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jayray
03-28-2007, 12:21 PM
What could this mean??

http://www.krem.com/

lothar98zag
03-28-2007, 12:23 PM
Probably a new contract...

http://www.spokesmanreview.com/blogs/wsu/

jayray
03-28-2007, 12:27 PM
Next thing you know they are going to have a news conference everytime he ties his shoes. They need a press conference for a new contract?

Asotin
03-28-2007, 01:19 PM
7 year extension is the word on the street. If true that is huge for WSU and very worthy of a news conference.

wazZag
03-28-2007, 01:31 PM
With the state the WSU program has been in, this news is press conference worthy.

TuckC
03-28-2007, 01:47 PM
Agreed. Seeing as there has been much speculation on him going back to the Midwest, it is needed for there to be a press conference. UDUBB has done it. I think the two state schools are doing this because of the many boosters and the fact they are in a big time conference. If this were in the Big 10, I am sure there would be a press conference if Tony tied his shoes.

ZagMania
03-28-2007, 02:38 PM
This wouldn't necessarily prevent him from taking another job, would it? With a contract that long would another school have to buyout the rest of his contract, effectively making him too expensive for another program to consider?

cougs4ever
03-28-2007, 04:11 PM
This wouldn't necessarily prevent him from taking another job, would it? With a contract that long would another school have to buyout the rest of his contract, effectively making him too expensive for another program to consider?

They didn't release details, but that is the speculation, that there is a big buyout in it.

Another reason for the press conference, and timing especially, was to let any potential suitors at the Final Four know that he is off the market.

ZagMania
03-28-2007, 04:21 PM
They didn't release details, but that is the speculation, that there is a big buyout in it.

Another reason for the press conference, and timing especially, was to let any potential suitors at the Final Four know that he is off the market.

Makes sense, thanks.

SteeleMan
03-28-2007, 07:09 PM
:) nicely done by Sterk and WSU. :D

ZagNut08
03-28-2007, 11:24 PM
this is good for us if he can keep his teams playing at a high level. We saw the downsides of having to travel across the country to get a big game. It wouldbe great if we could get a top 50 team every year with only an hour bus ride...not to mention a good game at home every other year

cougs4ever
03-28-2007, 11:42 PM
With the UWe dropping the Zags, because the UWe can't win, maybe GU-WSU can become the marquee college basketball game in December! How cool would that be??!!? I don't know the Cougs' complete non-conference schedule, but the Zags game has to be at the top.

Who needs the west-siders, anyways?

Nevtelen
03-28-2007, 11:52 PM
That wouldn't be much of a stretch as long as they stay good. I'd like for a game at the Arena or another neutral site, though, like it has been, rather than a home-and-home since we're so close.

cougs4ever
03-29-2007, 07:41 AM
That wouldn't be much of a stretch as long as they stay good. I'd like for a game at the Arena or another neutral site, though, like it has been, rather than a home-and-home since we're so close.

This would be a great game for the Arena. Although, I'm sure the EWU-GU game will return there next season, and remain there. Unless the NCAAs are in the Arena, there really isn't a limit on the number of game Gonzaga can play there, just a lot of season-ticket holders to explain it to.

Lawdog9902
03-29-2007, 09:39 AM
I'd love to see this happen. Since UDUB would rather play Nichols State and any multiple directional school it can find, it would be great to see the WSU and GU game get some national exposure. A late November Saturday game at the Arena would be the way to do it, with hopefully either CBS or ABC broadcasting it. With the success of the Cougs this year, coupled with the fact that both teams should be top 25 worthy next year, now is the time to strike. In light of both schools recent record against UDUB, this should be billed as the battle for state supremacy in college hoops.

Asotin
03-29-2007, 09:53 AM
I would be seriously pissed off if WSU and GU changed the series from being home and home to being at the arena. The atmosphere at the arena cannot even come close to touching the atmosphere the last two years, at GU and at WSU, for these games. I attended those games (heck I could throw the year before that at pullman in also, it was a fun atmosphere) and both were alot of fun. The student sections and the alums got into both of those games.

What exactly would the arena bring to this equation? I know the players don't like playing there. It doesn't seat more than Beasly and it isn't nicer than the mac.

ZaggyStardust
03-29-2007, 10:03 AM
I think it would be absolutely great if somehow, ESPN decided to pick up this game next year! Now wouldn't that just curl Romar's toes! Talk about National exposure! Oh, forgot, can't get any of that playing the Zags!!!!!!

cougs4ever
03-29-2007, 12:48 PM
What exactly would the arena bring to this equation? I know the players don't like playing there. It doesn't seat more than Beasly and it isn't nicer than the mac.

More seats than K2.

I like having the vocal student sections at each venue. I don't know if having a "neutral" site would be a selling point to the coaches or not.

Asotin
03-29-2007, 12:56 PM
More seats than K2 but Gu would have to split the gate with WSU. The only party that would benefit would be the casual fans who won't drive all the way to Pulman or can't get into K2.

Lawdog9902
03-29-2007, 03:12 PM
I'd buy tickets and drive from Seattle to see this game in the Arena next year. I normally see 3 or 4 GU games a year live, all road games or neutral sites because I've been unable to get K2 tix. I love the Arena games because it allows the die hard fans, like myself (and others who live out of town) who don't have season tix, the opportunity to see them live in Spokane. If done right this could be a great opportunity for both school to get additional national exposure.

Asotin
03-29-2007, 03:40 PM
I see where you are coming from, but as a loyal season ticket holder moving this game would screw me over. The price of my season tickets wouldn't go down, but a quality game would be removed from my season ticket package. Also if ESPN wanted to pick this game up each year, venue wouldn't matter.

Bocco
03-29-2007, 04:38 PM
I think it would be absolutely great if somehow, ESPN decided to pick up this game next year! Now wouldn't that just curl Romar's toes! Talk about National exposure! Oh, forgot, can't get any of that playing the Zags!!!!!!

To heck with ESPN, better yet how about CBS picking it up on a national broadcast?

cougs4ever
03-30-2007, 12:46 PM
OK all you with great marketing minds, time to use your wits. What would be a good name for this rivalry? What can we call eastern Washington hoops? Something like Tobacco Road in Carolina?


Off the top of my head:

The Spokane Challenge
Inland Empire Throw Down
The Battle for Washington
Palouse Road Rumble


Obviously, I am an accountant with little creative skills here. :o

sonuvazag
03-30-2007, 12:56 PM
War over Wheat Fields

a13coach
03-30-2007, 12:57 PM
Obviously, I am an accountant with little creative skills here. :o

Aren't you being redundant? :D

lothar98zag
03-30-2007, 01:00 PM
Maybe rhyme something w/ Palouse?

:confused:

sonuvazag
03-30-2007, 01:42 PM
taken from www.rhymezone.com

Words and phrases that rhyme with goose: (115 results)

1 syllable:
boose, bruce, cheuse, coos, cruce, deuce, deuss, doose, druce, duce, foose, fuoss, hoose, juice, loose, luce, moose, mousse, noose, preuss, pruess, reuss, ruess, seuss, sluice, spruce, truce, tyus, use, zeus

2 syllables:
abstruse, abuse, asmus, black spruce, break loose, caboose, damoose, deduce, derousse, diffuse, disuse, ekeus, excuse, fish mousse, fruit juice, grape juice, hair mousse, il duce, induce, in use, labouisse, lajous, let loose, lime juice, misuse, obtuse, produce, profuse, recluse, reduce, red spruce, reuse, seduce, slip noose, vanhoose, white spruce

3 syllables:
apple juice, brewer's spruce, cancer juice, carrot juice, chicken mousse, child abuse, chocolate mousse, disabuse, douglas spruce, drug abuse, eastern spruce, flag of truce, gastric juice, genus zeus, grapefruit juice, introduce, lemon juice, norway spruce, on the loose, orange juice, out of use, reproduce, running noose, silver spruce, weeping spruce, yellow spruce

4 syllables:
carnal abuse, context of use, cranberry juice, digestive juice, drug of abuse, engelmann spruce, overproduce, papaya juice, pineapple juice, reintroduce, robert the bruce, substance abuse, tobacco juice, tomato juice

5 syllables:
alcohol abuse, colorado spruce, frozen orange juice, oriental spruce, pancreatic juice, siberian spruce

6 syllables:
alcoholic abuse, colorado blue spruce

7 syllables:
alcoholism abuse

Nevtelen
03-30-2007, 02:30 PM
Frozen orange juice! That's it! Palouse Frozen Oranje Juice! Brilliant! :)

Or not. All the good names are taken, some of them probably several times over. I always liked the Backyard Brawl. It needs to be something evocative like that. Hmmm...

Nevtelen
03-31-2007, 10:44 AM
We could call it the Annual Butt Kicking... oh, wait - that would be if we still played the Huskies. My bad. :D

gamagin
04-02-2007, 11:34 AM
<<Bocco wrote: Don't think Boyle Fuel exists any more, but The Red Lion Hotels and could be added to the list. >>

extinct GU area businesses/institutions . . .

The Boyle Fuel, Colonial Bowl, Irish Dutch Inn, Fallons, Addison Food Shop, Winkler Broom, Tonani's Hardware, Univeristy Pharmacy, Joey's, Joe & Morrie's IGA, Dairy Freeze, O'Neill's, Barstone Fuel, E.C. Olsen, Daley Burger, The Chef, Philips 66, Holy Names Academy, Gonzaga High School, McGoldrick's, Old Man Paul, Fr. deSmet annual WSU-GU basketball game and nostalgia fest.

