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ZagNative
04-12-2009, 05:18 AM
Another Zag to be proud of, from the News Tribune (http://www.thenewstribune.com/boling/story/706890.html):
Serving at Hahn Air Force Base in Germany, Burgess averaged better than 30 points a game and earned all-Air Force honors. Soon, he was being recruited by such schools as Kansas and USC. A friend on base, though, was a Gonzaga alum, and he contacted GU coach Hank Anderson about Burgess.

When Burgess visited Spokane, the first place he was taken was not the gym, but the office of Fr. Edmund Morton, president of the university.

“He said, if you come here, it’s to get an education,” Burgess recalled. “It wasn’t that you will play ball and then we’ll get you out the door. It was the only place I went to where anybody said anything like that.

“You have to remember, I had gotten out of the service and I was married with twin girls,” he said. “Everything I owned was in a foot locker. I wanted to hear that kind of talk because I was all about business. I wasn’t about hanging out and having fun, I was about getting my education and taking care of my family.”
.... the Zags traveled across the country to take on nationally ranked Providence. Coach Anderson thought the big challenge would be stopping senior guard Johnny Egan, so he decided to give Burgess an easier job on the defensive end, checking the “other” guard … Lenny Wilkens.

Wilkens, a Hall of Fame player and coach, was aware of Burgess’ reputation as the nation’s leading scorer.

“He was a terrific player,” Wilkens recalled. “He was a real hustler who could score. We played that one game when they came to Providence, and it was a good, close game.”

Wilkens’ Friars nipped Burgess and the Zags, 81-80.
“Some of my friends were going to law school,” he said. “They said they thought I should give it a try.”

His grades were good enough for admission, so the dean of the law school sent him in for the Law School Aptitude Test. When he passed, he found himself back in school with a family to raise.

“Once I started studying law, I started liking it more and more,” he said. Good thing, because he worked 40 hours a week for Washington Water Power while going through law school.

“I would work the midnight shift to 7 or 8 every morning,” he said. “I handled the emergency phones for power outages and that sort of thing. I was able to take books from the law library down there and study whenever the phone wasn’t ringing.”

But what about sleep?

“I’d get a nap here and there, just the best you could get,” he said. “For a while, I was doing a little assistant coaching for Hank, too. There was never any sitting around with my feet up. But all those things, it’s a matter of how badly do you want it. When you have to provide for your family, you get the work done.
Burgess is going to be out of court for a while as he recovers from a serious back surgery. When he was in the hospital, old friend Lenny Wilkens came to visit.

“When I got traded out here (to the Seattle SuperSonics), we rekindled the friendship,” Wilkens said. “We had a mutual friend (Judge Jack Tanner). When you look at what Frank has accomplished, it shows you how dedicated and how smart he’s always been. To be such an important figure in the community is a marvelous accomplishment by a wonderful man.”

Rangerzag
04-12-2009, 05:35 AM
Nice find ZN!

Much more in original article once you hit the link and give Dave the online credit. Interesting perspective on his honor's early upbringing.

Radbooks
04-12-2009, 07:59 AM
What a great read! I didn't know anything about his background, so this was a wonderful and interesting article. I certainly can't imagine working that hard... going to law school, working all night, and having a family... oh, and helping out with some coaching too! :)

Thanks, ZagNative!

Rangerzag
04-12-2009, 09:38 AM
This really is a great presentation in hard print. It is side to side complete on the front sports page of the Tribune, 5 1/2 inches above the fold continuing another 7 inches below.

http://media.thenewstribune.com/smedia/2009/04/12/00/286-833425.highlight.prod_affiliate.5.jpg


This picture shows a little more than 6 inches wide and 9 inches tall.

Very nice coverage for a fine gentleman :)

ZagNative
04-12-2009, 12:10 PM
Jim Meehan (http://www.spokesman.com/blogs/sportslink/2009/apr/12/burgess-star-court-and-court/) has a reference and link to Boling's story on his blog today, with another great picture of His Honor at the ceremony when his number was retired February 19, 2005:
http://media.spokesman.com/photos/2005/02/19/spt19flett_02-19-2005_DB3REKU_t450.jpg

And I challenge all here present to name me a Zag who ever suited up sporting a better-looking pair of gams than #44!

http://i237.photobucket.com/albums/ff232/ZagNative/NBA/Others/FrankBurgesspreparestoshoot.jpg


Of his playing days, he first points out how silly he looked “running around in those little britches.”

