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NEZAGFAN
06-20-2008, 01:09 PM
Apparently Brandon Jennings is having some difficulty getting a high enough test score to be eligible at Zona and is considering playing overseas next season before entering the draft. He will get his test results back for the third time next Thursday, he hasn't qualified twice thus far. Could have major implications on Zona's season. Budinger may be regretting coming back after all.

http://sports.espn.go.com/ncb/news/story?id=3454157

BroncoZAG615
06-20-2008, 01:26 PM
He doesn't appear to be "Wildcat material" ;)

theothegreat21
06-20-2008, 03:11 PM
I really hope that GU never recruits a player like Jennings. Player's like him are what is wrong with the current student athlete in basketball. I really hope that basketball adopts the college baseball approach, which is you can go pro straight from high school, but if you go to college you must stay for 3 years

JAGzag
06-20-2008, 03:24 PM
I really hope that GU never recruits a player like Jennings. Player's like him are what is wrong with the current student athlete in basketball. I really hope that basketball adopts the college baseball approach, which is you can go pro straight from high school, but if you go to college you must stay for 3 years

Unless you know something the rest of us don't, that seems a bit harsh, don't you think? So the kid isn't a good student, but I doubt that's what's wrong with student athletes as a whole.

theothegreat21
06-20-2008, 03:37 PM
Unless you know something the rest of us don't, that seems a bit harsh, don't you think? So the kid isn't a good student, but I doubt that's what's wrong with student athletes as a whole.

I'm sorry if it seems that I am questioning Jennings because he is a bad student...that is not my intention. My issue with Jennings, is that if you look back on other articles with him, is his disregard for the student part of "student athlete". Jennings would not be going to college if it were not required of him, and if you read the article, he states he is a "one and done". If you are a "one and done" then you really only need to go to school for a semester, as this will keep you eligible for second semester. The system that is currently in place is horrible, if you are trying to give the image of a "student athlete"

CDC84
06-20-2008, 03:56 PM
Jennings is the first guy I am aware of from the post-age limit era who has had major problems getting academically qualified. In fact, a number of these kids like Greg Oden and Thaddeus Young were outstanding students coming out of high school.

2011Zag
06-20-2008, 05:10 PM
Gosh there must be widespread panic in Tucson and on the Zona boards. The last year has almost been the perfect storm down there. If we weren't playing them I might feel a bit of sympathy, wait naaawwww.:D

NEZAGFAN
06-24-2008, 09:03 AM
Arizona signee Brandon Jennings didn't go to Tucson on Monday as originally expected for the start of summer school classes.

Too much media interest, and his SAT score coming on Thursday -- which he has yet to receive a qualifying score -- prompted Arizona to wait until the weekend for Jennings to be on campus. If Jennings isn't eligible, he said he may pursue a contract with a European team.

spudzag
06-24-2008, 09:28 AM
Zona did get some good news, Greg Smith, an 09 center, commited.

theothegreat21
06-24-2008, 09:41 AM
News could be getting worse....according to Jeff Goodman, he might head to Europe even with proper qualifying scores

http://community.foxsports.com/blogs/goodmanonfox

LongIslandZagFan
06-24-2008, 10:43 AM
I really hope that GU never recruits a player like Jennings. Player's like him are what is wrong with the current student athlete in basketball. I really hope that basketball adopts the college baseball approach, which is you can go pro straight from high school, but if you go to college you must stay for 3 years

Remember that Pargo initially had problems qualifying and he has turned out to not only be an exceptional player but also a very good student. Don't judge kids in these situations right away. There could very well be other stories behind the situation.

That being said, I am getting the vibethat this kid could be a bust all the way around. If he goes overseas he runs the risk of not being in the spotlight and lowering his draft potential. He could very well end up staying in Europe for his entire career.

ZagNative
06-24-2008, 11:05 AM
Agreed, LIZF. As the aunt of a good student athlete (and even finer young man) who was a terrible test-taker, I try to catch myself up short whenever I find myself judging kids harshly for challenges they find with the SAT and ACT. My nephew worked harder in HS than my kids ever did (my kids being exceptionally good test-takers), and he got adequate but never exceptional grades, but there was never any question about whether he would go to college.

Some people (including me) are too quick to say that some kids "just aren't "college material." Maybe that's true for some kids, but every kid who wants to go to college should get the chance. My poor-test-taker nephew graduated from Seattle U (on an athletic scholarship after a couple of years in JC - he was a good but not great bb player) and he makes a big contribution today as a social worker working with at-risk young people.

Had it not been for his athletic scholarship at Seattle U would he have graduated from college at all? More important, perhaps, would he have been immersed in Jesuit culture as he was for two years (after four at G-Prep) and emerged from the experience with his idealism, commitment to service, and belief in his ability to make a difference in the world in tact?

