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soonerterp
03-16-2007, 03:10 AM
Pretty interesting, from the Seattle Post-Intelligencer (http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/basketball/307800_nban16.html) (bold emphasis is mine and mine alone).


Wally Szczerbiak was one of the most outstanding players in the 1999 tournament for Miami of Ohio, encouraging Kevin McHale to take him sixth in the draft for Minnesota, ahead of notables such as Richard Hamilton, Shawn Marion and Jason Terry.

While those three had better overall college careers than Szczerbiak, scouts made the common mistake of overemphasizing Szczerbiak's NCAA Tournament performance. Sonics director of player personnel David Pendergraft said his time is better spent scouting international prospects in Europe and then catching some NCAA Tournament games on television instead of scouting specific players.

[MY NOTE: Wow Pendo must get around ...]

Anyway ...


Pendergraft said he long ago learned to resist the lure of a dominating NCAA performance. Reputations should not be entirely built in March, especially since a high-round mistake pick could cost an organization for several years.

"I will never have as strong of an opinion on someone that plays strong in the NCAA Tournament. That is part of the equation," Pendergraft said. "You might get yourself in trouble.

"There are players who had some success in the tournament and people pulled the trigger. But there is no player playing that we don't know who they are and have pretty good pulse on their potential. The tournament is just a case study."

This year's draft will be among the deepest in more than 20 years, and mistakes could be costly for organizations trying to rebuild. Players such as Kevin Durant and Greg Oden will be available as well as a slew of impressive college juniors, seniors and international players. The Sonics could have their choice of players such as Joakim Noah, Al Hortford, Spencer Hawes, Roy Hibbert or Acie Law.

So they are not going to be wooed by a latecomer who turns it on under the bright lights. "The bottom line is that you can't put too much emphasis on anything," Pendergraft said. "The workouts, the tournament, the regular season. Each player builds a résumé over time, and the key for each team is to evaluate the entire body of work."

Into which I read: There's hope for under-the-radar players, sorta ...

... although I increasingly have really really negative feelings about the NBA, in terms of how its too much showbiz, not enough basketball (two years of the New Orleans Hornets temporarily put up in Oklahoma City wasn't all it was cracked up to be for me).

Sometimes I look at college players that I really really like and wonder, "wow do I really want to see them ply their trade in what's increasingly a worthless dog 'n' pony show?, or would I rather see 'em go to Europe or something where its not so glitzy but they still play some kind of team ball over there?"

Hey Mods, if this needs to be moved, move it to the general forum. I just noticed there's a crapload of spam over there, though, and I just don't know if I want to compete for attention with spam posts about products to enlarge one's naughty bits. K thx.

Birddog
03-16-2007, 06:14 AM
Hey Terp,
You have to consider the source here, this is a Sonic's guy being quoted, they haven't exactly set the world on fire with their personnel decisions. Maybe you're thinking ahead to the day in about a year and a half (maybe less) when the Sonics are in OKC I can't really blame most Puget Sounders for not wanting to pay the freight for a new arena, but if they want to keep the team that's what they have to do. I'm with you, I don't really enjoy the show biz orchestration that has become the NBA "game experience".
Coming soon to OKC............................................... .................................








your new Sonics
http://www.kecofm.com/New%20Main/Sonic%20Logo%20It's%20Sonic%20Good.jpeg

Birddog

soonerterp
03-16-2007, 12:07 PM
Hey Terp,
You have to consider the source here, this is a Sonic's guy being quoted, they haven't exactly set the world on fire with their personnel decisions. Maybe you're thinking ahead to the day in about a year and a half (maybe less) when the Sonics are in OKC I can't really blame most Puget Sounders for not wanting to pay the freight for a new arena, but if they want to keep the team that's what they have to do. I'm with you, I don't really enjoy the show biz orchestration that has become the NBA "game experience".

B-Dog ... Well, Bob Hill probably needs to go, but how would the Sonics be doing if Robert Swift hadn't torn up his ACL in the preseason? He was looking a lot better than he ever had before (ginger-fro aside)? Oh, wait, he'd probably still be buried on the depth chart because for some reason they keep drafting BIG MEN when they need to mix it up and get some guards.