Let's hear it for those "little britches!"

ZagNative
04-12-2009, 05:04 PM
For an even better read about Frank Burgess, see Steve Robinson's great story from April 29, 2004, on GUNation.com (http://gonzaga.scout.com/2/256181.html). The piece is just full of marvelous details.

In the fall of 1958 when Frank Burgess arrived on campus, Gonzaga had an enrollment of 1808 students. There were only two dormitories. GU fielded teams in five men’s sports: basketball, baseball, cross-country, golf and tennis. There were no women’s athletics. The basketball uniforms were blue; a pale shade called “Columbia blue,” and had sleeves. The GU teams were known by three interchangeable nicknames: Bulldogs, Zags and Irish. Hank Anderson was the head basketball coach and athletic director. Former boxing coach Joey August served as the team trainer. The Zags played their home games off campus in the 6,500-seat Spokane Coliseum; there was no suitable facility on campus. The practice facilities were primitive, the only gym on campus was on the first floor of the Ad Building in the space now occupied by Russell Theatre. Burgess remembers that the gym had limited “creature comforts”: “It would get so hot in there, we’d open the doors. The ball would then inevitably go out the doors and someone would have to run like hell to get it before it went out into the street on Boone Avenue. Our shower room was in the basement; we called it ‘The Dungeon.’”
Frank Burgess joined a Gonzaga program in the fall of 1958 that had just made the transition from NAIA to NCAA D-1 competition as an independent under Coach Hank Anderson. Burgess quickly formed a bond with his new coach. That admiration is still present 46 years later when Burgess speaks of playing for Anderson: “Hank loved his ballplayers. When he brought you in there, he wanted to see that you had a good career on the court and that you had a full experience.” The strong bond between the coach and his players still remains; a few years ago, Burgess and some of his teammates who had played for Anderson honored their former coach with a banquet in Las Vegas and presented Anderson and his wife Betty with a ten-day cruise.And I loved this:
The 1958-59 Zags featured the outside shooting and penetration of Frank Burgess and the post presence of the 7’3” 400 pound Frenchman, Jean Claude Lefebvre. In a bit of pre-season publicity and fund-raising, Coach Anderson had Burgess and Lefebvre stand next to the toll booth on the newly-opened Maple Street Toll Bridge holding chef’s hats into which drivers were encouraged to match the toll by dropping an extra dime for Gonzaga basketball. Burgess chuckles as he describes the stunt: “I’d just come to Spokane and here I was standing out in the cold holding a hat. I remember wondering, ‘what in the world is this all about?’” The Spokesman Review sent a photographer to cover the appearance and a picture showing Burgess and Lefebvre holding the hats appeared in the newspaper. A few years back, Fr. Frank Costello sent Burgess a yellowed clipping of the event from the Review. Burgess keeps it with his basketball memorabilia treasures in his desk.To the author of that piece, known to post here on guboards from time to time: Nice job! Thanks!

Birddog
04-12-2009, 05:32 PM
There were only two dormitories. I'm pretty sure there were at least 3, The newly constructed Welch and Madonna,and the long standing DeSmet. I believe the ladies were also housed just off campus perhaps in the old house on the SW corner of Boone and Hamilton. I'm sure Gamagin would remember, for that matter you might also ZN. For some reason, I keep thinking the present Crimont is a reincarnation of a previous Crimont. There was also a residence called Derochier (sp) Hall, and I think it was the big old house that used to stand on the NE corner of Mission and Hamilton where the Safeway now sits. It may have been run by some entity other than GU, perhaps the Sisters of the Holy Names? We need some old timers from the neighborhood to weigh in on this.

Bulldogs, Zags and Irish. I don't remember them ever being referred to as the "Irish", I believe that had been dropped years before. I also think that Hank changed the colors from the old dark blue to the light "Columbia" blue, although no one seems to be able to confirm this and no one seems to know why. Where is Wilf (Fr Schoenberg sp? the archivist) when you need him?

ZagNative
04-12-2009, 06:09 PM
After consultation with my sister, who is even older than I am, if that's to be believed, we come up with the following:

The woman's dorm at the corner of Boone and Hamilton was called Loretto Hall and housed women from Holy Names college (now Maplewood Gardens retirement communuty), which I attended after HNA. The place at Hamilton and Mission, Durocher Hall, also housed HNC women. Other housing for HNC women was available at Marion Hall on Sharp.