ZagNative
04-02-2007, 12:03 PM
<<Bocco wrote: Don't think Boyle Fuel exists any more, but The Red Lion Hotels and could be added to the list. >>

extinct GU area businesses/institutions . . .

The Boyle Fuel, Colonial Bowl, Irish Dutch Inn, Fallons, Addison Food Shop, Winkler Broom, Tonani's Hardware, Univeristy Pharmacy, Joey's, Joe & Morrie's IGA, Dairy Freeze, O'Neill's, Barstone Fuel, E.C. Olsen, Daley Burger, The Chef, Philips 66, Holy Names Academy, Gonzaga High School, McGoldrick's, Old Man Paul, Fr. deSmet annual WSU-GU basketball game and nostalgia fest.


Addison Food Market? The Daily Burger? Good grief man, how are you still alive? I thought I was the only one on this board old enough to remember these establishments!!! And "Irish Dutch Inn?" Where was this? I'm thinking of Dutch's Blue & White, the fountain/restaurant in a house near the Ad building. Is O'Neil's the old Bernie's Tavern at Mission and Hamilton? The Chef, of course, had honorable lineage going back to the original Twenty-Four Flavors ...

gamagin
04-02-2007, 12:24 PM
<< Addison Food Market? The Daily Burger? Good grief man, how are you still alive? I thought I was the only one on this board old enough to remember these establishments!!! And "Irish Dutch Inn?" Where was this? I'm thinking of Dutch's Blue & White, the fountain/restaurant in a house near the Ad building. Is O'Neil's the old Bernie's Tavern at Mission and Hamilton? The Chef, of course, had honorable lineage going back to the original Twenty-Four Flavors ...>>


I forgot the old five and dime (mission & Hamilton b4 the old safeway moved in), ernies (gas station @ nw corner mission and hamilton); frankie augusts (joey's brother-- where geno's is), the barber shop (same place a few feet south and now part of geno's parking lot), the Norge village/Kinko's, Manlowe Transfer (later United Buckingham & now ezloader trailer), taylor Edwards (now the warehouse).

But to your question, Dutch and mae ryan's place had many names, I blv the original was the Irish Dutch inn, later to be known as the blue and white and also Dutch's. The 24 flavors opened, as, if I recall correctly, a donut shop. the doughnut operators decided they could make more money on drugs, so it then became 24 flavors (that or the other way around). Daley burger was many things before, too, but the earliest one I remember was Peter Potter's (a restaurant run by an alcoholic by that name). I worked at both dutch's and Potters, as well as the Dairy Freeze (opened by Frank Almond, then run by Mike Aquino, then ray Martire and finally Frank Martire before it became Arnie's). I'm sure I've left some out. Like the trolley. But I never saw the trolley, just the tracks.

best regards,

Angelo Roncalli
04-02-2007, 12:29 PM
For every heating problem,
Be your furnace old or new,
Just call the Boyle Fuel Company,
And we'll solve them all for you.
Fairfax 8-1521!
Fairfax 8-1521!

Two of the Sontgerath sisters live in my neighborhood in Seattle. Every time we have a neighborhood party or get together, we join arms and sing the anthem of our youth.

Other gone-but-not-forgotten-businesses (many of which appear under earlier names above):

One Hour Martinizing (One Hour Mutilating--beat into flour in just one hour)
Dr. Gordon Windle and Dr. Frank Morton's offices
Forum Tavern
Pakies
Taco Mejico (Toxic Mejico)
Chad'sFoodsChad'sFoodsChad'sFoodsChad'sFoods
The Butcher of Hamilton (one chair barbershop--can't remember the proprietor's name)

gamagin
04-02-2007, 12:58 PM
when you need coal or OILLLLLLLLLL
CaLLLLLL BOYLLLLLLe

fairfax 5-1521 . . . fairfax 5-1521

and now (your host for starlit stairway) . . . . TED OTTO ! ! !


--

re: One Hour Martinizing (One Hour Mutilating--beat into flour in just one hour)
Dr. Gordon Wendle and Dr. Frank Morton's offices (and Dr. Nishimura) + couple of dentists (Dill?)

Forum Tavern (Originally Bernies, consisted of three old streetcars cobbled together)

Pakies (originally Fallons, across from Dutch's which later became the GU post office)

Taco Mejico (Toxic Mejico) -- formerly another gas station.

Chad'sFoodsChad'sFoodsChad'sFoodsChad'sFoods - (the old IGA, now starbucks & a bagle shop)

The Butcher of Hamilton (one chair barbershop--can't remember the proprietor's name). the difference between and good and a bad haircut -- 3 days.

--

University Pharmacy - Bill Stevens, proprietor, druggist, RIP, (now part of Joey's/Jack & Dan's)

hondo
04-02-2007, 01:11 PM
And of course Lou's Snappy Service

gamagin
04-02-2007, 01:44 PM
<< wrote : And of course Lou's Snappy Service >>

lou tonani ?

saintzag
04-02-2007, 01:45 PM
Hank the barber. Next to Mays.

gamagin
04-02-2007, 02:07 PM
<< Hank the barber. Next to Mays. >>

Zappone Industries (w. of GU Music Bldg); the original Bulldog Tavern (now Pete's Pizza.

Trivia: the current Bulldog Tav. is made up of 2 sections of the old WW II barracks that used to be Gonzaga High School (which was located roughly where Welch Hall now stands on campus). that small building next to it (clothing store or candle shop or whatever) is also a portion of the old GHS.

Birddog
04-02-2007, 02:14 PM
Pretty accurate so far. Here are some correction/additions.
The Chef started out in life as Johnson's 24 Flavors, an ice cream shop. The elder Johnsons lived in the back, and the son pretty much ran the biz. It lasted only 2 or maybe 3 years. The 2nd opening it was a donut shop and frequented by motorcyclcists. I think maybe the "drug" thing was urban legend, but I can't say for sure. The rumor swirled because of the Harley jockeys. The 3rd life of the blg was when it became a Spudnut (out of SLC) franchise run by 2 guys. One was named Cecil, and he drove us neighborhood kids around and we sold fresh Spudnuts door to door. Finally Vince Piccolo opened it up as the Chef 2, later it became the only store. His other one was on the fringe of downtown I think.

Before it was One Hour Martinizing, it was a Phillips 66 service station. When they opened up OHM, it was .05 a shirt to be laundered and pressed. There were several dry cleaners in the area, one was either next door to the Dalyburger, or in the same location, which was across Hamilton from the Marshall Wells Hardware Store, which I think was Tonani's.
Dr Nishimura also practiced in the same bldg where Wendle et al were.

Bill Stevens was a commanding figure up on the pharmacist stage at the back of the store. His mother was also in the store every day. Remember the sort of wild looking redhead that worked there? She always had big earrings, and at Christmas she would wear small Christmas ornaments as same.
The Bulldog was originally in a ramshackle two story blgd, just W of and adjacent to it's present location. When it was in it's original location, practically no students went in there. There was living quarters upstairs. How can you guys forget the mainstay bartender there? her name was Minnie. The old Bulldog bldg was rented by many after that. It was a small arcade with Skiball machines for awhile, then a place where you could get E Texas/Louisiana style BBQ and jerky. Last thing I remember in there was Custom Duck Leather Co, during the hippie era.

I'm pretty sure the Barber next to August's Resaurant was named Bill, he played the banjo in small dixieland bands too. There was also a barber located in the front part of the 1st house E of the old Safeway. He was there for 2 or 3 years until he got busted for molesting young boys. That one shocked a few people.

Safeway was originally on the SE corner of Mission and Hamilton. It was actually pretty neat. It had the sawdust on the wooden floors. When they expanded, they bought the 5 & 10 next door (Sprouse Reitz) and doubled their size. The 2 mainstay cashiers were Katie and Barnie. I'll never forget the look on Katie's face the first time I was legal and came up to the counter with a case of beer.

Bernies was owned by Bernie O'neil and was the name most remembered for the tavern made out of 3 street cars on Hamilton just S of Mission. It was originally called the Mission Gardens. After Bernies, it was the Forum, I believe Jack Raney had an interest in it. The dry cleaners on the SW corner was originally a tiny Chevron Station operated for several years by Harry Frazier, Greg's dad. They put the DC operation into the mechanics part of the place.

I loved the Addison Grocery. It was another tiny place, right on the alley between Mission and Augusta, W side of the street. I think the name of the lady that ran it was Kerry, she was sweet. We would go there to buy candy at lunch time from St Al's. She too was always accompanied by her mother. Either her ex husband or her father was an FBI man, or so she said.

There was a house located where the Norge ended up. It had been for sale for years, and finally Ray Martire bought it after he started running the Freeze, Within about a year, the Norge people came in and leased the place from him and built the laundromat DC.

Th place you call Earnies, had to be the old Shell Service Station. There was another self service DC and laundromat at Augusta and Hamilton, NW corner. Don't have any idea what's there now, but there was yet another service station at Sharp and Hamilton NE corner.

EC Olson Lumberyard was also known as Diamond National and , oh crap, the original name escapes me just now. You also forgot that Riblett Tramway was located down there by EZ Loader before it moved up Hamilton to where it curves into Nevada

OK, my brain is fried.

