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PeninsulaDog
07-16-2010, 01:35 PM
Moderators please feel free to move this thread, but I thought this was newsworthy:



July 16, 2010



Dear Gonzaga friends,

On Friday, July 16, the Gonzaga University Board of Trustees unanimously elected Dr. Thayne McCulloh as the University’s 26th president. Dr. McCulloh has served in an exemplary manner as interim president over the past year, and we are convinced that he is the right person for the position at this time in the University’s history. Dr. McCulloh lived the Gonzaga experience as an undergraduate, and we watched him mature as a leader during his 20-year tenure at Gonzaga. He has succeeded at nearly every project he has undertaken, ranging from revamping our financial aid program to creating strategic growth management plans.

Gonzaga is blessed with great prosperity – largely due to the generosity of our constituents – that afforded us the opportunity to select the very best leader possible. In the past year, more prospective students applied to Gonzaga than ever before, more individuals gave gifts to the University than in any other year and more students experienced an education infused with the Jesuit ideals of faith and service than ever before. It quickly became clear Dr. McCulloh was not only maintaining this momentum, but creating it.

Dr. McCulloh is the first lay president to serve Gonzaga as a regular appointee – a fact the Trustees did not take lightly. While we initially set out to find a Jesuit to replace Father Robert J. Spitzer, S.J., over time it became clear that the best leader, visionary and person to keep Gonzaga moving forward was right here. In order to seize this specific opportunity, the University bylaws requiring the president to be a Jesuit were suspended. While this does not preclude Gonzaga from having a Jesuit leader in the future, we know that Dr. McCulloh is the right person to lead Gonzaga into its 125th Anniversary (2012) and beyond.

The Gonzaga Jesuit community, led by Father Steve Kuder, S.J., is confident in Dr. McCulloh’s ability to further Gonzaga’s Catholic, Jesuit mission. As part of our process, Trustee Emeritus Tom Tilford and Trustee Kathleen Magnuson Sheppard met with faculty, staff, Jesuit, administrative, Regent and Trustee leadership to discuss this decision. All strongly supported Dr. McCulloh’s leadership, citing his aptitude for handling financial matters, inclusiveness in decision making and focus on academic excellence.

Finally, Dr. McCulloh has a vision for Gonzaga. He is focusing additional resources on addressing student needs, and shifting dollars to key student life and academic priorities. He is setting in motion plans to expand the University endowment to make Gonzaga more accessible to students. This effort will result in more scholarships, professorships for faculty and funds for student life enterprises. He also sees merit in an interdisciplinary approach to prepare students to address some of the world’s biggest challenges.

The appointment of Dr. McCulloh to president gives us great optimism for the future of Gonzaga University. The mission of Gonzaga is strong and well articulated, and the faculty here is second-to-none. Dr. McCulloh is blessed to have a presidential cabinet that has a collective service to the University of more than 150 years. Gonzaga is in good hands. Please join me in welcoming Dr. Thayne McCulloh as Gonzaga’s next great president.

Please visit www.gonzaga.edu/president for more information.

Sincerely,

John J. Luger
Chair, Gonzaga University Board of Trustees

former1dog
07-16-2010, 01:40 PM
Congrats to Thayne. I knew him as the RD of CM when I was a student, which is kind of weird. :)

ZagKing09
07-16-2010, 02:06 PM
Agreed! Congratulations to Thayne! I think that he has been and will continue to be a great guide and leader for GU.

Martin Centre Mad Man
07-16-2010, 03:02 PM
Agreed! Congratulations to Thayne! I think that he has been and will continue to be a great guide and leader for GU.

He was a good man to work for. I was an RA when he was the head of student life.

75Zag
07-16-2010, 04:53 PM
I am very disappointed that GU will no longer be lead by a Jesuit. I understand the economic realities that GU is facing, but I am not ok with the movement away from the Society of Jesus.

But whatever.

Go Bulldogs! Get Bigger!

TheBeast
07-17-2010, 06:52 AM
I am very disappointed that GU will no longer be lead by a Jesuit. I understand the economic realities that GU is facing, but I am not ok with the movement away from the Society of Jesus.

!

I'm going to be mulling this over for a while, but this is my gut reaction as well...

NJZag
07-17-2010, 12:41 PM
I'm going to be mulling this over for a while, but this is my gut reaction as well...

Ditto. And in Gonzaga's case, the frustrating sense that we HAD A JESUIT who seemed to be running the place pretty well (with "bumps" as all the growth happened) and who the Trustees would have liked to KEEP and who seemed all "set" to STAY. This is not a knock on the new guy, who might be the best thing since sliced bread, but more a feeling that all is not well as Jesuit and other Catholic colleges plunge into LayLand presidencies. Interesting post about the lay President at Georgetown ...

http://hoyatalk2.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=bluegray&action=display&thread=22403 and a local newspaper article it linked ...