We think you're right about there being three dormitories - Welch, DeSmet, and Madonna.

I have some pretty fond and funny memories of Welch, when I was a student at Holy Names Academy, probably in '59 or '60, joining a carload of classmates in sitting in a car parked across the street from the dorm to watch a parade of the young fellows go into the laundry room in their skivies to iron their trousers for a night out. We howled! Entertainment came cheap in those days.

Birddog
04-12-2009, 06:28 PM
A little research produced this. It mentions that there was an original Crimont Hall.
http://www.zagsonline.org/s/829/index.aspx?sid=829&gid=1&pgid=534
I thought maybe those were run by HNA. Marion Hall was built around '57 and was for HS girls IIRC. I'd forgotten the name Loretto Hall and you may well be correct. I do know that later a family moved in and lived there (Boone and Hamilton) for awhile. Their name was Davis.

ZagNative
04-12-2009, 06:46 PM
Fun stuff in that link, Birddog! Thanks.

Dogtownkid
04-12-2009, 10:11 PM
Marian Hall was built a little earlier than '57--probably '55 or '56 would be my guess. It housed women from Holy Names College (now Maplewood Gardens). It took the place of the two original dorms, Durocher Hall and Loretto Hall. Dorocher Hall was of course torn down pretty early. Probably about '55, but Loretto lasted longer--until the parking lot at the corner of Boone and Sharp was put in.

My memory stretches back verrrrry far, but not as far as a woman I know who attended Gonzaga the first year that women were allowed. She had been in the Navy during WWII and attended GU on the GI Bill of Rights.

Birddog
04-13-2009, 04:18 AM
I won't quibble on the date for Marion. Durocher Hall was razed to make way for a service station, a Texaco I believe. That was probably pre 1960 by just a little. I had long been removed from Spokane when the service station was razed for the Safeway. Does anybody know the year when the Holy Names college moved to Ft Wright and became "Ft Wright College of the Holy Names" (I think that was their official name)? I ask because I distinctly recall going to a "social" at Marion Hall when I was in 8th or more likely 9th grade (1961 or '62) to meet some of the girls boarding there. I think it was all HS girls, but could be mistaken. The nuns had the right idea trying to let the girls socialize, but the rules were too constricting and we (the local boys) all bailed after one or two "socials". I seem to recall seeing one of the more outgoing girls up at the pharmacy occasionally.

A little aside here. In the early 50's, there were but three service stations on the stretch of Hamilton from Trent to Illinois. Starting at Boone, on NW corner was a Phillips66 with the diagonal design. Next up was a Chevron on the SW corner of Mission and Hamilton. It was a tiny place with a separate garage, and was operated by Harry Frazier for several years. It became a dry cleaners. The garage portion was almost right against Bernie's Tavern.
Across the street on the NW corner was a Shell Station, it got modernized in the late 50's and was the biggest by far. Ernie Davis ran it for a long time.

To the best of my knowledge, there were no more N of there. The service station boom of the late 50's early 60's brought in all the new ones. The neighborhood kids always liked the "grand openings" because we always got free pop, balloons, and other junk. In no particular order the new stations popped up on the NE corner of Sharp and Hamilton, ENCO was the brand (I think) originally. There was another at about the NE corner of Ermina and Hamilton, it was also a Chevron or perhaps a Standard (it might have been the replacement for the tiny one on Mission and Hamilton) Ray Amicarella ran that one, he was JHoops uncle IIRC. There was one more on the SW corner of Baldwin and Hamilton (I think), I can't remember the brand, but it might have been an ARCO. There was also one other old one up around the bend on Illinois on the right, it was either a Signal or a Flying A. Something tells me I'm missing one, I'm pretty sure there was also a Mobil somewhere near, maybe on the SW corner of Indiana and Hamilton?

Dogtownkid
04-13-2009, 08:45 PM
Is that a guy thing--remembering the locations of all the service stations? You have amazing recall!