I'm not all that convinced that the Sonics will move to Oklahoma City. One, I am not a fan of the way the Gaylord media machine (oh by the way, Gaylord Kid Louise Bennett is married to the guy who bought the team) keeps pushing this agenda that OKC *has* to have a major pro sports franchise (specifically an NBA team). It's like they think that'll make critics like myself shut up about some of the things that are not so great about Oklahoma. And even so, pro team or no pro team, college sports are always going to rule here. I think the only thing the Hornets illustrated was that a) this was indeed an untapped market and b) OKC really does have more stuff to it than tornadoes and terrorism. My attitude is "I'll believe it when I see it, and when I see it I'm probably only still going to go to the occasional game just to see a visiting team that I actually LIKE" (however: Nick Collison and Chris Wilcox -- he for reasons that should be obvious -- are my "pet Sonics.")

And I don't entirely blame the public for being unwilling to pony up fundage for a new arena considering that they're still paying for the now-demolished Kingdome.

More later B-Dog, gotta go to work.

Birddog
03-16-2007, 12:44 PM
Hey Rev Terp,
I'm in the choir if you haven't noticed. Gaylord bashing is way overblown in this area, but then I think the dominant newspaper is in most areas. It just comes with the territory. I'm about a one game (NBA) a year guy, I don't really enjoy the game at that level too much. I know ol Clay isn't considered to be the brightest bulb in the string but he did marry up and didn't have to follow through on that messy class attendance and graduation stuff from OU.

Birddog

soonerterp
03-17-2007, 04:54 PM
Hey Rev Terp,
I'm in the choir if you haven't noticed. Gaylord bashing is way overblown in this area, but then I think the dominant newspaper is in most areas. It just comes with the territory. I'm about a one game (NBA) a year guy, I don't really enjoy the game at that level too much. I know ol Clay isn't considered to be the brightest bulb in the string but he did marry up and didn't have to follow through on that messy class attendance and graduation stuff from OU.

Birddog

Reverend Terp? Wow never heard that one before ... :) I kinda knew you were in the choir from past posts, but when I get a burr i my pants I just kind of go and its hard to put on the brakes.

I know Gaylord bashing is overblown but I still feel like those of us who have managed to not get brainwashed are the minority in Sooner Land. I'm not exactly in love with the financial activism, if you will, of some of the underlings in Bennett's group (or Bennett himself, for that matter), but that's a story for another time.

Sorry I digress ...

At the end of the day I think David Pendergraft (the Sonics' DOPP in the article I linked, not the Big Redhead) has the right idea to look over a college player's whole body of work instead of what he did for two or three weeks in March. Wherein I think the problem lay is that the Sonics (and maybe some other have-not NBA teams like the Milwaukee Bucks or the Portland Trail Blazers), there's some things in that particular organization that aren't clicking on the right cylinders, whether its an incompetent general manager or an incompetent coach or a spoiled veteran player who's sick of the constant rebuilding that might be partly a result of a desperate front office looking for instant gratification instead of letting his young'ns grow and gel with one another as a team.

I offer the Chicago Bulls, believe it or not, as an example of allowing a core group of young players all drafted in 2003 or later, to grow as a unit (and three with, for the most part, impressive college credentials). I think this is critical when considering that before the trade deadline there was serious talk about trading a member of that core, Luol Deng, for superstar Pau Gasol of the Memphis Grizzlies. Instead of doing that, Chicago stuck with what they had. I thought that took big ... um, you know, spherical objects. What's more, because of the emergence of that core, the Bulls are back in the upper tier of the Eastern Conference, unlike a few short years ago. Granted, they did acquire Ben Wallace as a free agent, but the aging star (who, I remind, was non-drafted out of Virginia Union and really did scratch and claw his way to where he is) hasn't to me had that much of an impact on them. And they got former LSU star Tyrus Thomas in the 2006 draft (the result of a trade with Portland, otherwise they would have had Texas' Lamarcus Aldridge) ... and Thomas' NCAA body of work is a grand total of one year. Hey at least it was a season instead of a three week window, and while he has done some dumb crap, Thomas is more promising that I originally thought he would be.

I'm hoping that with the recent front office change something like that will happen with Portland, although they'll still have a ways to go to erase the financial sins of the Nash/Patterson era (i.e. outsized contracts to do-nothing malcontents like Darius Miles). Likewise, Charlotte, which also has a nice young group, although that team has a lot more issues like poor attendance in a market that I believe soured on the NBA because of George Shinn's issues earlier in this decade, not to mention a new executive -- yes, Michael Jordan -- whose body of work as a team executive leaves a hell of a lot to be desired compared to his body of work as a player.