Birddog

PS The original singers for Leon Boyle were the Sylte Sisters. Anybody besides me remember "Mr Engineer and Mr Pufferbelly"? How about "daddy Addy Bobkins"? OK, I know you'll remember "Lucky Larry Lujack"

gamagin
04-02-2007, 02:38 PM
<< After Bernies, it was the Forum, I believe Jack Raney had an interest in it. >>

Frank Raney (Jack's bro) & Don McNall, both GU-G prep grads owned it as the Forum. Just to try and get "some" basketball in here, Frank's georgous daughter is Blake Stepp's girlfriend.

<< The place you call Ernies, had to be the old Shell Service Station.>>

yup. Mike Davis wound up with it. It's now a car wash.

<< EC Olson Lumberyard was also known as Diamond National and , oh crap, the original name escapes me just now.>>

Mcgoldrick's it was at the turn of the century.

<< Don't have any idea what's there now, but there was yet another service station at Sharp and Hamilton NE corner.>>

Hi Co service station and stuff (like 7-11)

sittingon50
04-02-2007, 03:05 PM
I got drafted in the early 70's & sent to SoCal. Another guy @ my camp was from Kalispell; he had also grown up watching TV out of Spokane. We got many an "interested" look when we broke out the Boyle Fuel Song in unison.:clap:

hondo
04-02-2007, 03:49 PM
when gamagin wrote
"Mcgoldrick's it was at the turn of the century."
It was that other century.

Yes it was Lou Tanani's place and boys from 630 E. Sharp did their best to keep him in business.

ZagNative
04-02-2007, 04:01 PM
I waited tables (badly) at Johnson's Twenty-Four Flavors. At the time, Frank Burgess and Jean Claude Lefabvre played hoops for the Zags. I don't recall them ever coming into the restaurant, though I would often see Jean Claude towering above the congregation at Sunday Mass at St. Al's.

"Eleanor" was a frequent customer at Twenty-Four Flavors. Hard to describe Eleanor, but those of a certain age may recall that interesting lady who lived her life in the Gonzaga neighborhood as a perpetual teenager. She, too, is one of those landmark institutions that eventually disappeared from view.

gamagin
04-02-2007, 04:06 PM
re: mcgoldricks. Of course, that was turn of the 18th century.

Re Lou tonani's: arguably the best screws in town. now home of the best pizza: David's (at least the back room)

Birddog
04-02-2007, 04:07 PM
"Eleanor"
Wow, a blast form the past. I think Eleanor (who was obviously "challenged") worked for the nuns (Sister of Charity and Providence) over at St Joseph's Old Folks Home, in the kitchen IIRC. So if you remember her, then you must remember "Alaska Jack", who was quite the dapper character.

Birddog

Birddog
04-02-2007, 04:13 PM
This thread has been hijacked a couple times already, but to answer one of the secondary questions,
OK all you with great marketing minds, time to use your wits. What would be a good name for this rivalry? What can we call eastern Washington hoops? Something like Tobacco Road in Carolina?
How about the "Grain Elevator Grudge Match"

Birddog

PS
Someone needs to transfer all this local history over to "May's Blue and White".

hondo
04-02-2007, 04:20 PM
Someone needs to transfer all this local history over to "May's Blue and White".

Someone needs to write a book because that was the most interesting neighborhood this side of Middlearth. Maybe that was Middlearth.

Bocco
04-02-2007, 04:22 PM
extinct GU area businesses/institutions . . .

The Boyle Fuel, Colonial Bowl, Irish Dutch Inn, Fallons, Addison Food Shop, Winkler Broom, Tonani's Hardware, Univeristy Pharmacy, Joey's, Joe & Morrie's IGA, Dairy Freeze, O'Neill's, Barstone Fuel, E.C. Olsen, Daley Burger, The Chef, Philips 66, Holy Names Academy, Gonzaga High School, McGoldrick's, Old Man Paul, Fr. deSmet annual WSU-GU basketball game and nostalgia fest.

Don't forget The Pine Shed on Division (what a dump but cheap drinks), Packy's (next to Rebmon now a perking lot), Bubble Inn, and the Windmill Tavern on Trent.

ZagNative
04-02-2007, 04:31 PM
Birddog is my childhood alter ego, though we've never met, so many memories do we share of the unique neighborhood in which we grew up.

Yes, indeed, I do remember Alaska Jack. Were Alaska Jack alive today, I suspect he'd be on one of those posters of suspicious characters to watch out for in your neighborhood.

Logan neighborhood, indeed. Whose brilliant idea was that? To apply a generic, on-the-fringe name to a neighborhood that was so overwhelmingly Catholic, so overwhelmingly St. Al's and Gonzaga?

It was (and remains) a unique niche in Spokane and a great place to grow up.

Gonzaga University has been the glue that's held it together and helped it retain and develop its unique character, especially in recent years.

gamagin
04-02-2007, 04:39 PM
alaska jack (source of all my jacknives)
eleanor, about the size of a jockey and a sweet, fragile lady
Bucky, the giraffe-like spastic who tried very hard to fit in and be treated as normal, and failed
Old Man Paul, who lived in a shack down by the river near the east end of the centennial bridge where it tapers back to the ground over Hamilton street. Paul used to get roaring drunk and goose-step around the neighborhood shouting orders, or perhaps instructions, to himself, in Polish
Pa John, who built additions on, around and above his home on north Cinncinatti, until he fell off one of his additions one day
boner, who taught me to smoke and drink
John, my deaf friend, who taught me to read lips. & steal.
Joe and Morrie, who taught me the consequences of stealing
mom, who taught me the consequences of smoking and drinking and stealing.
Fr. Michael O'malley, who said "very good" after each visit to his confessional. repeatedly.
My bros, who taught me how to hop trains, park cars in neighborhood yards and keep the fees and take a punch.

Hats off. Bottoms up. And thanks for the memories.

kjstoph1
04-03-2007, 05:08 AM
[QUOTE=gamagin;18658]when you need coal or OILLLLLLLLLL
CaLLLLLL BOYLLLLLLe

fairfax 5-1521 . . . fairfax 5-1521

and now (your host for starlit stairway) . . . . TED OTTO ! ! !


--

Banner Fuel > Boyle.

Clary Wright > Ted Otto

Good Old Smilin' Sylvan > anything.

Birddog
04-03-2007, 07:04 AM
Do I have this right.....................

Ban-ner Fuel, Ban-ner Fuel,
N 625 Helenahhh, Ban-ner Fuel

Gamain and I have traded PM's and we seem to have a minor disagreement on the Bulldog's origins. I say it was built from the barracks that were located on the N side of Webster school. My belief of same is partly based on the fact that the bldgs were a sort of cream/tan color for years as they were unoccupied till the Bulldog moved. I seem to remember Gonzaga HS bldgs as painted blue, but of course I could be totally wrong.

Not mentioned so far is the shoe repair shop that was located immediately N of the Phillips 66 (Davids Pizza). It was operated by Mr Van Schoorl, a neighbor of ours, and one of the semi-rare non-catholics in the neighborhood. He always had a dog turd (cigar)in his mouth and walked to work daily. One of Jhoops relatives took it over when he retired and moved. The Hardware Store was the next bldg to the N from there.

I've tried to verify the Barber's name, and my brother does not think it was Bill and he played Trumpet not Banjo.

On the NW corner of Sinto and Hamilton there stood a large apartment house that had atleast 5 two story w/ basement flats. One basement was converted into another apt. It was torn down (mid 60's) to make way for American Commercial Bank

Before the restaurant known as August's(Geno's) was there, it had a few lives as other cafe types commonly called "greasy spoons". It was a simple cafe hamburger/shake place prior to going Italian with Frank August (who sold out and moved to Las Vegas when Vegas had a pop. of about 65,000). The operators that I remember last (before August) were named Sponsler, and they opened up a place near Logan school on Hamilton after moving I think the new place was called the Sweet Shop or something like that. Frankie operated in only half the bldg initially, but business blossomed and he took over the N half as well. My brother painted the three Italian scene murals on the wall back in about '63. The glue to that place was Giuseppi Cuozzo, the chef. He worked there for many years under different owners. A weekly ritual was when Mr Cassano of Cassano's Grocery would arrive with the weeks pasta and those two would bargain (argue) in Italian until a deal was struck. I remember Mr Cassano driving up in a Model "A" pickup when I was real little.

Don't forget "Tomorrow" Furniture at the NE corner of Sinto and Division just across from Zips home of the "Papa Joe Special". It was in an old Safeway bldg and featured very modern furniture. North Bowl was just across Division on Sinto.

Where was the Cathay Inn, was it the chinese place on Division between Boone and Sharp or maybe Sharp and Sinto? There was also a Western Wear shop on one of those corners in a place that previously had been a frozen food locker, I believe called Penguin Lockers. You youngun's prolly have no idea what that was.

Bucky Buckmaster, the Giraffe like fellow Gamagin mentioned rode around the neighborhood on a massive Schwinn type bicycle. Another fixture, at least in my mind was Joe Metcalf who lived next door to Gamagin if I'm not mistaken. He was wheel chair bound and attended GU for a long time, finally graduating when I was there, maybe even in my class, I'm not sure.

The Pine Shed had a lot of notoriety, most not all that wholesome. The Spokane Flyers, Comets, Jets hung out there and there was a lot of infidelity practiced, although in fairness,it wasn't limited to hockey players. One time before going in there, I was advised to wear a wedding ring If I wanted to even have a chance at getting lucky ( I was single).