Birddog
04-14-2009, 05:37 AM
Is that a guy thing--remembering the locations of all the service stations?
Maybe so. They were important social/economic milestones back then. The infusion of new stations went along with the middle class becoming more affluent, buying cars with fins, and sometimes even a 2nd car for the wife, and becoming more mobile. As a kindergartner, I walked from Sinto to Logan School, so I was pretty familiar with all the businesses along the route. As I grew older the service stations started popping up, replacing vacant lots and old residences. Back then as you probably recall, many of the stations had the operators name across the building or canopy like "HARRY FRAZIER CHEVRON", or "ERNIE DAVIS SHELL". Families tended to trade at a particular station for many reasons. It could be the service or perhaps the owners church affiliation along with the convenience. They were of course "full service" back then. Remember that? The simple answer is yeah it probably is a guy thing. I whiled away a few hours a week at the local stations when I was a pre-teen and teenager. I also spent a little time in Leonard's Machine Shop which was right next to Bernie's on the alley, and of course we all spent time at the "Freeze" and across the street at Bill Stephens Pharmacy and Drug Store. I guess in away, the strip of Hamilton from Boone N to Mission and maybe even to Augusta was our version of a mall.

Starting at Boone and going N on the W side of the street there was a Phillips 66, then Shoe Repair, Marshall Wells Hardware, and the IGA. Off the street was the Medical Building housing Wendle, Morton, Nishimura, et. al., then on the corner was the Dairy Freeze. Across Sharp was the Bulldog Tavern (originally about 60' W of the corner), a 2 story apt house (wood) then Johnson's 24 Flavors (The Chef). N across Sinto was another 2 story apt building (brick) that later was razed for a Bank, Leonard's Machine Shop, Bernie's Tavern, then the Chevron which later became a dry cleaners. N across Mission, was the Shell station and a small frame building that also housed a dry cleaners (I think, but it may have been a beauty parlor not sure about that though). N across Augusta was the area's first modern laundromat and self service dry cleaners, then the old frame building that was Locust Foods.

Going S from Mission on the E side was the Safeway, then Sprouse-Ritz 5 and 10 (the buildings were later combined to make a larger Safeway). The next building housed a variety of restaurants, but most notable were August's which later became Genos. Next S was a small building that housed a Barber Shop. The block between Sinto and Sharp was notable because it didn't have any businesses for a long time until around 1960 when the Norge laundromat was built on the SE corner of Hamilton and Sinto and at about the same time the ENCO was built on the NE corner of Sharp and Hamilton. S of Sharp was the building housing the University Pharmacy and Joey's Tavern with the apartments upstairs. S of the alley was another building that housed yet another dry cleaners and off and on a restaurant, the Daley Burg for one. We had it all, 3 service stations, 3 taverns, 3 eateries, 2 or 3 laundry/dry cleaners, 2 grocery (3 if you count Locust), variety store, barber and beauty shops, hardware store and shoe repair. The only essentials you were hard pressed to buy in the area were shoes and clothes, for those you had to catch the bus and go downtown.

Angelo Roncalli
04-14-2009, 05:50 AM
A little research produced this. It mentions that there was an original Crimont Hall.
http://www.zagsonline.org/s/829/index.aspx?sid=829&gid=1&pgid=534
I thought maybe those were run by HNA. Marion Hall was built around '57 and was for HS girls IIRC. I'd forgotten the name Loretto Hall and you may well be correct. I do know that later a family moved in and lived there (Boone and Hamilton) for awhile. Their name was Davis.


The Davis family still owned the house in the late '70's when I was at GU, though I'm not sure they still lived there. I think it was being used as some kind of group home then, but I'm a little foggy.

BD, where the Martins living at 808 E. Sharp when you were in the neighborhood? That house is now been converted into apartments.

gamagin
04-14-2009, 07:35 AM
The Davis family still owned the house in the late '70's when I was at GU, though I'm not sure they still lived there. I think it was being used as some kind of group home then, but I'm a little foggy.

BD, where the Martins living at 808 E. Sharp when you were in the neighborhood? That house is now been converted into apartments.

before the Davis', that building housed at least two orders of nuns, at different times. First were some Holy Names nuns (who left when they moved to Fort Wright) and later, another order took over the house for a time before the Davis' bought it and moved in, lived there for several years and eventually turned it into a nursing home. The Davis' then moved the nursing home operation up to E. Illinois (perhaps selling to GU, I'm not sure). They converted an old mansion into Davis nursing home and eventually built an addition on the property. In the 1980's or 90's, , they ran into regulation problems and either sold or were shuttered. I believe the structures are vacated but still there to this day.

re: the martins and their large family - they purchased that brick home in the early '70's and remained there for about 10-15 years. One of the beautiful Martin girls was our babysitter for several years.

gamagin
04-14-2009, 07:46 AM
Marian Hall was built a little earlier than '57--probably '55 or '56 would be my guess. It housed women from Holy Names College (now Maplewood Gardens). It took the place of the two original dorms, Durocher Hall and Loretto Hall. Dorocher Hall was of course torn down pretty early. Probably about '55, but Loretto lasted longer--until the parking lot at the corner of Boone and Sharp was put in.