CDC84
06-24-2008, 12:05 PM
Jeremy Pargo may have had struggles getting academically qualified, but as has been well documented through new stories and such, it was a battle he was commited to winning. He wanted to go to college, he wanted an education, and he wanted to play college basketball. The coaching staff, as well as this poster, felt from day one that Pargo would thrive at Gonzaga because it's an environment that's conducive to learning, and that his academic issues were really more of a product of where he grew up as opposed to what he was really capable of doing. He had the necessary character and maturity as a person to thrive at Gonzaga, both on the floor and in the classroom.

The difference with Jennings is that I am not sure if he has Jeremy's level of commitment when it comes to making the academic thing work out. Perhaps he feels that he doesn't need to because he's a first round pick in a year, but I don't think the lure of the NBA makes kids into poor students. If that were the case, there would have been more kids like Jennings in the last 3 recruiting classes. There just haven't been.

mnzag24
06-24-2008, 12:09 PM
plus, Pargo was never considered to be one-and-done like Jennings. That makes a huge difference.

Reborn
06-24-2008, 12:14 PM
Great post CDC. I appreciate you bringing out this side of Jeremy. I think people really need to see that about him. I feel Jeremy really is a very , very special Zag, and in the long run I believe that he is opening up a path way for many, many talented kids who are much like him to find there way to Gonzaga University. Gonzaga does care about the kids out there. Gonzaga does want to make a real difference in their lives. GU DOES believe that a college education is a precious gift, and I think it's the greatest gift THAT GU gives to all it's students. I hope parents come to realize this about GU. Jeremy, as you point out CDC, is a very good example of what GU has done for him as a person. And that's more important then anything else.

LongIslandZagFan
06-24-2008, 12:16 PM
Jeremy Pargo may have had struggles getting academically qualified, but as has been well documented through new stories and such, it was a battle he was commited to winning. He wanted to go to college, he wanted an education, and he wanted to play college basketball. The coaching staff, as well as this poster, felt from day one that Pargo would thrive at Gonzaga because it's an environment that's conducive to learning, and that his academic issues were really more of a product of where he grew up as opposed to what he was really capable of doing. He had the necessary character and maturity as a person to thrive at Gonzaga, both on the floor and in the classroom.

The difference with Jennings is that I am not sure if he has Jeremy's level of commitment when it comes to making the academic thing work out. Part of it could be motivated by the fact that he feels he's a guaranteed first round pick in 2009. If Jeremy had failed to qualify, he probably would've gone the JC route or something. He would've done everything and anything to make it.

I wouldn't dispute that at all. But just reminding people to be a bit careful when getting on a kid about not qualifying. I agree that Jennings I think could care less about school from the sounds of it. I would hope that people around him would think differently, but oh well... Hope his world doesn't crash down around him in Europe if that is where he goes.

Reborn
06-24-2008, 12:20 PM
Great post CDC. I appreciate you bringing out this side of Jeremy. I think people really need to see that about him. I feel Jeremy really is a very , very special Zag, and in the long run I believe that he is opening up a path way for many, many talented kids who are much like him to find there way to Gonzaga University. Gonzaga does care about the kids out there. Gonzaga does want to make a real difference in their lives. GU DOES believe that a college education is a precious gift, and I think it's the greatest gift THAT GU gives to all it's students. I hope parents come to realize this about GU. Jeremy, as you point out CDC, is a very good example of what GU has done for him as a person. And that's more important then anything else.

I appreciate both LIZF's AND ZN's as well. I only read CDC's first (sometimes I start at the bottom of a thread if I've already read those at the top). Some nice qualty things shared on this thread. I agree that we should be careful about throwing stones at kids, or anyone for that reason. What goes does it do to say unkind things about Jennings. Give the kid a break. How many of you even know the kid.

webspinnre
06-24-2008, 01:46 PM
I agree with the comments about an education truly being a gift, and because of that, I do hope Jennings gets his qualifying score so that he can at least start college.

Zagpower
06-25-2008, 08:15 AM
The kid wants to go to college to major in basketball for one year. Not sure why you should need certain SAT numbers to follow that dream. Isn't the idea behind minimum SAT requirements to judge if a student is ready for college? For his "major" he is plenty ready and qualified.

I hope he does go to Europe if he is not interested in the academic experience of college. Going to Europe will in no way hinder your NBA dreams as the huge influx of European players over the last few years will attest to.

BroncoZAG615
06-25-2008, 08:28 AM
The kid wants to go to college to major in basketball for one year. Not sure why you should need certain SAT numbers to follow that dream. Isn't the idea behind minimum SAT requirements to judge if a student is ready for college? For his "major" he is plenty ready and qualified.


I hope I am missing the sarcasm in this post.

Brandon Jennings knew what college was all about. He knew he had to pull his head out of the sky and put it into a book and he didn't do that. The worst part is that he just flat does not want to do that. Basically each and every American has a dream that we are trying to pursue but we live in the "real world" in which you are constantly tested. My dream has nothing to do with taking science classes but does that mean that I don't need certain test numbers to graduate college? No...because of that whole 'real world' thing.