Boom times for local college presidents
By: Emily Babay
Examiner Staff Writer
July 6, 2010
(Andrew Harnik/Examiner file)

Most workers haven't seen big pay increases lately -- much less raises of up to 42 percent. But college presidents in the Washington area have.

Amid the tough economy and rising tuition rates, university leaders are raking in ever larger salaries and benefits packages. Most Washington-area university presidents received sizable increases in total compensationlast year, according to their most recent tax forms.

Georgetown University's president, John DeGioia, for instance, received $911,613 in total compensation for fiscal 2009, according to tax forms filed by the school. That's a 42 percent increase from his pay of $642,582 reported on the 2008 tax form.

Other double-digit rises include 37 percent for Catholic University's David O'Connell and a 14.3 percent for Trinity University's Patricia McGuire.

Those jumps in pay are reason for concern, some education experts say.

High salaries can be frustrating to parents struggling to pay tuition, said Jim Boyle, president of Arlington advocacy group College Parents of America. "They're watching more closely where their dollars are going."

Highly paid presidents, Boyle added, can drive up personnel costs by putting pressure on universities to raise salaries for other administrators and faculty.

Rises in total compensation -- which includes salary, benefits and deferred pay -- are often the result of benefits that accrue as presidents remain on the job.

DeGioia's increase, for example, primarily comes from $150,000 allocated to a retirement annuity.

Such deferred pay agreements are common for college presidents, said Jim Moss, managing director of PRM Consulting and an expert on compensation at nonprofits. At George Mason University, an increase in President Alan Merten's deferred benefits pushed his compensation up 10.5 percent, to $624,125. Merten didn't take an increase in base salary in 2009 because "no state employee has had a salary increase in three years," said J. Thomas Hennessey, Merten's chief of staff.

And benefits sometimes cause big outcries. Last year, American University President Cornelius Kerwin made $760,774. That was a 46 percent drop -- but only because he received a lump-sum payout of $800,000 in 2008, in addition to his salary. That year, his total compensation was $1.4 million. The amount caused a fuss, recalled mathematics professor Virginia Stalling, a past president of the faculty senate.

Jordan Coughenour, who will be a junior at American in the fall, said Kerwin's salary is "definitely higher than I expected" and it "seems off" amid campus concerns about rising tuition.

Of course, salaries are relative. Rick Pitino, coach of the University of Louisville Cardinals men's basketball team in Kentucky, earns an annual salary of $2.5 million a year. And Bob Stoops, Oklahoma University's football coach, earned $4.3 million in total compensation in 2009, the highest in college football, according to USA Today.

Bob Corrigan, a Charleston, S.C., parent of a Georgetown student, said college presidents earn their salaries.

"We live in a state where the football coach gets three million a year and can't deliver a winner," he wrote in an e-mail.

Universities attributed presidential compensation increases to housing-value calculations and contract negotiations. Catholic University President David O'Connell's reported compensation jumped 37 percent. That's because the university updated the market value of his on-campus housing, though no upgrades to the house were made, according to spokesman Victor Nakas.

O'Connell's base salary is paid to his religious order, the Congregation of the Mission, not to O'Connell himself.

Trinity President Patricia McGuire's pay rose 14.3 percent, a result of her first base salary increase in three years, spokeswoman Ann Pauley said.

An exception is University of Virginia President John Casteen, whose total pay dropped 2.9 percent in 2009. University governing boards, not the presidents, are responsible for high pay and raises, Boyle said.

"If they are offered large amounts of money to serve in their role, they have every right to accept those offers."

Correction: This article originally failed to note that Catholic University President David M. O'Connell's base salary is paid to his religious order, the Congregation of the Mission, not to O'Connell personally.**

Older alums just can't wrap their minds around the annual John Carroll weekends at which the President of the "old GU" can't get up and pray the traditional Mass. Eh ... it took Harvard only a half-dozen presidencies before they installed a non-minister member of the laity. Look at how "well" their "religious identity" has held up despite that, huh?



** Added note: Fr. O'Connell was recently named bishop of Trenton, NJ, and the new President at Catholic University -- the flagship college of Vatican interests in the U.S. -- will be the (lay) former Dean of Boston College Law School. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/07/06/AR2010070604690.html

Another link is local to NJ but with a reference to national stats for another religious order and its colleges (Dominicans) plus generic stats (about all "religious" orders):

http://www.nj.com/news/mustsee/index.ssf/2009/06/caldwell_college_president_aft.html


What's happening at Caldwell College is not new. Since Werner became president in 1994, the number of nuns nationwide has steadily and dramatically thinned. As a result, it has become increasingly rare for a nun to lead a Catholic college. Of the 18 Dominican colleges and universities in the U.S., Werner said, her retirement will leave just three with presidents from the religious order.