My memory stretches back verrrrry far, but not as far as a woman I know who attended Gonzaga the first year that women were allowed. She had been in the Navy during WWII and attended GU on the GI Bill of Rights.


re above: you mention "until the parking lot at the corner of Boone and Sharp was put in."

That would have to be either Boone & Hamilton or Sharp and Hamilton as those two streets both run east & west and never meet. Hamilton, otoh, goes N & S and does interstect. Yes ? I'm guessing it's Boone & hamilton, what has been referred to as the Davis home in this thread.

Birddog
04-14-2009, 07:47 AM
Thanks for the details Gamagin. Were those the same Martins that previously lived across the street? I believe the Asian/American family that lived there (about 813 mid block) was named Martin, but I could be mistaken.

gamagin
04-14-2009, 08:58 AM
Thanks for the details Gamagin. Were those the same Martins that previously lived across the street? I believe the Asian/American family that lived there (about 813 mid block) was named Martin, but I could be mistaken.

the family Angelo was referring to (I believe) lived on the 800 block of E. Sharp. Roughly across the street from raneys. The mother (Mary?) is filipino. dad (Phil) worked at kaiser. 4-5 kids, the boys were all very handsome and the girls beautiful.

A second, unrelated, Martin family, I am positive you know, lived on the 700 block of E. Sharp, north side, mid block: dave, john, pete, Joanie.

Birddog
04-14-2009, 09:12 AM
OK just to clarify, the AsianAmerican kids for a few years lived in the 800 block on the N side of the street, between Kolbets and Raney's side yard (later Apts). That same family then moved across the street? after my time probably.
I do remember the other Martins as well, I guess they must have lived next door to Stimson's, is that right? The two Martins was making it cloudy there for awhile, glad you cleared that up.

Here's a test for you, does the name Peteris Jemsa (sp?) ring a bell? 10 bonus points if you get it right (keep quiet Angelo).

Dogtownkid
04-14-2009, 09:45 AM
I meant to say Boone and Hamilton.

It's a great puzzle to me how you all remember the neighborhood in such great detail. I lived on Baldwin from 1950 to 1958 and then during the school year of 1959-60, when I went off to seek my fortune in the wilds of the Mojave desert. I remember landmarks such as the Bulldog, Joey's, and the 24 Flavors, but not too much else.

Maybe my faulty memory is the result of having my nose buried in a book for most of those years.

Or maybe it's because I'm so d*mned old.

gamagin
04-14-2009, 09:47 AM
I wrote some time ago somewhere on this GUB that Frank Burgess came down the alley on occasion and shot hoops with us kids at what we affectionately called The 714 Club. the club was actually our home at 714 E. Boone.

that same address is now the address of the Rosauer's Higher Education Center. From 1946-to the mid 80's, it was home. It was also home to several boarders who came from as far away as Japan and another foreigh country, known as Butte, America, to name just a few, to attend Gonzaga. Mom, Dad, five sons and 2-3 boarders, crammed into the house year after year and got along as well as any herd of cats could be expected to.

And we did. In fact, we loved everything about our lives and the neighborhood and the energy that was that wonderful sweet spot on the planet, nestled right up to the Gonzaga Campus, which we treated as our own backyard, because it was.

The alley behind the Higher Ed Center leads you west a half block & directly into what is now Welch Hall. When I first became aware of life, the spot where Welch hall sits was the Giese House. Helen Conway lived on the corner and the old gonzaga Hi School, made up of WW II barracks strung end to end, snaked back towards Desmet hall and then north towards Boone Avenue behind the Geise and Conway homes, in that open space now between DeSmet and Welch.