Some other memory joggers. The White Elephant, NW Seed and Insecticide, The 2 Swabbies, Moler Barber College, Dr Cowan's Peerless Painless Dentistry, The Old Crow Tavern, The El Rey Theater, Hayhead Ray, F.O. Berg Tent and Awning. OK, my minds numb again.

Birddog

gamagin
04-03-2007, 08:27 AM
<< Not mentioned so far is the shoe repair shop that was located immediately N of the Phillips 66 (Davids Pizza). It was operated by Mr Van Schoorl, a neighbor of ours, and one of the semi-rare non-catholics in the neighborhood.>>

I mentioned the shoe shop as Winkler's Broom's. Mr. Winkler was a blind former dynamite salesman who was blinded by his product. He used to make brooms, really good brooms, in the shop after Mr. Van Schoorl left.

the knock on him was he overcharged for his product(s). but frankly, one of his brooms would likely still be in service today, they were so good. The real problem was our parents were too cheap or too poor, to pay for quality. Probably the latter.

Mr. Winkler always had a professional baseball game playing on the radio in his shop. He could cite statistics until dark. and argue baseball. His kids took him to games and could be seen describing every pitch. He remembered every one of them.

He had that stevie wonder-ray charles look to him, his blind eyes seemingly looking off in the distance, and upward. his ears were laser-like & cocked for the slightest sound. He could recognize people by their "sound."

"Good morning, Jerry," he once said as I merely walked by his narrow, open front door, on my way to the IGA. I coudn't believe it. He could probably hear me stealing a pack of walnettos.

I remember the smells in the shoe shop like it was yesterday, too. a mixture of high alcohol content boot grease or polish and cigar smoke. an instant hit produced an instant buzz. He should have bottled that smell.

More fun than hanging around the leaded gas pump (lead free was not an option) on a good spring day. Or savoring a walnetto.

Birddog
04-03-2007, 08:42 AM
Interesting, I don't remember his shop when it was there, but I do remember when it was located up near Illinois and Hamilton.

Birddog

gamagin
04-03-2007, 11:25 AM
wrote re winkler broom< Interesting, I don't remember his shop when it was there, but I do remember when it was located up near Illinois and Hamilton.>


speaking of Illinois near hamilton, what about shorty's barber shop ? shorty bronowski (sp?) and what, a dozen kids ? Nice family.

Dogtownkid
04-03-2007, 01:50 PM
I'm really impressed with how well you remember so many of the old neighborhood! I suspect some of you are even older than I am, if such a thing is possible. Of course, I lived in the area only from 1950 to 1960, when I started roaming the world. One place no one has mentioned. There used to be a little grocery store run by a guy named Rooney--about where that cake shop is now. I believe Zagnative's criminal career began and ended in that store.

ZagNative
04-03-2007, 02:01 PM
Hah! I'm so glad I wasn't the one who added that one toothpick too many to the pyramid and got this tread booted from the bball forum! What a relief! The pressure is off.

So many great memories here.


Before the restaurant known as August's(Geno's) was there, it had a few lives as other cafe types commonly called "greasy spoons". It was a simple cafe hamburger/shake place prior to going Italian with Frank August (who sold out and moved to Las Vegas when Vegas had a pop. of about 65,000).

My favorite proprietors in this building were Homer and Gladys, who I think ran the place just before or after Frankie August did. One day the nuns at HNA sent me home with a really bad cold, and, of course, I stopped for a coke. Homer and Gladys wouldn't let me leave until they'd fed me a complimentary bowl of chicken soup.

A big throng of us used to thunder over after school for a smoke and a coke (all the HNA girls smoked, though most tried to keep the fact secret from outsiders). Homer would get so riled by all the commotion and his hands would shake so much the change he'd try to make would jingle out of his hands and go rolling across the table, and he'd sometimes snap at us, though his heart was obviously golden.

Another gone but not forgotten establishment in the neighborhood, Pal's fountain/cafe on the corner of Ermina and Hamilton. And The Cottage, the little blue building which seemed to cater mostly to truckers and working types, on the west side of Hamilton between Indiana and Baldwin.

I found out belatedly that the GU/St. Al's neighborhood did have its class distinctions. I was "North of Mission," while the pillars of the community were generally "South of Mission."



The Pine Shed had a lot of notoriety, most not all that wholesome. The Spokane Flyers, Comets, Jets hung out there and there was a lot of infidelity practiced, although in fairness,it wasn't limited to hockey players. One time before going in there, I was advised to wear a wedding ring If I wanted to even have a chance at getting lucky ( I was single).

Boy, Birddog, I think you may have dodged a bullet here if your hunting forays were unrewarded. Marriage at 20 kept me out of the meat markets for most of my life, but I had a friend who went on a tear after her divorce from a rather repressive minister guy, and one of the tales she told was of bringing home a "date" she met at the Pineshed and announcing to him, before any serious "romancing" started, "This better be good, or your name is going ... to ... be ... all ... over .... town !!!" I don't think you would have needed that kind of pressure ...

I feel sorry for young people in Spokane these days. I guess SIN is where you find it, but in earlier days, one knew where it could be found consistently.

Though the Red Lion is still there, at the corner of Main and Division, it's not the same old Red Lion, with its collection of hookers and cops and lawyers and bums and artists and musicians and drug dealers and intellectuals, black folks, and white folks, and native americans, in short, a melting ### of all classes and races of Spokane society, and what a great place to hear great rhythm and blues in a small, jammed environment.

Edited to add: Too funny you can't say "melting p0t" here!

Bocco
04-03-2007, 09:58 PM
The Pine Shed had a lot of notoriety, most not all that wholesome. The Spokane Flyers, Comets, Jets hung out there and there was a lot of infidelity practiced, although in fairness,it wasn't limited to hockey players. One time before going in there, I was advised to wear a wedding ring If I wanted to even have a chance at getting lucky ( I was single).
Birddog

The Pine Shed was an interesting dump. Used to stop in there with a couple of Jebbies who taught at GU (they also weren't that particular about id's). A lot of lonely people looking for some company for the evening. Suspect a few of them were selling their company. Seems to me there was a motel next day that rented by the hour. You mentioned the El Ray - had to make a visit there freshman year. Once was enough. Only thing I remember there were six GU freshmen there and a whole lot of middle aged bald headed men. Birddog and I also traded pm's about the Bubble Inn run by Mary Glass, great little hole in the wall on Division. I think Mary knew the name of eveyone who came in. Then there was Ida and Norma selling curtains and window coverings. I think they were at Montgomery Wards and then in the 80's or so started theri own business.

jhoop
04-03-2007, 11:41 PM
By Birddog:
"Not mentioned so far is the shoe repair shop that was located immediately N of the Phillips 66 (Davids Pizza). It was operated by Mr Van Schoorl, a neighbor of ours, and one of the semi-rare non-catholics in the neighborhood. He always had a dog turd (cigar)in his mouth and walked to work daily. One of Jhoops relatives took it over when he retired and moved. The Hardware Store was the next bldg to the N from there"

Close Bird, but no cigar. A guy named Angelo (we called him Ange) took the place over from Van Schoorl. My connection is that he was a pal of my uncle who operated the Chevron station on the northeast corner of Hamilton and Baldwin. My uncle also ran a little book out of the back of the gas station and Ange was a customer. As a teenager, I ran bets back and forth between the station and Ange's shoe shop, stopping off to pick up Geno Orlando's (Geno's) business too, among a few others. Some of these guys were real characters and it was an experience I wouldn't trade for anything.

I'm glad someone mentioned the Bubble Inn. John and Mary Glass were wonderful people who treated the GU students well. She let a few of us run a tab and we'd go in every Friday an settle up and that included a couple of "schooners" on Mary. Two friends and I vistited Mary a couple of weeks before she died and we had a grand time talking about the carefree days at the Bubble. Dime beer night on Wednesdays was packed every week.

This is a terrific thread and I'm going to save it as a reference to the area with the misnomer of Logan Neighborhood. I sent an e-mail to the city last year suggesting that the name should be changed to the Gonzaga Neighborhood, mainly to capitalize on the national recognition of the name. General Logan was a Civil War vet who I doubt ever set foot in Spokane. The guy at the city forwarded my missive to the Logan Neighborhood Steering Committee and a couple of their finest responded by telling me that the originating committee did not want any inference that the neighborhood was only Catholic. One of them wrote that she was concerned that any possible future scandals invovling Gonzaga could refelct negatively on the neighborhood. Honest, she really wrote that. I politely bowed out and responded that I really didn't mean to start a religious war and that my motives were purely based on PR considerations. I think Gonzaga may be just a little bit more nationally recognized than the obscure name of Logan.

Birddog
04-04-2007, 06:20 AM
Well crap, Hoopster, since you were both Italian, I just figured you were related.

I think Gonzaga may be just a little bit more nationally recognized than the obscure name of Logan.
Maybe we could get the head honch moderator to change the settings so that anytime "L O G A N" was spelled it magically became "G O N Z A G A", sort of lie how P O T becomes ***.
Just a thought, and a small step in reviving the proper name to the area. THAT PART OF SPOKANE WAS NEVER, EVER KNOWN AS THE &*%$@ NEIGHBORHOOD!!!!!!!!!!


