PDA

View Full Version : OT: Great Article on Ray Allen



229SintoZag
02-11-2011, 10:37 AM
Ray Allen is about to break Reggie Miller's 3 point record. I came across this article today about him and thought several points in the article are worthy of note. Perhaps the most noteworthy is the degree to which Allen worked and worked on his shot to get to this point, and that he was not "born" a great shooter but became one by working on it.

"I've argued this with a lot of people in my life,'' Allen said. "When people say God blessed me with a beautiful jump shot, it really pisses me off. I tell those people, 'Don't undermine the work I've put in every day.' Not some days. Every day. Ask anyone who has been on a team with me who shoots the most. Go back to Seattle and Milwaukee, and ask them. The answer is me -- not because it's a competition but because that's how I prepare.

"[My preparation] drives me insane. I'm wrought with anxiety about being ready, about getting my shots in with nobody on the floor but me. Sometimes I get this bad feeling, almost like an itch, and I've got to get rid of it. I've got to get out there and get my shots up so that feeling goes away. It is bothering me right now. Small things are getting to me.

"Some people could care less if they make a jump shot, a free throw," Allen continued. "I have chosen to zone in and focus on this. I played baseball and football and some soccer, and I truly would have been the best at those sports at whatever position I chose because I would have set my mind to it.

"I'm of sound mind and body, two arms and two legs, like millions of other people, but the ones who want it badly enough set themselves apart.''

If I were Few I would have the entire team read this article. There is something to be said for a gym rat. The harder you work, the luckier you are.

http://sports.espn.go.com/boston/nba/columns/story?columnist=macmullan_jackie&id=6106450

gamagin
02-11-2011, 11:15 AM
Ray Allen is about to break Reggie Miller's 3 point record. I came across this article today about him and thought several points in the article are worthy of note. Perhaps the most noteworthy is the degree to which Allen worked and worked on his shot to get to this point, and that he was not "born" a great shooter but became one by working on it.

"I've argued this with a lot of people in my life,'' Allen said. "When people say God blessed me with a beautiful jump shot, it really pisses me off. I tell those people, 'Don't undermine the work I've put in every day.' Not some days. Every day. Ask anyone who has been on a team with me who shoots the most. Go back to Seattle and Milwaukee, and ask them. The answer is me -- not because it's a competition but because that's how I prepare.

"[My preparation] drives me insane. I'm wrought with anxiety about being ready, about getting my shots in with nobody on the floor but me. Sometimes I get this bad feeling, almost like an itch, and I've got to get rid of it. I've got to get out there and get my shots up so that feeling goes away. It is bothering me right now. Small things are getting to me.

"Some people could care less if they make a jump shot, a free throw," Allen continued. "I have chosen to zone in and focus on this. I played baseball and football and some soccer, and I truly would have been the best at those sports at whatever position I chose because I would have set my mind to it.

"I'm of sound mind and body, two arms and two legs, like millions of other people, but the ones who want it badly enough set themselves apart.''

If I were Few I would have the entire team read this article. There is something to be said for a gym rat. The harder you work, the luckier you are.

http://sports.espn.go.com/boston/nba/columns/story?columnist=macmullan_jackie&id=6106450

that's the not-so-well kept secrets all the greats know. They are freaks. From Stock to Jordan to Magic, Bird -- you name it. Doesn't matter what sport, either.

They all spend more time visualizing their game than practicing, then spend a thousand times more time practicing their game than any others. God given talent is where they start. Appreciating it and then working harder & longer than anyone else, however, is what makes it all happen.

I once saw the great WSU runner Henry Rono start a race and lead the pack for several hundred yards only to have the race called back by the starters for some odd reason. He was, everyone noted, on pace for a record (don't recall how big a record) when the gun fired a couple shots calling everyone back.

Henry stayed cool. He showed no emotion. He returned back to the starting line, waited for everyone else like it was a walk in the park, then took off in the second, clean start. Sports buffs later checked Henry's time against his time the first go round and learned he ran that leg in the second race faster than the first. THAT is what champions do.

I predict you will see this kind of thing continue to unfold with DS's game, too, because he is cut from the same cloth and will make it his advantage, too, to outwork all his opponents -- then see how far it takes him. It will be fun to watch. Just like his dad was, no matter how far DS manages to take it.