Just off that alley, on our property, there was a dilapidated garage whose doors had been beaten mercilessly, night and day, as the backstop for everything from rocks to basketballs, baseballs, our heads, neighbors heads -- you name it. For above the door was the basketball hoop, poorly nailed (not screwed) to a wooden (splintered) backboard and on which was a usually-broken net that couldn't quite be put back where it belonged but, nevertheless, wouldn't completely fall off, either. It perfectly matched the garage.

But it was here, in this neighborhood field of daily and nightly & yearly battles, between rock fights and kick the can marathons, that the Great Frank Burgess used to join in our games of Horse.

He would occasionally walk down the alley, perhaps wondering what all the noise was about, or perhaps just returning to (or from) campus after going to the store (the IGA, where Starbucks now is located). He would stop, usually briefly, and join in.

Invariably, someone would challenge him to a game of horse. Or HOR (we thought this hilarious, but it was actually a game to three instead of five -- get it -- HOR ?)

Or he'd just take a few shots. we loved it and we think he did, too. There was always plenty of laughter and we all had watched him play many times, so we knew who he was and were excited to have him appear.

As noted above, this was half a block from welch Hall, where Zagnative and her girlfriends used to go to look at naked students iron their clothes.

We, too, went to Welch Hall. Often. We, too, had our reasons. Welch Hall had a pop machine. Plus, the gentle giant, 7'-4" Jean Claude Lefevbre (sp?), lived there and we used to visit him during holidays. He was usually in the dorm alone during holiday breaks because he had no place else to go. Coach Hank Anderson and others would entertain him as best they could, but there was alot of alone time for the big Frenchman and we had no trouble stopping by to gawk and wish him well and do all the silly stuff young kids did to be pests.

But the frequency of our Welch Hall forays was to get to the pop machine. It was our neighborhood cool down spot after a workout in our "gym." We'd bring our can opener and some straws, climb through a window or walk through an open door, into the basement Welch Hall rec room/laundry area, where the pop machine was stationed.

We'd open the lid, pop open whatever soda we wanted (tru flavors, creme soda was my personal fave) insert the straw, and drink it.

This tack avoided the muss and fuss of actually putting a dime into the coin slot and actually removing the bottle, the way GU and the pop company intended.

But our way took care of the critical problem and reality we mostly dealt with besides our powerful thirst. And that was the fact that we had no dimes.

Birddog
04-14-2009, 10:20 AM
Gamagin brings up some fond memories. Those old pop machines which he describes were a real pain to operate on the up and up, snaking your desired bottle around the tracks till you could get it out of the machines jaws. Many times the machine would eat your money and not release the bottle. I never confessed to such thefts as gamagin describes because I always thought I was just getting back to even. I didn't live quite as close as gamagin, but I reckon he and I were on the same side of a few snow ball fights that we would start with the "college boys". We also had some fun jamming the elevator over at Welch, or putting on the emergency stop between floors when we saw some one put the call light on.

Our moms to a number sent us off to St Als well scrubbed with cheeks all rosy in our salt and peppers and our solid colored shirts. By the time we returned home after school and after some of the battles gamagin describes,we more closely resembled some characters from Oliver Twist. We weren't exactly rag pickers, but to say we looked disheveled was to put it mildly. It was all in a days fun, and it was a great neighborhood to live in. Jean Claude sightings and the resultant tale were always special events, I didn't see Burgess in the neighborhood that much, but I lived a few blocks further away.

I know gamagin remembers but some of you may recall the treehouse that stood on the SW corner of Cincinnati and Boone. It always looked like Swiss Family Robinson's to me as a small kid. I'll bet gamagin was in that thing a time or two perhaps even invited on some occasions.

ZagNative
04-14-2009, 11:23 AM
What a wonderful memoir of those special times, gamagin! I remember seeing Jean Claude towering above the congregation in the back row at 11:00 am Sunday Mass.

Other random memories:

Buildings: When I was at HNA (class of '60), the boarders lived on the top floor of the HNA building - sadly, now The Academy retirement community, devoid of all the wonderful mahogany and, saddest of all, without the elegant parlor that topped the long staircase of the main entrance. My heart fell when I visited there a few years ago and saw the parlor had given way to an enclosed space.

http://i237.photobucket.com/albums/ff232/ZagNative/Other/HolyNamesAcademy.jpg

The school exterior appeared in the 1993 movie, Benny and Joon, starring Johnny Depp and Mary Stuart Masterson.