There used to be a little grocery store run by a guy named Rooney--about where that cake shop is now. DogTown for those of us who no longer live in Spokane, where the hell is the cake shop? A location would help jog the memory of the place you mention. BTW, am I to assume you are from Hillyard re your handle? If that's the case, are you old enough to remember "Hillyard Hijinks"?

Native, could the "Homer and Gladys" have been named Stone? I believe right near the end of that place's existence as a greasy spoon, the Stone's ran it. They had a son about 5 or 6 years older than I and lived somewhere nearby. It seems like most folks only ran that place for a year or so until Frankie took it over. BTW, that place has been an Italian restaurant since Frankie August took it over. I'm pretty sure that Butch Smulan was the owner after Frank August sold it and moved, after him I don't know. Butch had a younger brother about your age, maybe a bit younger.

Birddog

gamagin
04-04-2007, 07:34 AM
and utensil & cookie cutter shop is on the northwest corner of augusta & hamilton.

schmulen's younger bro was wayne schmulan. don't recall stones ever running what used to be august's, but agree it went through a lot of owners before it settled in as geno's.

Does anyone remember bill stevens' cat(s) at the Univesity Pharmacy. He fed them only vitamins. My guess is they feasted on mice when he wasn't around, but Bill swore he only fed them vitamins and they were HUGE. Looked like small dogs. Rich coats and long lives.

FWIW I did see him giving one of them a fist full of pills one day. And the cat loved them.

But like I say, my guess it washed the powder down with a mouse now and again. We all cheat on our diets.

Bocco
04-04-2007, 03:05 PM
My senior year 70-71 our class kind of took over the Bubble Inn on Wednesdays, naturally attracted by the 10 cent beer and if I remember correctly 50 cent pitchers. Some of us used to show up 2-3PM Wednesdays just to stake out a place to sit for the evening, usually we didn't leave until 2AM. Spring semester made sure I didn't have a class till Thursday afternoon since I would have never made it up for class in the morning. Got so crowded a few nitghts thay Mary had stop letting people in, especially after the fire department made a few visits - seems they felt Mary needed to pay a little more attention to the max number of people allowed in the building.

gamagin
04-04-2007, 05:18 PM
"I found out belatedly that the GU/St. Al's neighborhood did have its class distinctions. I was "North of Mission," while the pillars of the community were generally "South of Mission."

--

Would you/could you elaborate ? I will then attempt to give you a glmpse of life among the pillars.

tns & best regards,

Birddog
04-04-2007, 05:44 PM
Would you/could you elaborate ? I will then attempt to give you a glmpse of life among the pillars.
Five minutes have passed since I read that, and I'm still laughing my ass off. Native mentioned this another time and I did some head scratching then. Maybe it has something to do with the proximity of the Spires S. of Mission, and to the dreaded L0$@# N. of Mission. Now N. of Illinois was getting a little sketchy.

Dogtown said
There used to be a little grocery store run by a guy named Rooney--about where that cake shop is now.
Since Gamagin located it for me, I do remember that little store. I think they tore it down to build the Laundromat, unless it was just N of that bldg. I don't think I was in that place more than 10 times, Safeway was closer to us. The few times I was in there it was probably to buy candy.


My guess is they feasted on mice when he wasn't around, but Bill swore he only fed them vitamins and they were HUGE.
I'd guess with a tavern next door, there was no shortage of moving feasts for Bill's cats. Do you remember a kid named Skinner that lived above Joey's for a couple of years. He was an outsider as he went to public school as I recall.

Birddog

gamagin
04-05-2007, 07:05 AM
I would love to hear from our friend Zagnative re N/of/Mission.

re the little store. the bldg still there, the laundromat is north of it, across the alley.

re skinner: yes, Jimmy. His ma and pa used to trip the light fantastic (Thunderbird would be my guess), then get into fist fights, as I recall. She would win.

I think it was the 3 rollers in her hair, day and night, and the incessant pall mall (filterless) hanging from her lips, that kept me at a respectful distance. even though the tattered bathrobe and slippers she wore to the store and to the Drugstore, to Joey's, and all day, every day, had a come hither (and I'll kick your ass) look to it. Many times I wish I could have gotten close enough to close that flappping kimono.

Jimmy was a good kid. Just didn't have a chance.

Birddog
04-06-2007, 04:54 AM
No not that kind of vision, but at least it wasn't that image of Mrs Skinner that Gamagin so accurately painted and that I haven't been able to dislodge from my mind until this supplanted it.

The bldg that now houses the Bulldog stood either empty or housed forgettable businesses until the Bulldog moved from next door. There was one however that actually made a dent for awhile. I believe that in the space that was the Sharp entrance to the Bulldog, there was a Barbershop for time. I think it might have been called Nick's and was operated by an immigrant, possibly a Hungarian. I am recalling that the window was painted up in a red, white and blue sort of patriotic motif, is that right? The sign was what is known in the trade as a "window splash", or almost, it was maybe slightly less bold than a "splash".

Old impressions are sometimes hard to kill. I can't help but think that the Laundromat on the NW corner of Augusta and Hamilton was right on the corner, and the wooden bldg that once was a small grocery was next N abutting the alley. The reason this sticks out in my mind is because after a snowfall we would hang out on Augusta waiting for the cars to leave the Laundromat to "ski jog" up the street. I think maybe a House had stood in the place where the Laundromat is, the Neesers lived there. They had a bunch of kids.

"Ski Jogging", yet another winter sport that gets only passing recognition. I'm betting that if it had ever become an Olympic sport that some from the hood might have made it on the team. I know I was pretty damn good at it. I remember once when a student (probably from California) hauled us up and down Sharp ( this was before Sharp became an arterial and was just a wide residential street) between the tracks and Hamilton at about 50 mph trying to shake us. He thought the bare patches would do us in. Little did he know how slick the bare spots actually were. I remember him finally stopping and asking us how the hell we were able to do it. Conditions like that gave Mr Van Schoorl some extra winter business re-soling our "logger" boots, the standard equipment that any ski jogger worth his salt had. On really good days, a shrimp like me had to fight for bumper space with the older bigger kids and to be successful you had to have a damn good grip and be able to handle the bumping (a boot slide out meant to dislodge you) that occurred and even dish it out. I remember schooling a few college kids every once in awhile in the fine points of "jogging". Another sure fire place to "jog" was on either Baldwin or Indiana (I forget which) catching the cars departing the WWP parking lot and riding the three blocks or so up to Hamilton before running back and hitching another ride. Every year the nuns would lecture us on the dangers of this activity after the first snowfall, although I remember one of them telling us she did it as a kid too. I was impressed.

Birddog

Bocco
04-06-2007, 06:06 AM
Birddog,

Your reminiscing about ski jogging reminded my of another thing long gone cars with real bumpers. '50 and '60s era cars useally gave you plenty of bumper to grab onto. I can remember a lot of ski jogging wehn all the snow fell the winter of '68-69. On more than one occasion a Zag ski joggers caused local Gonzaga Neighborhood residents to stop there cars and lecture the bumper grabbers about the dangers of this activity. I wonder if the bumpers we were grabbing onto were not those of some of the parents of the posters on this thread?

Also long gone from Spokane are the "twin neon" towers of KHQ, and the huge time/temt sign on the Lincol Bldg. I don't remember when they were turn off, it just seems that one day you looked out and there were no longer present.

jhoop
04-06-2007, 05:19 PM
Conditions like that gave Mr Van Schoorl some extra winter business re-soling our "logger" boots, the standard equipment that any ski jogger worth his salt had.\

You just weren't a regular guy unless you had a pair of logger boots. The problem was that many couldn't afford more than one pair of shoes at a time so the logger boots were worn the whole school year. I remember that Dick Gaffney had the coolest pair of logger boots in the school followed closely by Jim Book's and Billy Diedrick's. Birddog had a pair that were in the top 5 which is noteworthy since there were over 800 kids in the 8 grades, half of which were boys.

Birddog
04-06-2007, 05:44 PM
I remember that Dick Gaffney had the coolest pair of logger boots in the school followed closely by Jim Book's and Billy Diedrick's

Right on with that Hoopster. Also the fact that we wore them for the bulk of the school year, at least until late Spring when we switched to "tenny's" much to the chagrin of the nuns who routinely lectured us on the "smell". If you wore "loggers" you were deadly in our schoolyard version of Soccer too. Those noontime matches were more like a slugfest of feet. Loggers required a fair amount of care as well. Regular treatments with Neatsfoot Oil, Mink Oil , or Huberds were required to keep them somewhat waterproof and supple.
http://www.fcsutler.com/phuberdoil.gif

Birddog

Bocco
04-06-2007, 10:21 PM
Jhoop and Birddog you got me thinking the late '50s and early '60s loggers must have been part of every parochial grade school uniform in at least the northwest....cords, white shirt, sweater and loggers (sneakers optional in the fall and spring.) This got me wondering did the publics wear thin too??????

kjstoph1
04-07-2007, 05:12 PM
...but true natives would NEVER use the phrase "ski jogging".

"Hookey-bobbing" was the proper term.

And 'bootlegging' had nothing to do with downloading MP3's from the internet.

But I digress.

