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Section 116
03-21-2007, 03:00 PM
Ever wonder why you can't see the entire game of each of the regional semifinals in your area? Why is it you get a tipoff of one game and 15 minutes later you are switched to another game, depending of course, on your local area? And then for the second set of games you may join one for about 15 minutes and then switched again. Why can't you watch each game from start to finish? Michael Heistand of USA Today has the answers about who really controls what you see and when you see it:

http://www.usatoday.com/sports/columnist/hiestand-tv/2007-03-20-sports-on-tv_N.htm

RebornZag
03-21-2007, 03:22 PM
You can watch all the games on your computer if you want to for free. I've been doing that, and it's great cause you get an opportunity to see all the games, and YOU choose when you want to switch to another game....check it out....

lothar98zag
03-21-2007, 03:32 PM
You can watch all the games on your computer if you want to for free. I've been doing that, and it's great cause you get an opportunity to see all the games, and YOU choose when you want to switch to another game....check it out....
Actually you can watch MOST of the games on your computer. The game that is designated as "the game" for your local CBS station is blacked out on the computer. So...if you really want to see the game being shown locally by CBS you better hope it's close the whole way because if it isn't CBS will cut away and never return to it and you also won't be able to get it on your computer due to it being designated as "the black out" game.

Thomas_Sutpen
03-21-2007, 03:37 PM
Actually you can watch MOST of the games on your computer. The game that is designated as "the game" for your local CBS station is blacked out on the computer. So...if you really want to see the game being shown locally by CBS you better hope it's close the whole way because if it isn't CBS will cut away and never return to it and you also won't be able to get it on your computer due to it being designated as "the black out" game.

But you can watch the "black out" games later...The Indiana-Gonzaga game, for instance, can now be seen in Spokane (although why you would want to watch that debacle again I have no idea).

lothar98zag
03-21-2007, 03:40 PM
But you can watch the "black out" games later...The Indiana-Gonzaga game, for instance, can now be seen in Spokane (although why you would want to watch that debacle again I have no idea).
Yes you can watch all of the games on your computer after the fact. (although I think you have to wait longer for the games that are blacked out in your area)

lothar98zag
03-21-2007, 03:47 PM
Another complicating factor in switching is trying to avoid taking an audience who's just seen ads to a game that's about to break for ads which can make CBS' already ad-cluttered coverage seem more cluttered. CBS tries to avoid that and, overall, says "there are no more commercials now than in the past.

:lmao:

They try to avoid doing that? HA! They do this as much as humanly possible. They want to show as many ads as possible because they've contracted to pay 3 gazillion dollars to the NCAA that they have to air as many ads as possible to try to at least break even.

:mad:

My "favorite" move they make is when the local game is at the half and they are finished showing you another game to fill the time - they will cut away from the other game (usually right after coming back from commercial) and send you to the studio for about 30 seconds before showing some ads. After the ads are done you are back with your local game and the announcers talk for ~1 min about the 1st half and what to look for in the second half. You are then given more ads to watch before finally being brought back in time for the start of the second half.

Total time between leaving the filler game and the start of the second half or the main game = approx 7 minutes (6 of which are ads)

Section 116
03-21-2007, 03:48 PM
These are the two most interesting items to me in the entire article:

Having CBS' games shown online, as well as on satellite's DirecTV, gives viewers options to watch games not aired on their local CBS affiliate. The Achilles' heel, however, is that neither option allows viewers to see the game being shown on their local CBS station.

So, for the die-hards, why not offer a pay-per-view TV or online option to get the game, an already common way for viewers to get college football and basketball games being aired in other regions? CBS won't, Aresco says, "because we need to protect our affiliates" the local stations, most of which aren't owned by CBS, who wouldn't be thrilled if viewers got another way to watch the home team.

I've puchased both ESPN Gameplan (college football) and ESPN Fullcourt (college basketball) for a number of years now. I for one would pay to watch the games I want to watch and switch to the one shown in the local area when I want to. I do this all the time with ESPN pay-per-view.

I would like to have that option from CBS at some point in the future.