Fewer than half of the roughly 250 Catholic institutions nationwide are headed by nuns or priests, according to the Association of Catholic Colleges and Universities, compared with 70 percent in 1993.

Zag 77
07-17-2010, 06:58 PM
The Jesuits have some explaining to do, but of course they won't. Why did they depose Fr. Spitzer if there are no worthy Jesuit replacements out there? By all accounts GU was thriving under Fr. Spitzer. The Board loved him, he wanted to stay and the benefactors were generous.

Now Fr. Spitzer has no particular assignment from the Jesuits, and he is basically out to pasture in his 50's.

Dr. McCulloh may be a great guy, but this whole episode was unnecessary.

Angelo Roncalli
07-19-2010, 03:54 PM
** Added note: Fr. O'Connell was recently named bishop of Trenton, NJ, and the new President at Catholic University -- the flagship college of Vatican interests in the U.S. -- will be the (lay) former Dean of Boston College Law School. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/07/06/AR2010070604690.html
]

Spitzer was offered the job at Catholic--he wasn't much interested.

NJZag
07-20-2010, 05:11 AM
http://presidentialsearch.cua.edu/May-Update.cfm

First and second round interviews were in March and April 2010 and presumably drawing from a pool of candidates that the Spencer Stuart executive search firm put together; was he on a "short list"?

Old post from 2009:
http://www.guboards.com/showthread.php?t=20358

RenoZag
07-22-2010, 07:37 PM
Now Fr. Spitzer has no particular assignment from the Jesuits, and he is basically out to pasture in his 50's.



Great Video of Fr. Spitzer (http://www.spitzercenter.org/html/posts/video-story-fr.-spitzerrsquos-inspiring-talk-at-the-crozier-gala-73.php)

Yeah, he sure looks like he doesn't have anything to do. . .

TheBeast
07-22-2010, 10:25 PM
Great Video of Fr. Spitzer (http://www.spitzercenter.org/html/posts/video-story-fr.-spitzerrsquos-inspiring-talk-at-the-crozier-gala-73.php)

Yeah, he sure looks like he doesn't have anything to do. . .

Thanks for the linkage, Reno. Great vid

Zag 77
07-23-2010, 01:20 PM
Fr. Spitzer doing speaking gigs and pursuing his interest in business and ethics are great, but not a full use of his talents. The Jesuits are shorthanded everywhere.

229SintoZag
07-29-2010, 05:38 PM
Gonzaga is a Jesuit school. It ought to have a Jesuit President.

montanazag88
03-30-2011, 09:36 PM
Gonzaga is a Jesuit school. It ought to have a Jesuit President.

GU is not only missing a President, it is missing Spitzer and his unmatched combination of Catholic knowledge and wisdom. I just learned today from the following web site the Academic VP, Patricia Killmen, approved of next month's presentation of "The Vagina Monologues," a production created to end violence against women, but rejected for years by Spitzer's administration as clearly containing demeaning content.

http://www.cardinalnewmansociety.org/Home/tabid/36/ctl/Details/mid/435/ItemID/854/Default.aspx

On a similar note, if any of you alumni have been to a GU bookstore in the last few years and read the "enlightenment" materials featured in abundance, you likely understand the loss of GU's Catholic identity. The liberal professors have for years attempted to oust Spitzer based on his close adherence to Catholic Doctrine which have prevented such controversial exposures to the children of unsuspecting Catholic parents/supporters of the University.

I anticipate Thane will hear from many on his lack of judgement and will no longer support this move to a more Notre Dame-like approach to Catholic University administrative leadership. GU is no longer educating the people the world needs most....to the contrary, it is supporting cultural relativism which has never led to anything short of social decline.

Many have no idea how valuable Spitzer was/is to GU - a modern day Augustine and much more.

webspinnre
03-31-2011, 08:35 AM
Even more disturbing is that VP Killmen referenced Ex Corde Ecclesiae in support of the production of VM on campus. While I guess its good that she knows of its existence, its unfortunate that she either doesn't understand it, or is deliberately obfuscating.