Birddog
04-07-2007, 05:54 PM
..but true natives would NEVER use the phrase "ski jogging".
Ahem, true native here, I have heard "hookey bobbing" and it was occasionally used , but in the St Al's area it was most often referred to as ski jogging. Just how old are you, and are YOU a native? I was told long, long ago, I think maybe by a nun that it was a derivation of the term "skijoring" which is really quite different, but close enough in this context. Suffice it to say, that if you were telling a story about "hookey bobbing", I'd know what you were talking about, just as some of my friends from Wisconsin knew instantly when I mentioned "ski jogging" what I was referring to.
It's no doubt a matter of local custom, time, and place.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skijoring

Birddog

ZagNative
04-07-2007, 06:46 PM
Gamagin wrote:


I would love to hear from our friend Zagnative re N/of/Mission.

As I mentioned earlier, I was bemused, on soeone pointing out in recent years, a perceived class divide betweeen those ho lived south of mission vs. north of mission. South of Mission (or on Mission itself), you had your Kelly family (Judge Kelly), the Dugans, the Flaherty's, the Hurley's (including Margaret Hurley, long-time legislative representative in the State Legislature), Hueters (whose family tree included the founders of the Idaho city), the Augusts....

North of Mission, I think a minimum of six kids was necessary to qualify a family to buy a house - but maybe my perception was distorted by the fact that all my best friends were from families larger than our family of six kids, in the neighborhood north of Mission.

I wonder if the first snowfall found kids south of Mission on their hands and knees in the hall closet, as we were, trying to find at least one pair of boots one of the older kids had outgrown that was not all torn up? And in the spring, did they cast aside the piles of boots in the hall closet to find the single pair of metal roller skates the family shared and then try to imagine what happened to the key?

The only redeeming factor in living on Baldwin Avenue, aside from the wonderful locusts and chestnuts that lined the narrow street, was that at least we were not north of Illinois.

Seemed like there were dynasty families south of Mission, folks hose names you'd see on G-Prep football squads for years to come, generation-to-generation.

ZagNative
04-07-2007, 06:51 PM
Stoph, what the heck do you know about ski-jogging in the Gonzaga neighborhood? Weren't you south hill Spokane? Was it you who was the mastermind behind closing off Howard aside LC and establishing the west campus of LC?

gamagin
04-07-2007, 07:06 PM
<<kjstoph1 wrote . . ."Hookey-bobbing" was the proper term. >>

Someone's mother, i think above mission, or perhaps on the east side of the mission bridge, or perhaps above illinois, came up with that term.

More likely a nun who never lost a glove to a frozen bumper after letting go or got bombed inhaling exhaust.

As someone who could qualify for mileage plus behind at least 500 bumpers, we never, NEVER called it the above. I can't even say it now.

We ski jogged.

Behind priests' cars, nuns cars, parents cars, the Hillyard and N. Addison Bus, the Blue Goose, the bishop white seminary panel, the bishop, the neighborhood doctor's brand new station wagon, Mrs. gowdy's '36 ford and Mr. Reinhardt's Studebaker, beer trucks, Jack Stockton's old gold panel.

You name it.

we would even "borrow" a car now and again and pull each other.

the easiest way to hop a ride usually involved offering to help some neighbor push their car out of the snow. then when they took off, you just ducked down and held on.

In darker times, when we either didn't like the person, or it was a GU student we just wanted to tease, we would "drive" the car by runnning and pushing the car sideways while it was attempting to turn a corner. The result was hilarious. The car would keep turning, or spinning and then would whip back, at which time we would start pushing it that way. When VW's came out, we could actually drive it anywhere we wanted, they were so light. all good fun unless you are the driver.

The funniest incidents usually involved some irate driver who would try and get rid of us by jumping out of his car and sliding on his butt trying to chase us. we'd get back on the bumper and he'd attempt to patch out (spinning helplessly instead). If he was particuarly nasty, we'd hold the car from moving at all, or push him around for awhile, running on the curves and send him spinning etc. Until he realized he really was helpless against these barnacles with legs.

I believe the knees against the bumper allowed for stability and helped prevent getting pitched from the inevitable patches of cement or asphalt, or trolley track or manhole covers, which were never frozen.

birddog mentioned a california fellow he used to hop.

A GU student I remember really well was Casey Cummings. I am sure of the first name, pretty sure of the last.

Casey was a wealthy GU student from california. I doubt this was the same guy as birddog's, but he was loaded, always had a new car and he for some reason liked a good challenge. After hopping him several times, we would bet him he couldn't throw us. turns out he was crazier than we were, BUT we held on most the time and he always paid. If he managed to throw us, he usually would skip the demand for money, saying we'd go double or nothing. My guess is he knew we couldn't pay anyway.

My last ride with Casey, behind his big Chevy Impala was on a road that no longer exists.

It was about a two block (max) stretch immediately west of the COG and adjacent to the football oval. It must have been part of the oval's track at one time, but it had been turned into a road some years after the Crosby went in, or perhaps at the same time.

It's now part of the campus and I think includes a foot path to the foley and the K2 & K1 on the cog side of the old football field.

Casey foolishly bet us he could throw us before he had to make the T, which would now be Kennedy/Martin Centre. First we circled the block, going over patches of snow and cement and manhole covers (the usual throw them off spots) between Desmet and Boone (right past my house again), then did a small dogleg to the straight stretch, headed south towards the K1. Casey hit the gas. Clearly, he wanted to win in front of his buddies, who were rooting for us.

My guess was Casey got caught up in the excitement because he accelerated, and was doing about 30-35 by my estimation, on ice and snow, and rapidly accelerating when he (apparently) realized he was going to have to make a T turn one way or the other in about 3-4 seconds. No way.

He only managed to get sideways before the car slid into the curbing, we were pitched over the embankment and Casey wound up breaking his right front and right rear axle's upon impact. The wheels were cracked, too.

Besides the big expenses, he paid us, too, after we pointed out we stuck until we reached the T and after we scrambled back up the embankment. he counted noses, showed a little relief that none of us had been killed, then we all had a good laugh.

As for footwear, I wore a pair of actual ski boots which I waxed with ski wax. Could hardly walk before grabbing a bumper. I'd usually grab an easy first one 'apres waxing, like a shopper leaving IGA, just to get the boots properly worked in and not so slick I couldn't stand.

Sometimes w/really fresh wax and a buff, when I'd let go, I would pass the car I just let go of. If there was something like a stop sign, or light, ahead, it wasn't unusual to ski right through an intersection, or into a parked car or a tree. Or, worst of all, go into a raspberry producing burning slid followed by a collision with "something." Never anything soft.

God was with me -- and so was the traffic light -- on more than one occasion when this happened.

Of course we should have been killed several times. Almost goes without saying. We even used to fight to get closes to the exhaust (for heat) on a really cold day.

But I can't even remember any of us ever getting hurt.

I remember a bumper coming off a car right in front of Bishop White and the driver continued on while we held the huge chrome bumper with big, opulant bumper guards intact (there were 3-4 of us) and coasted to a stop, still holding the whole damned thing. I think it was a plymouth.

Another time, my best friend Mac, let go of a bumper (we were heading to St. Als for church, first friday or confession --perhaps all three -- at the time) and one of his gloves became frozen to the bumper and stayed stuck to it when he let go.

mac was terrified. started screaming and running after the car.

It turns out, His mother, who was probably the only person on earth he feared, had told him if he lost one more glove, she would not only have his bigger brother beat him to a pulp, but he would have to go the rest of the winter without gloves.

He chased the car all the way to the lights at Division and retrieved the glove. He grabbed the next car coming along. jumped it and was fortunate to find the unsuspecting first ride waiting for the light to change and grabbed his glove.

We witnesses could not stop laughing. Until mac returned.

Ski jogging was a great form of transportation. Highly underrated and greatly discouraged.

It was even good for the hand-eye-leg challenge as one tried not to slide under the tires. It also involved communications -- "hey, move over, ####ole, I got dibs on the bumper guard" and hand gestures "same to you, buddy."

Plus, there were survival skills involved, the challenge of toxic fumes, threatening terrain and sudden stops, girlfriends to impress, siblings to avoid and older bullies to dodge, too.

It was an urban jungle in the Holy Land. I Loved every minute of it.

ZagNative
04-07-2007, 07:12 PM
By the way, the name of the little grocery store Joe Rooney ran on Hamilton between Augusta and Nora was the Locust Food Market. Joe had the most incredible robins' egg blue eyes, and he was always crabby and impatient. Had a great selection of penny candies, to which, as DogTownKid points out, I was known to help myself when Joe was back in the butcher shop. No wonder he was crabby all the time ... Still feel kind of bad about that.

Which brings me to another fond memory that nevertheless elicits some guilty feelings: The old Heath Library west across the street from St. Al's. Great building with plank floors. I really believe that there are no outstanding fines remaining there on my library card, but I nevertheless feel a sense of regret about seeming to find it eternally difficult to return my stash of books without ransoming myself out of the doghouse.

ZagNative
04-07-2007, 07:43 PM
Gamagin, what a great memoir! I'm right there with you, hanging on that back bumper in the chill winter air.

We favored Morton Street for our ski-jogging. Two or three of us would stand across the street from each other, and as a car approached and could see us, we'd raise an imaginary rope stretched across the street, and when the car screeched to a stop, our buddies would come out from behind the bushes and latch on. Having the driver stop and yell just added to the allure and adventure.

kjstoph1
04-08-2007, 06:49 AM
Stoph, what the heck do you know about ski-jogging in the Gonzaga neighborhood? Weren't you south hill Spokane? Was it you who was the mastermind behind closing off Howard aside LC and establishing the west campus of LC?