Holy Names Building: What an elegant old building it was, so perfect for a girls' academy! I always entered the door on the Mission Avenue side, but the main entrance on the front of the building was impressive. At the top of the long flight of stairs, the Parlor was on the right, filled with elegant french provincial furniture and a big gold harp. Aside the parlor was a little alcove atop the stairs, which contained a small table. Toward the end of my sophomore year, I was unfortunate enough to have my desk in Sister Sheila Mary's home room, rifled by the good Sister Sheila, who confiscated a masterful collection of notes which my best friend Nancy and I whiled away class time composing for each other, complete with unladylike language and unflattering images of teachers we did not like (chin whiskers included). Sister Sheila was sufficiently appalled to call my mother for a meeting of the three of us in that alcove above the main stairwell, there for me to read the notes aloud in the presence of my sainted mother.


Sidenote about HNA and the rich and famous: A friend of mine told me a funny story about her friend from those days, the now famous tell-all biographer, Kitty Kelley, who was compelled by her mother to spend at least some time during our HNA tenure (she was in the class of '59) boarding at HNA. I can't imagine what Kelley had done to cross her mother, because as I recall she was ASB president and a pillar of the HNA community. In any event, Kitty put some of her chums up to the task of visiting the Kelley home (on High Drive, as I recall - Dad was the prominent attorney William Kelley of Davenport Kelley Witherspoon & Toole) and distracting Kitty's mother long enough that some in the group were able to sneak up to Kitty's room and toss a couple of prom dresses out the window to waiting co-spirators below, so Kitty would be able to attend the Autumn Whirl, the big dance.

Kitty's since had a pretty interesting life and career, apparently no worse for the wear from what were likely some trying teenage times in Spokane.


Gonzaga Law School: I was trying to remember where the law school would have been located when Frank Burgess attended, I think starting in '65. I know that it eventually ended up in the old Webster School building, but I remembered that building stood empry for many years when I was a child. The answer can be found here (http://www.law.gonzaga.edu/Library-and-Technology/About-Chastek-Library/History.asp), in this history of the law school:
1960s - Present

University President Father John Leary, S.J., seized the day when Spokane School District 81 put a nearby vacant grade school up for bid in July 1962. Webster School, built in 1901, had been the victim of a fire in 1945, been restored as a trade school, and finally left empty for several years. Father Leary acquired the building for $115,000. The old Webster school would be the home of the law library for the next thirty-eight years. Until the mid 1970s, the law library was open twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week, often unstaffed, on the honor system.

In the 1970s, the law school, formerly a night school, began offering day classes. Explosive growth quickly followed. The law school underwent several renovations in the early 70s. On November 7, 1971, a new wing of the library was dedicated. Further renovations in 1972 and 1973 also changed the shape of the library.

By the 1990s, the law school occupied the old Webster school and several adjacent buildings. Under Dean John Clute, fundraising was begun to build a new law school. The class of 2000 was the last to graduate from the old law building. When I was googling "Webster School," I found this interesting tidbit in a snippet from the book Bing Crosby: A Pocketfull of Dreams - the Early Years, 1903 - 1940 (http://books.google.com/books?id=Oa2_zcwucAgC&pg=PA37&lpg=PA37&dq=webster+grade+school+spokane&source=bl&ots=8DCOcT8Nfm&sig=dd4eFs91Y-AZCFQGKvxCgsByjGk&hl=en&ei=VtzkSZe9M462tAPc07CxCQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1), which I gather indicates Bing attended Webster School, future site of the old Law School:

http://i237.photobucket.com/albums/ff232/ZagNative/Other/BingCrosbyatWebsterSchool.jpg

gamagin
04-15-2009, 08:21 AM
<< I know gamagin remembers but some of you may recall the treehouse that stood on the SW corner of Cincinnati and Boone. It always looked like Swiss Family Robinson's to me as a small kid. I'll bet gamagin was in that thing a time or two perhaps even invited on some occasions.[/QUOTE]>>

Pat Hurley built it. Mrs. Hurley, fromer state rep., only recently sold the house after living there for some 60 years.

gamagin
04-15-2009, 08:29 AM
http://www.spokesmanreview.com/tools/story_pf.asp?ID=54978