Angelo Roncalli
03-31-2011, 12:10 PM
TO: Gonzaga Faculty, Staff and Students

FROM: Patricia O’Connell Killen, Academic Vice President

RE: Upcoming Programming on Women, Violence, and Catholic Teaching

DATE: March 17, 2011

Each year, the Gonzaga community hosts a series of events focused on increasing awareness about, and eliminating acts of violence against, women. Incidents of violence against women are an issue for college campuses in particular; Gonzaga has this year put focus on these behaviors and the situations that give rise to them through activities such as the Green Dot program.

During the week of April 4-10, 2011, the Women & Gender Studies Program, the English Department, the Sociology Department, the Honors Program, and the Institute for Hate Studies are together sponsoring an academic series entitled: “({Monologues, Dialogues, & Stories}): An Interdisciplinary Academic Discussion on Women’s Narratives, Catholic Theologies, Violence Against Women and ‘The Vagina Monologues’.”

The week will include three interrelated events: (1) a panel presentation and discussion entitled “Voices on ‘The Vagina Monologues’, Catholic Tradition, and Jesuit Identity” [April 4]; (2) “Learning to Speak: the Power of Narratives” -- an exploration of the power of storytelling and the place of stories in movements toward social justice [April 6]; and, (3) a reader’s theatre presentation of “The Vagina Monologues” followed by a faculty-moderated “talk back” with cast and crew [April 10]. More information about the three events, including auditions for the story slam that follows “Learning to Speak” and roles in “The Vagina Monologues” will be available by week’s end.

It is widely acknowledged that “The Vagina Monologues” is considered by many a provocative, if not controversial, play. This reader’s theatre presentation of “The Vagina Monologues” will not be a public event. The play is being performed in the context of an interdisciplinary academic exploration, using a model of mutual learning by doing and reflecting that is employed regularly in classrooms at the university. This performance of “The Vagina Monologues” is exclusively by and for Gonzaga students, faculty and staff. Attendance at this event, as with each of those planned, is entirely voluntary.

“The Vagina Monologues” contains raw language and explicit descriptions of sexual behavior. The particular monologues in the play are composites developed from experiences of actual women. They are, for many, disturbing. As is the case for much activist art, significant numbers of people have found the subject matter and language to be offensive. The faculty and students who have organized this week view the play as an opportunity to engage in a cultural dialogue that explores women’s experiences of identity, sexual assault, the role of power in relationships and the social structures and attitudes that affect and shape all of these, and the place of disruptive art in movements for social justice.

The seriousness of the issue the week highlights -- violence against women, and Gonzaga’s responsibility as a Jesuit, Catholic university to engage critically at the boundaries of culture where “the burning exigencies of humanity and the perceived message of the Gospel” are joined -- led to my decision to support this project (Address of Pope Benedict to General Congregation 35). If, as Ex Corde Ecclesiae (“From the Heart of the Church”) states, “ . . . by its Catholic character, a University is made more capable of conducting an impartial search for truth, a search that is neither subordinated to nor conditioned by particular interest of any kind,” then faculty, staff and students at Gonzaga are called to attend to and reflect on their own assumptions and presuppositions, and to engage in discourse about experiences of sexual violence, controversial art, ideas and events with scholarly charity (Ex Corde Ecclesiae, Introduction, Section 7). Difficult and unpleasant human experiences cannot be denied in a Catholic university’s engagement with the larger culture.

This week of programming is focused primarily on narrative and voice as a means for exploring issues of violence against women. Equally important to understanding the issue of violence against women are the themes of Catholic theologies of the body and Catholic teaching on sexuality. These will be explored by a series of speakers later this spring and in the fall. The first of these presenters, moral theologian Dr. James Halstead, O.S.A., chair of the Department of Religious Studies at DePaul University, will be at Gonzaga on Monday, April 18, speaking on Catholic perspectives on violence and broken bodies. More information on his lecture and on subsequent speakers will be forthcoming.

The presentation of “The Vagina Monologues” on campus in no way implies that the University condones or supports particular values and behaviors expressed in the play or by its author. However, it is not in the tradition of Jesuit, Catholic education to avoid ideas or attitudes that are different from our own, but instead to critically engage them in respectful dialogue so that everyone may come to a deeper understanding of the truth. It is in this spirit that the faculty have chosen to evaluate issues of women’s violence and empowerment through this series of events. Thank you.

TheBeast
03-31-2011, 05:26 PM
Hi. Grad of '02 here. I'm glad that we can have completely different viewpoints and we don't result to calling anyone a "blockhead," even with the anonymity of the Internet.

Anyone? Anyone?

Once and Future Zag
04-01-2011, 09:04 AM
It's sad that a Jesuit University has to even explicitly state that last paragraph. The use of art that is not "rigorously" Catholic in education should not require justification.