LOL - i'm just messing with you all. "Ski-jogging and Hookey-bobbing" were used interchangeably. But up on the South Hill, we had chauffers and servants who pulled us behind the Bentleys. :-)

And, yes, rumor has it that yours truly had a hand in closing Howard Street but it was Mrs. Spokane Hutchison who 'masterminded' the campus - I was but a mere disciple of her vision.

gamagin
04-08-2007, 08:03 AM
<<LOL - i'm just messing with you all. "Ski-jogging and Hookey-bobbing" were used interchangeably. >>

calling it the second choice above would be akin to a French accent in Idaho. Or hearing a Yale graduate try to talk like a native texan. You know ? It just rings hollow.

I need to apologize for accusing someone north of Mission, east of the Mission bridge or above Illinois for making such a claim. and mothers and nuns, too. I should have known better.

It was you, A south sider. a cake eater.

The sort of person who had more than one uniform. more than two shirts and sweaters. his/her own underpants drawer. matching sox. whose clothes were ironed. who had an allowance. who had beautiful cheerleaders.
braces.

I could go on, but I'm making myself sick. you probably had our own room.

I'm going to stop irritating myself. clear my palate with altar wine. then serve mass and try to forget this whole "incident" and my part in it as well as pray for you, sir (mam) that you ditch that term for the foreign language it reveals.

think in terms of watching some young white kid walking around pretending to be a gang banger from the hood. Only his hood is in the gated community while the real banger's hood is a tenemant, or sitting on wheels in dogtown.

kjstoph1
04-08-2007, 08:23 AM
<<LOL - i'm just messing with you all. "Ski-jogging and Hookey-bobbing" were used interchangeably. >>

calling it the second choice above would be akin to a French accent in Idaho. Or hearing a Yale graduate try to talk like a native texan. You know ? It just rings hollow.

I need to apologize for accusing someone north of Mission, east of the Mission bridge or above Illinois for making such a claim. and mothers and nuns, too. I should have known better.

It was you, A south sider. a cake eater.

The sort of person who had more than one uniform. more than two shirts and sweaters. his/her own underpants drawer. matching sox. whose clothes were ironed. who had an allowance. who had beautiful cheerleaders.
braces.

I could go on, but I'm making myself sick. you probably had our own room.

I'm going to top irritating myself. clear my palate with altar wine. then serve mass and try to forget this whole "incident" and my part in it as well as pray for you, sir (mam) that you ditch that term for the foreign language it reveals.

think in terms of watching some young white kid walking around pretending to be a gang banger from the hood. Only his hood is in the gated community while the real banger's hood is a tenemant, or sitting on wheels in dogtown.

We southies attempt to bear the cross of privilege and bloodlines with humility.

More than one uniform? - Nope, none at all...those were the kids at All Saints who we targeted with snowballs from our fortresses.

Braces - check - all the better with which to eat our cake and Texas Donuts from Sigman's IGA - 35 cents for the finest bakery goods in town.

Beautiful cheerleaders - check....the curse of LCHS - though I am also quick to admit the gals at John Rogers were, shall we say, "attractive" in their own big-haired, tight sweater, certain moral casualness kind of way...

Ironed clothes - check...after surviving the lambasting of a mother's rant of "What? Is your arm broken? Iron it yourself."

ZagNative
04-08-2007, 01:31 PM
I need to apologize for accusing someone north of Mission, east of the Mission bridge or above Illinois for making such a claim. and mothers and nuns, too. I should have known better.

It was you, A south sider. a cake eater.

The sort of person who had more than one uniform. more than two shirts and sweaters. his/her own underpants drawer. matching sox. whose clothes were ironed. who had an allowance. who had beautiful cheerleaders.
braces.

I could go on, but I'm making myself sick. you probably had our own room.

Good God, Gamagin, it's obvious you were snatched at birth from our home on Baldwin Avenue. Not surprisingly, no one noticed you were gone. Easy come, easy go. Doesn't sound as if the abducter did you any favors, though, stashing you under a cabbage leaf south of Mission. You had the same steenkin' (literally) single uniform we did North of Mission, the same shared bedroom. Did you buy your uniform at Mrs. Hill's house on Indiana and Dakota, from the garage in back? Or was there another uniform outlet south of Mission?

I suppose that in your new family you also did not escape the nightly Rosary to pray for peace, kneeling together in the living room.

Did you also sing in the St. Aloysius Grade School Choir? In my day, we sang Gregorian Chant at a Latin Mass for each and every funeral at St. Al's. I remember singing at funeral Masses where we in the choir were the only people in the church aside from the deceased, the priest and altar boys serving the Mass, and a handful of regulars who happened to be there for daily mass. If you died in St. Al's Parish, you'd at least have the St. Al's choir to give you an escort to the gates of Paradise.

My favorite chant from those funerals: Dies Irae (http://www.chantcd.com/lyrics/diesirae.mid) (click to listen to a Midi file that will take you back in time). Hey! It ain't Sam Cooke's You Send Me, but that's a song for another day.

gamagin
04-09-2007, 08:28 AM
ZN: << Good God, Gamagin, it's obvious you were snatched at birth from our home on Baldwin Avenue. >>

Like one of those families in "The grapes of Wrath," we actually migrated right through your neighborhood and continued south from Hillyard to Boone Avenue. Railroad stock, we were. My grandpa was an engineer. He was killed in a rockslide in Montana in 1916, plunging the family from middle class straight into poverty. education was the only way out. It took them most of their adult lives because first they had to earn enough $$ to go to school, but they all attended, eventually & graduated College. those who survived.

ZN: << Not surprisingly, no one noticed you were gone. >>

No one in my family ever noticed when I was gone. Or there. It was heaven for me. total freedom.

ZN: << Did you buy your uniform at Mrs. Hill's house on Indiana and Dakota, from the garage in back? Or was there another uniform outlet south of Mission?>>

You had a "new" set of salt an peppers/skirts? and new shirts ? That didn't happen to me until about the fifth grade, when a few of the older bros got jobs. I was the youngest of five. I grew into a bigger brother's pair. Or bought someone else's who had grown out of them. Or, more likely, I wore a "donated" pair which would appear at our door, or at the school, church basement or in a box somewhere. It was always an empowering moment for me to have to try on a pair in a hall somewhere; or to have some jerk ask if the pants i was wearing "used to be mine -- they look like the ones my mom gave to the rectory."

I didn't have to worry about breaking them in at any rate. Or worry about stains. All done for me, in advance of my "ownership," by anonymous people. pre DNA, I had no idea what "it" was that couldn't be washed away. talk about "ready to wear." Or stone washed. or patches. We were WAY ahead of the trend curve . . .

All five of us had the same first communion suit. My mother, I think, bought it new for my oldest brother. there were more pins in that suit than there was fabric by the time it got to me.

ZN: <<I suppose that in your new family you also did not escape the nightly Rosary to pray for peace, kneeling together in the living room.>>

Yes, we prayed south of mission. Mostly at church, which was nearby. efforts to get us to say the rosary generally did not work. There were devotions, stations, first fridays, special masses for the dead, the living, the missing, those in limbo, those hoping to get to limbo on their way to (1) heaven or (2) elsehwere, Italians, irish, those not mentioned, plus that catch all "special intentions."

ZN: << Did you also sing in the St. Aloysius Grade School Choir? >>

Obviously you are of the female persuasion. I wouldn't be caught dead singing in a choir. Although I was caught and forced into singing (mouthing the words) once or twice for recitals. We served mass, drank from the cruets before mass and occasionally used this fine special blend to wash down a (unblessed) wafer or two to keep a body and soul together (so to speak) on a cold day. Or a warm day for that matter.

<< If you died in St. Al's Parish, you'd at least have the St. Al's choir to give you an escort to the gates of Paradise.>>

if we were lucky, we servers also got a buck or two for serving at funerals/weddings etc. If we didn't we went to the reception anyway.

Come to think of it, we went to the most receptions anyway, whether we served or not. Great place to see how the other half lived, grab a meal and generally be happy or sad with the crowd.

A favorite time of the year was the Novena of grace. Served it, too, many times. And other times I sold Novena of grace booklets (pamphlets?).

they were supposed to be 10 cents, if I remember correctly. However, we would NEVER have the right change, whether it was a quarter, a 50-cent piece or even a dollar.

that way folks would give us a quarter and wait for change. "Sorry," I'd say. "I haven't got any change."

"Keep it," would always be the wonderful, profitable, retort.

And I did.

Nothing like a good shakedown to help a Novena attendee feel like he/she is entering the day's session with a giving, open spirit, I rationalized.

Yes, we learned alot from the Jesuits. Most of it good. Some of it unintended (by them) about just exactly how to get a good Catholic to empty his wallet and feel good about it in the process.