Zagtana
04-20-2009, 07:26 PM
Great story on Mr. B. I was at GU when he was playing, what fun and a privilege to watch him in action. If memory serves, there was a ladies dorm, on the east side of the campus. My roomy at the men's dorm had a girl friend living there. There were certain visiting hours at the girls' dorm. Guys had to check in at the front desk, the desk clerk summoned the girl you were visiting while the guy waited in the lobby for her to come down. One night we guys had a few too many Olys and my roomy decided he wanted to visit his girl - after visiting hours. Her room was on the floor above the roof that covered the dorm's entry way. So he shimmied up the metal pole holding up that roof, then reached up and knocked on her window. Trouble was, she wasn't in there but her roommate was. She screamed, he jumped back and fell off the roof, the lights in the lobby went on, and we all ran - all that is except my roomy - his ankle was broken. And yes, he was booted out of school. But he didn't rat on us - although we really didn't do anything wrong except cheer him on. Oh, could I tell you some stories from those days - but my greatest thrill was watching Frank Burgess play.

Birddog
04-25-2009, 02:50 PM
Zagtana, you are referring to Madonna Hall. Here is a small picture and some more history I found while poking around the web. Good story BTW.
http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.gonzaga.edu/Academics/Libraries/Foley-Library/Departments/Special-Collections/exhibitions/ExhibitImages/MadonaHall.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.gonzaga.edu/Academics/Libraries/Foley-Library/Departments/Special-Collections/exhibitions/GonzagaHistory1946-print.asp&usg=__d-dIyyoh3QnXZ-CIOwSQecdJJQY=&h=116&w=144&sz=44&hl=en&start=3&sig2=qS0UMGtSOR4H0HtpUZkRkw&tbnid=0vc3PdaFL0cdCM:&tbnh=76&tbnw=94&prev=/images&#37;3Fq%3Dsite:www.gonzaga.edu%2Bmadonna%2Bhall %26gbv%3D2%26ndsp%3D20%26hl%3Den%26client%3Dfirefo x-a%26rls%3Dorg.mozilla:en-US:official&ei=dJLzSY_GDpjMMs-KgakP

rijman
12-03-2009, 08:58 PM
I recently joined this forum and just found this great thread. It brings back great memories. My father, Pete Rij, went to GU on a basketball scholarship coming off an Air Force team in the 50's. Because he was in a serious car accident the summer before attending he was never able to play for GU but Hank Anderson honored his scholarship and kept him on as an assistant. He stayed on after graduating with an engineering degree and was there when Frank Burgess arrived, he picked him up from the airport with Hank. Some of you related stories my dad told me hundreds of times like when Frank arrived at the campus he was told he was there to get an education first and that's what sold Frank on Gonzaga. My dad also talked about getting Frank a rental house, the landlord was talking to my dad about the property and my dad told him to talk to Frank because the place was for him, and immediately the home was no longer for rent. :confused:

The stories from that time period were great. My dad used to talk about the 7'+ Frenchman Lefebvre who if I remember correctly wanted to play more of the 2 or 3 rather than the 5 and Hank was always yelling at him to get under the basket. He talked of homer refs on road games where the Zags had all but 4 players foul out. The refs allowed Hank to put a 5th player back into the game, which was Frank, then gave him a technical when he entered the game. My dad talked about the game where Hank told Frank he was going to give him a break and he didn't have to cover the all American Egan, he would give him the other guard Lenny Wilkens. After the game Frank told Hank, from now on don't do me any more favors. I wish I could remember more stories in detail, some lack accuracy so I don't want to tell them until I get them straight.

My dad was pleased when Hank had him host the alumni parties after road games. He said Hank wanted the parties in my dads room and he soon found out why. Hank could go back to his room and sleep and my dad would be up with the partiers all night long and he got the cleanup duty. He enjoyed every minute of it.

My dad thought the world of Hank Anderson and Frank Burgess. He thought of Frank as a shining example of what a Gonzaga student-athlete could become.

I finally got to meet Mr. Burgess in March of 2008 at the WCC championships at USD. It was a real thrill to hear Frank tell the exact same stories my dad had told for all those years. My dad wasn't full of hot air afterall. My dad took a picture of Frank and I, had it enlarged, signed by Frank then gave it to me as a gift. My dad would pass away several months later and that picture means more to me now than ever. I have it with me every GU game I watch on TV and I don't miss a game although I miss having my dad by my side cheering the Zags and yelling at the refs. I am so grateful I finally got to meet Frank while my dad was still alive. :)