play college, but if they chose college, require them to stay until after the completion of their junior year. This scenario seems to make the most sense and takes into account the inrests of the kids, the NBA and their prospective schools.

Unfortunately, this still doesn't totally cure the problems with the new draft decision deadline. If you say that kids have to stay until their junior year if they elect to go to college, they still have one more year of eligibility left. A lot of players after their junior season (see Jeremy Pargo) need to test the waters before making a decision to come back or not. The new draft decision deadline date is still going to be an issue for juniors unless they extend it and allow juniors (and nobody else) to test the waters after the semester is over.

GUDan07
04-15-2011, 01:10 PM
Unfortunately, this still doesn't totally cure the problems with the new draft decision deadline. If you say that kids have to stay until their junior year if they elect to go to college, they still have one more year of eligibility left. A lot of players after their junior season (see Jeremy Pargo) need to test the waters before making a decision to come back or not. The new draft decision deadline date is still going to be an issue for juniors unless they extend it and allow juniors (and nobody else) to test the waters after the semester is over.

No, but it does alleviate much of the problem is a round about manor. If you're dealing only with kids entering their senior years, the decision is much more clear in most cases. And for the most part, if you're not sure about whether you're ready or not, you're not ready.

RenoZag
04-28-2011, 06:33 PM
http://sports.espn.go.com/ncaa/news/story?id=6444510


"For players, I just don't see how that helps them a whole lot," Butler forward Matt Howard said Thursday during a shootaround at Hinkle Fieldhouse. "It almost makes it pointless to put your name out and not sign with an agent."

The legislation wasn't intended to help players.

Coaches wanted the earlier date so they could find replacements for those making an early jump to the NBA.

CDC84
04-28-2011, 08:20 PM
Coaches wanted the earlier date so they could find replacements for those making an early jump to the NBA.

That is, coaches wanted the earlier date so they could hit the golf course earlier.

CDC84
04-29-2011, 07:22 AM
I particularly like how Matt Howard - who defines the term "student-athlete" more than any athlete in any sport in college athletics - has been extremely vocal regarding the ridiculousness of the new draft decision deadline. I hope he heads the NCAA one of these days. He might very well do so.

willandi
04-29-2011, 07:33 AM
to see what would happen if the Student Athletes took matters into their own hands, reminded the NCAA that they (the NCAA) is there for the athletes, not the other way around. They could present their own plan, including a later date to withdraw from the draft (ability to truly test the waters), going to College on a scholarship is a 2-3 year commitment at least, and maybe even get a little spending money out of it.
Couldn't happen? What if today, EVERY COLLEGE BASKETBALL PLAYER DECLARED FOR THE DRAFT!!! and DIDN"T WITHDRAW THEIR NAME? If the NCAA insisted that they were ALL ineligible, the very best for the NCAA would be an extremely watered down product, only incoming recruits would be on the team, and that's assuming that the Coaches didn't support their teams, afterall, how many of them would want to have to explain to Alumni and fans?
With twitter this could all be done in a manner of days. The NCAA could be made irrelelevent, and college sports could become for the student athlete again.

Oregonzagnut
04-29-2011, 09:07 AM
And it has little to do with the NBA.

The NCAA should promote profit sharing for the student athletes who compete and sacrifice. If a Div1 school has 15 kids the ones who graduate should get .5-1% of the profits from their efforts AFTER they graduate. When Daye left earyly he made everyone else work that much harder so he could get rich quicker. When kids like Michaelson or Sorrenson graduate, they should get 4-5 years of royalties from their efforts that get others filthy rich. If you leave school early you get zilch. I believe this would provide incentive to stay in school longer by "investing" in their own time especially if they aren't going pro. Plus it would create another reason for kids to promote the school, make the team successful, on and off the court. More would get their degree AND if they don't draft or they lose draft position for staying longer in school, they at least have compensation (and a degree) for that sacrifice and risk. It is just fair IMO.

Many kids choose to stay and it sometimes hurts their draft position. So then Gonzaga reaps most of the benefits. Why shouldn't Harris look forward to profit sharing after he graduates if he can't get drafted? There is too high a reward for too few kids who are good enough to go pro, but walk-ons put in the same effort (maybe more) as some kids who have the genetic size and skill and are locks for pro ball. It takes a team. And when 1 or 2 guys get rich off the team (Morrison, Daye) and the school and NCAA makes bank, 10-11 guys are left out of the equation and they helped get Morrison and Daye rich. The NCAA is a much bigger business now than it was 20 years ago. The NBA, NCAA and coaches are getting greedier by the day. So lets reward the guys in the trenches who make it all possible. Even if it is just 2-3K a year, or less.

College basketball is a business and IMO, players are treated as pseudo slaves. NCAA officials, TV stations, athletic departments and head coaches get stinking rich off these kids and I do not believe a scholarship is as equitable in the equation as it used to be.

Guys like Sorrenson, Michaelson and Foster, deserve a piece of the pie they helped make.