Birddog
04-09-2007, 08:53 AM
Did you buy your uniform at Mrs. Hill's house on Indiana and Dakota, from the garage in back

Hmmmmm, not sure I remember that, although there are faint memories of somebody having a biz like that. I do remember them having either samples or actual product lined up on tables in the cafeteria/auditorium when we did the annual registration. I also remember buying the required "salt and pepper" cords up at the JC Penney on Division near Indiana. I must have had it pretty good, I remember having two sets of cords, usually one was new, and the other leftover from the year before. Mom would buy them new with cuffs then let out the cuffs the next year if I grew. Most of us weren't exactly "fashion plates", esp with those tell tale thread lines and the "new" look of the fabric where the cuffs had been. I always had 3 shirts, a white one for special days, and usually a light blue one and a tan one for everyday use. Mom always got pretty agitated if I wore that white one on anything but a special day. Of course these were worn under the required (except for Sept and May) "V" neck Navy blue sweater. Girls of course didn't have so many options, theirs was always just a navy jumper with a white blouse, cardigan sweater optional. There were failed attempts from time to time to ban tennis shoes (the smell) and loggers (the supposed marks) Cleats of all sizes and shapes were of course banned. It was no problem matching socks, when everyone one of them was white. The only problem arose when for reasons unknown to me they would fail to make it to the dirty clothes pile, and they would have to be recycled without a wash.

I sang in the Choir for 3 years, 6th, 7th, and 8th. Well I didn't really sing in the 8th grade, at least not towards the end. Since I took music lessons too (piano and violin, 3 years orchestra) I had a pretty good handle on reading music and all the terms. I think It was Sr Gretchen Mary that led the choir, but I could be wrong. Anyway, in 8th grade at practices, she kept giving me the sign for Pianissimo (quieter) . She would make eye contact and give me the sign. Finally one day, I stopped singing altogether and just mouthed the words. She gave me a big smile with an energetic thumbs up signaling "just right". At first I was somewhat crushed with hurt sensibilities. Later on I figured this might have had something to do with my voice changing. I always dreaded those class recitals, probably even more than the parents. I had to sing with the class and then play in the orchestra, and then butcher some solo on either the violin or the piano. At the beginning of 8th grade I convinced my mom, that despite all the rave revues from my music teachers (they claimed I had untapped musical talent) that I really had a better future if I devoted my spare time to sports and athletic pursuits. I felt free, since 4th grade I had been miserably slaving away at the piano and violin with little to show for it IMO. After 3 years, I was only 2nd chair violin, that should have been sign enough.

Birddog


PS, how'd we forget to mention Willie Wiley in this thread. Hell, I bet he skijogged barefoot.

gamagin
04-09-2007, 10:36 AM
BD & NZ: You were the guy(s) next to me on the bumper of some car, freshly ironed salt and peppers, v-neck sweater (dry cleaned), new coat, with brand new loggers, freshly greased, on your way to choir, or band practice.

You were singing and holding a violin case under one arm, as I recall.

I was heading down to molers to get a haircut in the free line, afterwhich I planned to sneak into the Fox for a movie before returning.

those were the days, eh ?

Birddog
04-12-2007, 06:58 AM
This could be posted under Catholic Grammar School, but prolly has more local history so I put it here.
KOA (Knights of the Altar) CHECK (6th, 7th, & 8th grades) This was also my first gig as a Somelier as you always asked the Priest if he wanted Red or White (if you didn't already know) At St Als, we used Novitiate Wine http://www.jesuitscalifornia.org/NETCOMMUNITY/Page.aspx?&pid=392&srcid=184
http://www.testarossa.com/nHist.html

Sampled the wine: CHECK (I preferred the white back then)

Sampled the unconsecrated hosts: CHECK (they were kept in large cellophane or plastic wrapped bags. Once in awhile we would score the big ones the priest used)

Bookcovers from grocery bags: CHECK (When we hit Prep, a select few of us had some really cool ones made from Budweiser advertising paraphernalia donated by a local legend. Some one raised a ruckus though,and we had to remove them.)

PB&J sandwiches: CHECK I think I had a PB&J damn near everyday except right after Thanksgiving (turkey) and after Easter (egg salad).Mom made her own grape jelly from the vines that grew alongside the driveway, the Peanut Butter was usually Skippy (my favorite and the sponsor of the TV show "You Asked For It" with host Art Baker. We NEVER had "Wonder Bread" in our house, my mom figured that any bread that could be rolled up into a little ball the size of a large marble probably had little in the way of nutritional value despite the claims that it "helped build strong bodies 8 (later12) ways" In the early days, our bread was delivered to the door twice a week by the "bread man" from MaryAnn Bakery. We rarely had white bread, it was usually some sort of multi grain. When they stopped home delivery, I believe it was the Pollyanna Bakery" located on the W side of Division between Nora and Indiana (IIRC) that took up the slack. They soon gave up on the delivery and we had to go to their store. They also made pizza crusts and supplied "Augusts" with them. There were other bread co.s that delivered, I think "Boge's" (in the blue gingham wrapper" was one.

We also had milk delivered to the door twice a week. We were a "Carnation" house, and he also supplied us with eggs,OJ, butter, cream, and half and half.
Our delivery was made via the alley, and as kids we took great delight in waiting for the milkman to take his product up to the back door and and while he was there we would sneak into the back of his truck and "steal" some ice.
"Early Dawn",Arden, and "Darigold", also delivered, but they always used the street in our neighborhood. When door to door was discontinued, we switched over to Benewah, the ones with the "Milk Bottle" store, one was downtown on or near W 1st, the other was on Garland. They had other non "milk bottle" stores (one was on Division in the vicinity of "Low Cost") but those were the only ones I remember as "Milk Bottles". http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://commonplacebook.com/photos/big_things/indy/historic/polk_dairy.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.agilitynut.com/vessels/2.html&h=360&w=450&sz=48&hl=en&sig2=-_UXto4pjFOqemW6-EWUXw&start=3&tbnid=UBMiLH2aCMEEZM:&tbnh=102&tbnw=127&ei=DEYeRoW8FYyCiQHZwYjEAw&prev=/images&#37;3Fq%3Dbenewah%2Bmilk%2Bbottle%26gbv%3D2%26s vnum%3D10%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DG

When the milk delivery ceased it meant no more fresh eggs, so my mom found a Mr Johnson of Johnson's Egg Farm and arranged for him to come by about every 2 weeks with 12 dozen eggs (his minimum). Mom would then redistribute the eggs to friends and family (with no up charge). That went on for years.

Dad would also buy a side or quarter of beef from time to time, and since this predated the widespread availability of a home freezer, the beef and the occasional deer or elk was stored up on Sinto and Division, at the Penguin Lockers. This was a business that for a fee supplied you with a cubicle in their huge freezer room. I think maybe they also were a butcher shop. Once a week we would go up there and get whatever we needed. As College students living in a house in 68/69 we also did this, one of the last lockers in town was located just on top of the N hill between Hamilton and Division, near Bridgeport and Addison.

Most of the moms, were stay at home back then. You could rest assured that there was always a set of eyes on the kids as they played in the alley or near the street. We all walked or rode bicycles to school. Even as a kindergartener, I walked to Logan School (there was no kindergarten at St Al's) from Sinto and Hamilton. We walked up the W side of Hamilton. I would wait at Nora and Hamilton for some other kids that lived up on Augusta and Nora and we would continue on to Logan gaining a kid or two every few blocks, until there were about 10 of us. We would then cross the street at the light on the N side of Illinois, to deviate from this route would have resulted in big punishment from all the parents. We were in the AM session, and when walking back home, we would always stop at one of the various places that sold penny candy, There was one on Hamilton just N of Illinois ( it might have been the white frame building on the corner of Montgomery and Hamilton with the big Ghirardelli mural on the side), the Cottage further down, and the Locust Food Store near Augusta. It's hard to believe in this day and age that 5 and 6 year olds were allowed to walk the 8, 9, or 10 blocks to school and do so in relative safety. Everybody kept an eye out for us. The people that ran the Cottage were esp observant as I recall. I remember once in awhile I had permission to stop at another kid's and they were the first people to have a TV that I knew of. When we arrived at his house, it was always right at the start of "The Guiding Light" and the music and intro was always on.

Birddog

Dogtownkid
04-15-2007, 05:53 PM
We lived in Coplen Park during the 40's. (Okay, so that doesn't qualify as "Dogtown," but probably no one on this board remembers Coplen Park, whereas Dogtown is still in existence. Actually, we always figured Coplen Park was a cut above Dogtown, and it was nice to have people to whom we could feel superior.)

We used to explore the foothills, and one day we met Willie Wiley. I was busy starting a fire in the underbrush or something, and my brothers were off talking to Willie. Later they told us that Willie had informed them that he believed in free love. We weren't entirely clear about the exact nature of free love, but we knew that it was a pretty advanced idea.

WhitemoonG
04-08-2008, 10:59 PM
As for memorable things Spokane, no longer in business, I didn't see the one easily highest of all in the firmament, namely

NAT PARK!

Remember the cute little wooden train ride?


Good old Smilin' Sylvan, West 227 Riverside!


Anybody remember good old Saturday AM cartoon host, Captain CY? Any idea what happened to him?

Remember Herb Hunter, voice of the Spokane Indians, later turned Dick Wright?


Oh, that Starlit Stairway phone number, PERMANENTLY embedded in the cerebral memory banks of any kid growing up in Spokane in the 50's thru early 70's,

is FAIRFAX 8 1521



NOT 5 1521.



If somehow in some future high stakes cloak and dagger spy scenario, it was vital to discern if someone was really an Inland Empire/Spokane/CDA native, or at least lived here in that era, if asked what the number for the Boyle fuel company was, and they say "Fairfax 8 1521" you KNOW they're for real. If they don't know that, they might still be legit, but it is immediately a stronger possibility that they may be an imposter!




Another question: What did "Boge Brothers" make?



Answer: Boge Brothers Bake Better Bread!



Dr. Ross Dog Food is Doggone Good!