It's called being well-rounded and it is not a quality found in very many basketball players these days. Jennings, like the Carmelo's of the world are flat punks. Every quote is oozing with a pompous attitude. They care about #1 and they have never even thought about anything else from jump street.

Luckily though, because we value athletes so highly in this world, Brandon's landing place will be a cushy spot in Europe for a year.

ZaggyStardust
06-25-2008, 08:45 AM
Brandon Jennings knew what college was all about. He knew he had to pull his head out of the sky and put it into a book and he didn't do that. The worst part is that he just flat does not want to do that. Basically each and every American has a dream that we are trying to pursue but we live in the "real world" in which you are constantly tested. My dream has nothing to do with taking science classes but does that mean that I don't need certain test numbers to graduate college? No...because of that whole 'real world' thing.

It's called being well-rounded and it is not a quality found in very many basketball players these days. Jennings, like the Carmelo's of the world are flat punks. Every quote is oozing with a pompous attitude. They care about #1 and they have never even thought about anything else from jump street.

Luckily though, because we value athletes so highly in this world, Brandon's landing place will be a cushy spot in Europe for a year.

Do you know the whole story about Brandon? Like the whole reason he left L.A. for Oak Hill is so that he could concentrate solely on B'Ball and his studies. He didn't want to be distracted by the temptations of the big city. While I believe he is a little full of himself and somewhat misdirected, to call him a punk and such is just plain wrong. He's an exceptional talent that struggles with academics and did something very disciplined to try to deal with that. Perhaps it's the best thing that can happen for BJ as well as the Cats. I'm not sure that Arizona needs another one and done auditioning for the NBA at every game....

Zagpower
06-25-2008, 09:15 AM
I hope I am missing the sarcasm in this post.

Brandon Jennings knew what college was all about. He knew he had to pull his head out of the sky and put it into a book and he didn't do that. The worst part is that he just flat does not want to do that. Basically each and every American has a dream that we are trying to pursue but we live in the "real world" in which you are constantly tested. My dream has nothing to do with taking science classes but does that mean that I don't need certain test numbers to graduate college? No...because of that whole 'real world' thing.

It's called being well-rounded and it is not a quality found in very many basketball players these days. Jennings, like the Carmelo's of the world are flat punks. Every quote is oozing with a pompous attitude. They care about #1 and they have never even thought about anything else from jump street.

Luckily though, because we value athletes so highly in this world, Brandon's landing place will be a cushy spot in Europe for a year.

It was somewhat tongue and cheek as I have little doubt that the Student part of the student athlete is often shortchanged by those that do attend college and play sports with professional aspirations. I just see very little difference between a student athlete with sub-par SAT's playing ball and taking easy classes that offer no real career benefit and a student athlete with barely passing SAT's that take those same easy classes. In my eyes there is very little difference but we treat them like there is a world of difference offering one a full-ride scholarship and refusing the other admission. Seems a little harsh for what might be a 50 point difference on a standard test.

Your example of graduating requirements is apples and oranges. No one said we should give Jennings a degree. It's about whether we should give someone an opportunity. I hope he does go to Europe and leaves that Scholarship open for someone that may be more serious about their academics but I think we are deluding ourselves if we think most one and done players are taking the type of classes that add to their well-rounded education and will prepare them for a real-world job. We heard about Greg Oden over and over because he was the exception.....a certain pro that was taking accounting and business classes anyway.

Areyoukiddingme
06-25-2008, 09:31 AM
Will They still make it to the field of 64 come march. it seems no matter how bad they are they still get in.

BroncoZAG615
06-25-2008, 10:05 AM
I never said I think Jennings should think about getting a a degree, ZagPower. You said he is chasing a "dream" and dreams require some obstacles to get there. For someone that wants to be admitted into college, they must first pass the SAT. He said that on the first test he "didn't try" but on the second test he did so we will see what happens on the third try. So I do not consider this apples and oranges, it is very related because everyone has obstacles.

I'm not about to give an opportunity if he can't pass a simple entrance exam just because he will be making millions in two years; he has enough people waiting on him hand and foot.

Zaggy, I do know the whole story about Jennings. I do know how his coach says BJ matured so much from his time at Oak Hill and really soaked in the challenge of opening a couple books. Like is all pretty on paper but you can bet the farm that basketball is the reason he went to Oak Hill. No one thinks of Oak Hill and thinks academics, they think basketball. Sure, it was probably a nice perk of going there and it is better than Compton and I'm happy for him but I am not going to believe for a second that Jennings had this craving to hit the books.

Like Theo said, the system is garbage but as I said, we REWARD these athletes for their shortcomings because they can just hop over the pond.

MickMick
06-25-2008, 11:34 AM
Greg Smith is good news for Arizona. If they get Jennings on board and Gaddy to recommit then all is well in Cat land.