. . . it is not in the tradition of Jesuit, Catholic education to avoid ideas or attitudes that are different from our own, but instead to critically engage them in respectful dialogue so that everyone may come to a deeper understanding of the truth.

Where's the outrage at Beowulf, Shakespeare, or Marlowe being taught? There's plenty of wickedness therein.

Zag 77
04-01-2011, 10:47 AM
Jesuits have always seemed to find themselves in a state of conflict in issues of Catholic doctrine. It is ironic in that Ignatius Loyola initially envisioned a very strict and ascetic environment and devotion to prayer life before he modified his view such that Jesuits "would be in the world, but not of the world." We can debate ad infinitum whether the Jesuits in general and GU in particular have adhered to Ignatian principles.

Suffice it to say that in the eyes of the Oregon Province of the Society of Jesus, Fr. Spitzer is a good orthodox Catholic, but maybe not in the mainstream of the modern Jesuit world view.

Thus, he was guilty and had to be removed.

cjm720
04-01-2011, 11:21 AM
Suffice it to say that in the eyes of the Oregon Province of the Society of Jesus, Fr. Spitzer is a good orthodox Catholic, but maybe not in the mainstream of the modern Jesuit world view.

Thus, he was guilty and had to be removed.

Can you please expand on this? I think I'm missing your point.

lothar98zag
04-01-2011, 01:15 PM
It's sad that a Jesuit University has to even explicitly state that last paragraph. The use of art that is not "rigorously" Catholic in education should not require justification.



Where's the outrage at Beowulf, Shakespeare, or Marlowe being taught? There's plenty of wickedness therein.

agree w/ O&FZ

Zag 77
04-01-2011, 02:20 PM
CJM, the complete answer would take a long discussion, but let me summarize it here and others can weigh in. When Fr. Spitzer came in (at a time of crisis at GU) he explicitly said he had a goal of increasing the "Catholic Identity" of Gonzaga University. Under the last several Superiors General of the Society of Jesus, the Jesuits have supported a theological movement that has brought it into conflict with the Vatican. During the pontificate of John Paul II, this was especially noted during the administation of the late Fr. Pedro Arrupe, SJ, as Superior General. To overly simplify this, the Jesuits have tended to identify with a view of social justice that is much more liberal than the church as a whole. They also would tend to dissent from Vatican positions fairly frequently. American Jesuits and the Oregon Provnce of the Society reflect that conflict. Therefore, a Jesuit whose theology is supportive of the former and current Pope is going to tend to be on the outs with the Jesuit powers that be.

That is why, despite the success of the University under his term, and great support from the Board, Spitzer is gone, even though the Jesuits had no Jesuit replacement for him.

Zag 77
04-02-2011, 07:38 PM
Coincidentally Fr. Spitzer is at GU Law School giving a couple of lectures in a few days:

http://news.gonzaga.edu/archives/6809?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+GonzagaUniversityNewsService+ %28Gonzaga+University+News+Service%29

montanazag88
04-03-2011, 02:19 PM
CJM, the complete answer would take a long discussion, but let me summarize it here and others can weigh in. When Fr. Spitzer came in (at a time of crisis at GU) he explicitly said he had a goal of increasing the "Catholic Identity" of Gonzaga University. Under the last several Superiors General of the Society of Jesus, the Jesuits have supported a theological movement that has brought it into conflict with the Vatican. During the pontificate of John Paul II, this was especially noted during the administation of the late Fr. Pedro Arrupe, SJ, as Superior General. To overly simplify this, the Jesuits have tended to identify with a view of social justice that is much more liberal than the church as a whole. They also would tend to dissent from Vatican positions fairly frequently. American Jesuits and the Oregon Provnce of the Society reflect that conflict. Therefore, a Jesuit whose theology is supportive of the former and current Pope is going to tend to be on the outs with the Jesuit powers that be.

That is why, despite the success of the University under his term, and great support from the Board, Spitzer is gone, even though the Jesuits had no Jesuit replacement for him.

Spitzer is a Catholic intellectual who applied rubber to the road in every aspect of Catholic Faith. His books and teachings are an extention of his genius in action - challenging, successfully in my view, the notions of atheism, modern physics and much more. One could not find a more effective leader of university students and acedemia.

In terms of the play, relativism is not the answer and it seems the Academic VP knows not the difference between sponsorship and censorship. The play is in fact an attempt to shock and offend using what many call pronographic material to accomplish the objective of learning. This is a play, not a classroom discussion. Any such notions that students have no other/better means of understanding violence is to fold into a social acceptance of "hollywood-style" learning - what absolute nonsense. Debbie Does Dallas effects no more higher level capabilities of understanding the devaluation of human beings than an abortion clinic does to promote the tenants of the pro-life movement.